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Pictures 
are worth 
repeating 



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These are the pictures 
f^lbW* netted S^ 

->Mi^»m€e fcoiwelT ftiree'" 
^iUards in the 1973 Vir^ia 
Press Assn. (VPA) 
^r. photoi^raphy contest for 
f Virginia newspapers. Mr. 
Mann's photo at top of the 
|l4M>y reunion of POW 
Cmdr. Robert S. Fant and 
his fiancee llebecca Otts 
(mow Mrs. Fant) was named 
runner-up in the general 
news (riioto division of the 
contest. His humoroas phtfto 
at right of an appreciative 
girl-watcher on the beach 
won an honorable mention 
in (he feature photo 
category. Mr. Colwell's 
photo at bottom of some 
uncomfortable - looicing 
wrestlers caught in mU-air 
was named runner-up in the 
sports photo category. The 
two |>hotographers will 
receive awards certificates 
for (heir winning photos . 
Saturday at the VPA 
cmvention and banquet in 
Richmond. 



Enrollment up as TCC 




e to 





By DONNA HENDRICK 
Son Staff Writer 

Students are flodiing to 

^Ofginia'* eepmuBlty^^eges, 

ailttb£Vii#iia Gleadi campus 

of Tidewater Community 

CoU^e ^TCC) is no exception. 

As the Beach school ivepares 
to bifin its irinier quarter of 
claiSM, school ofBclals are 
expecting anothw increase in 
nirollment. Approximately 
2^ studenU attended the faU 
quarter, with about 300 new 
StudenU expected for the winter 
quarter, which begins Monday. 

The other 30 community 
college campUMS in the state 
should realize the same hi- 
crease in enrollment for the 
whiter torn. This year, the 
number of students mrdled hi 
all of the state's community 
cdleges mcreased fay S7 par 
cent over last year's 
enrollment. 

"We Just keep on gofaig up hi 
enrollment," said D. William 
Bridges, director of continuing 
ediKBtion at the TCC Beach 
campus. 

jyWCAL, TOC-waatoHfr 

"leadi even iaate students, Mr. 
Bridges said. To do so, the 



college is concentrating on 
eiqpiiMUng its stiident-services 
«ai|i^iililiigttitf( 




Hiis teiFmrthe coQege will 
offer daytime classes at 
Bayside Baptist Church and 
evMibif classes at Kempsvtile 
Hi^ Sdwol, hi addition to 
classes at the mahi campus at 
state^iwned camp Pendleton. 

"We want to bring the college 
to the peo|de, especially with 
the enei^ crisis now at hand," 
said Dr. Michael LaBouve, 
provost of the Beach campus. 
"We are now anUcipating more 
off-campus courses," he con- 
thiued. 

"Tliere's a trend away fh>m 
strictly on-campus offerings 
now," explahied Dr. George 
Pass, president of the 
Tictewatw Community College 
system (which faidudes cam- 
puses in Virginia Beach, 
Chesapeake and Portsmouth). 

"THIS IS the coUege without 
walls concept," Dr. Pass 
continued, "We msy someday 
IP^uate students win never 
set foot on campus. We ooiild . 
Hilhirdiy wKeh we have more 
stadnts off-campitt than on. 
We must conthiue to locdi for off- 



campus facilities that are 
sultaUe for our needs, such as 
mil^^^^llations, churdies 

The Beach campus will have 
a new home hi the spring of 1075 
when the planned Gnm Run 
campus is ^tfue to open. 
However, the new campus win 
be ovw capacity when it opens, 
and tight acheduUng of day and 
evening classes will be 
nece«sary to accomodate the 
growhig number at students 
m^io want to attend college hi 
Vh^hiia Beach. 

In addition to classes at 
Bayside Baptist Church and 
KempsviUe High School, the 
Beach campus also uses 
laboratory facilithn at Kdlam 
Hi|^ School, First Colonial High 
School and the Vlndnla Beach 
Vocational-Technical Ikhicatiiui. 
Center. 

THE BEACH SCHOOL is also 
taking the college to Mudenta at 
Naval Air Station (NA8) 
Oceaqa and the Naval 
Amphibious Base at Little 
CrsMt. A ooUago preparatory 
program is offered in 
nooperatlon with local nrilltary 
commanders and the Vetwans 
Administration. The fall 
enrollment hi the pn^am had 



36 itudmu with 45 studcnto 
anticipated ^r the winter 
quarter. ' '"''S^^^^-r^ 

The school has also isi^iik 
an oiitraich prolram to inform 
area -veterans of benslits and 
provide general ^uter and 
educatlbnal counselhig. 

Rs^iQlUon for the vdnter^ 
quarto* wlU be hdd at the 
B«ach campui Thursday and 
fVlday fhMU 8:30 to ll:30 a.m. 
andl to 4p.m. for aU imgrams. 

REOUnUTION WILL also 
be conducted at Bayside Baptist 
Oiurch Monday fhrni 9 a.m. to 1 
p.m., at KempsviUe M^ Sdiool 
Monday through Jan. 10 fhim 
6:30 to 7:30 p.m. and on the 
main campus for all evwhig 
imigrams Mon<|ay through Jan. 
10 from S to 7 p.m. 

Students who attended the 
Beach campus during the fall 
quarter pre-reglstered in 
November. 

Tuiticm for Vtaifaiia Beadi 
reaideitts is 171 per quarter for 
fUU4hne stuiknts or 18.15 per 
quarter credit hour for part- 
time students. • 

St u de nU mu Brpurehlie ths^r^ 
own boirits and supplies which 
cost an average of 830 to 850 per 
quarter for full-time propams. 



Cargo movements on the increase 



Vhr^la's ports cimthiued to 
grow ui 1078, markfaig two 
"first!" in general cargo ton- 
nage md number of contabiers 
handled. 

Pv^Ae Anytime in M^ory, 



&fHii|ilN( 



le firflL timi 

"ww^trliiMi 



bf Ae pnts readied more than 
3,000,000 tons. In addition, the 
number of contahiers handled 
passed the 190,000 mark, 
another first for Virginia's 
ports. 

Besides handlh^ standard 
commodities such as grahi, 
coal, fordgn cars, {dywood and- 
rubber, the ports received some 
rather unusual commodities 
and saw some unusual uses of 
terminal equipment during 
1978. 

DESPITE HEAVY security 
regulations concerning Nor- 
folk's vast Navy oomfdex, trade 
with Russia throi^ Vh-gfaiia 



ports saw two significant 
sh^enU to the Soviet Unton hi 
1973. 

Heavy equipment used hi 
logging, land clearing and 
ditching operations moved 

.;tkmtm Vmnn Iti ns in ^ 
FtonMi mp tw d^very to 
Helsinki, Finland. Then it 
went by raU to Moscow for 
display at an international 
exhibition. At the same time, a 
unique 40-foot contahier houshig 
a "multi-purpose exhibiton 
module" left for Moscow. 
An unusual cpnunodlty was 

~ shiiqied to Lagos, iHgeria, from 
the National OaU Co. of Cedar 
Rapids, Iowa, through 
Virginia's ports. The com- 
moSty was 100,000 pounds of 
popcorn forme as a nutritional 
supiriement to the Nigerian's ' 
normal diet. 

BICYCLES AND liquid 

propane gas moved through 



Virghiia ports, both helpfaig to 
iriteviato the eneiiy crisis in 
sone way. Late thto year, it was 
amounced Oat Vii^hiia pojru 
wotdd be the primary bnport 
center for the Ea^titb-mmk 



ffr« ftin ih^mMnt of ^d 
propane gas arrival from 
Venesuela at the Atlantic 
Energy Inc. facility in 
Chesapeake. 

American Export Lines 
helped start a new Hampton 
Roa(to-Far East service by 
sending seven refrigerated 
containers of chicken and 
turkeys from Rockingham 
I^iultiV Marketh^ Co-Op of 
Broadway, Va., to Tokyo. 

Hie heavy^ cuabUities i^ 
Newport News ShtpoutUttng and 
Drydock Co. were used hi 
March to unload at 37N<m 
nuclear reactor drum for 
Vepco's North Anna Power 



Statkm. Ilian, four hdlo^ars 
were sh^iped overseas aboard 
an Atlantic Container Une 
ship to SoitthamiMon, England. 

^ TWO COMPLBT E charcoal 

twe MBMd tfifoagh VbgiBla 
pwrts to Europe, and a pabi 
dryer was Mppai to niaaud. 

New|ort News handled a 
giant M,847ixiund midtogany 
tog daatined for a furniture 
manuliactiaw in IndianapolfB, 
and many Virginia porto 
handled hmsey from Meidcan 
Line ships used to sweeten 
Virginia tobacco for pipes, 
cbewfaig tobacco and cigarettsa. 

Lamberts Point Docks 
received the largest ^pment of 
toirioca flour hi more than 80 
years from Thailand, and Rich- 
mond Deepwater Terminals 
handled 70,000 artificial 
Christmas trees made In 
Taiwan. 



School staff grows, 
moves to new office 




The Virginia Beach City 
Public School's public In- 
fmnation atRce has expanded 
lU staff and moved to new 
ipiarters. 

Lome ZUlor, former women's 
editor of The Sun, has johied the 
public information office staff 
as assistant for publications and 
printhig. John Ho^te is public 
tafoimation officer and Jeri 
Moore is secretary and 
receptionist. 



The hiformation office, for- 
merly located hi a smaU annex 
near the school administratimi 
buildhig at the Princess Anne 
municipal center, has now 
moved into the mahi sdwol 
admtaiistration buildfaig, acron 
the street from city hall. 

The new telqihone nimibers 
are 427-4641, 427-4648 and 427- 
46e. llie wAools' public hi- 
formatim office handles all 
news for the dty's sdiooU. 



Faces make new 
photo feature 

Facing life and all Its problems is serious 
business, but there is also a humoroitt side to the 
faces, we present. The faces we "put on" ourselves 
fflid come into contact with every day are the 
subjects of a new |:rfioto feature making its debul in 
this week's Sun. 

The faces may reflect intensity. thoughtftilnMS. 
sorrow, comedy or surprise at the unexpected. 
Iliere is no limit to the variety ot faces <»* situations 
w^icfa may appear. Let's take a look at Mffsdves 
and (Hir friencte. Fw the first face, turn to page 10. 



Fraeiis to pasties 



Humor found in insurance claims 



Insurance U not usually thoi^t of as 
a funny buriness, bitt Aetna Ufe and 
Casualty, which handled 80 million 
insiB-Mce clahns hi 1973, has found that 
that's himuH- hi everythhi g e ven a 
claim for damages. 

Here are some "odd claims" Aetna 
handled bi 1973, inovta^ agahi that 
peofde do tiie daradest thtags nWle still 
being aUe to lamh at themsdves. 

LAST JUNE a Massachusetts 
supomarket wm hi tlw midst d a 
shonMi« oimdi. CheckoiM Unes wore 
so kmg th^ Uocked the store's aides. 
A middlcHiged woman and her 
dau^iter tried to cd tturou^ one d te 
Unes to omttaiue thdr dioppta^. 

"Excise me, pleMe," said the 
woman to a man wd^ hi Itae. M die 
man didn't care to move and lootfy 
maieunced hto r^ to stay preetoslr 
wboe he tns. The two vgued baci nd 
ii8lh to Uie oiJeymcBt d die i^er 



FinaSy,^tte inte wmim delivered an 
dUmatian— "Stop ydUng at me w III 
pour a bMtle d l^acfa over fcm 
bmil" Tke mm RMred badi Od be 
woiMMMiHt. 

Skn^ Ito WMUB sdeded a boMe d 
bleacb from her Pepping cart. 
Metkulagtty she unsovwed tt^ «#. 



Clarrtdly she iqi^oded it on her op- 
ponent's head. 

MAO AS A wd shi^iper, the nun 
chose his otra bottle d triMch ami 
l»riddy p«rformed the same ttrviat. 

Then other shoppers johied the h-ay. 
They too grabbed bottles d Ueadi and 
mffrily dMaedooe anodJO'. The mde«, 
ho«wver, came to an abndM halt «^en 
the itavghta- of the woman who begu It 
an crtod out, "Ma, ma! Did you farbig 
yoiff gin?" 

Thus did the small diOd disbiBie the 
crowd. 

Pats atao has a hani hi odd dafans. 
CoMfefcr the mfawis wMnm i^ was 
trapped on her fdure grave dte nMtt to 
thefhid r^hig {dace d h«- deceased 
iMndMOd when an l.tOOiwued tOBd>- 
stoee topjisd wtr on her. The woman 
tasted ^ tte aeddem was a dgad 
thd hff burtoid wnted ter to Jdn hbn 
faBwdfa^y. 

Or hsNV abod the one iavdvhig the 

She sued s m^tacturar d piuur- 
mimdleal ml avitad gootb beca^ 
the adbcdve m» mat to saeive Imt 
putlca hrttiMd bar ridB. She hMt the 
suit and Um drtnae Mom^ ^m- 
paaed a poon to oalsimto Ik^ vtotory . 
OnedMoa read: 

18 »|H 



the dancer who lod 
Was sad and di^uded. 
Bin unlike her hiwyer 
She isn't fid budad. 

ANIMALS FIOURBD hi nuay d 
Aetna's "odd clahna," sudi as the deer 
in Indna uliidi leaped thrmi^ a 
Imiliiias' liNMrt window, kicked the 
reoqitionid mad galloped ov« another 
cmfAqre. 

In Vermont, a poro^hie lundied on 
parte d a man's or, a goat poUdMd ^ 
oother auto's upbdsUry i^ a dog 
(dned on several populsr vdmnes at a 
locd library. 

A New itnttf mim was feedhig t^ 
dieters d a aoo wMo Ms pisses 
d^iped df sod wera swalfowed by me 
d tta iMBtty 



A flsrite aportt flgme attended a 
fo^fld^cvad wiicre he WW atted 
on to wrMle a bemr. He brav^ ac- 
cepted die ekiAaate, bd the bear 
citffed the f ^ow to tbe floor and SM on 
his head. 

A ftad eurlMs Story te^gres a 
ddnw form. M wm Mai eat By a 
Wari^ a« aftd liwhi^pd ttw Mis for 
Ms iidfo's pra^Mcy. b ttia hex ai^fev 
r or aet fte ^Mn wtt roMiA to 

lafllef I 



T 



....Ja 



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maa^Ba 



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Pagi 2-Tho Sun-WadneKlay, January 2, 1974 



Editorial: 



'-t. 



Neighborhood recycling centers are a crying need 



Virginia Beach is rlipidly becoming a trashy 
city. To conserve fuel, the cft^^ refjuse division 
has cut trash pidc-ups from twice to oncfi) iweek. 

On htish pick-up days, residential streeu are 
' lined with overflowing garbage cans and plastic 
garbage bags. Many residents have discovered 
that plastic bags are not animal-proof, and the 
nei^iborhood cbgs are having a field day tearing 
open the bags and scaflering trash and garbage 
before the city refuse trucks arrive. ■*- --.S 

llie city has appealed to residi^iMo1imi|J|eir^ 
trash output by making fi&riise of garrage 
disposals and by using newspapers as fir^lace 
fuel. 

It's all well and good to appeal to the civic 
pride of our citizens and ask them, to limit ttieir 
trash output, but we wqnderliflitr ro| 
have neiUier garbage disposals nor ; 
di^)06&Qf the evw-i^iNl^ing refuse. 

'pPrp^LING CENTERS could be the answer 
tnariy of the city's tradh-coUection woes. If 
there were numerous neighborhood recycling 




centers, rraidents might be happy to have a 
place nearby to take their paper, cans and 
bottles while waiting for the once-a-week dty. 
trash collection. 

It would be in the city's interest to help 
establish neighborhood recycling centos. The 
mwe recycHng centers there are, the less trash 
the refuse division must ccmtend with. And the 
leass^trashi; tibe 1^ fuel the city's trucks must 
^ iiuii^iiu; it. 

recycling operation is long 
overdue in Virginft Beach. Tlie nearest centei^ 
are the two operated by ECOS, a non-pnrfit 
group of Old Dominion University students and 
faculty interested in cleaning up Tidewater's 
environment, 




Ciiyside 



BfUndamhr 



Council checks 
with wives first 

Is the Virginia Beach City Council composed of 
eleven male chauvinists? Or will the group support 
equal rights for women? If you want the answer, it 
might t«e best to check with their wives. 

The Equal Rights Amendment (ERA) is 
scheduled to hit the General Assembly floor again 
this next session. Last week, the council W9S 
{x-esented with a resolution by Vera Henderson, 
vice-president of the Virginia Beach Chapter of the 
National Organization for Women (NOW), asking 
fm* their suppot-t of the ERA. (Virginia Beach 
representatives to the General. Assembly have 
already said they would support the amendment, 
but as one councilman pointed out, they promised 
their support under campaign pressure.) 

The council listened patiently to Ms. 
Henderson's arguments for the ERA and deferred' 
the resolution for consideration. 

In the informal session Mayor Robert Cromwell 
told his fellow councilmen, "I've got to ask my wife 
if I'm for it," as the others nodded and smiled. 

"I understand Mr. Scott's wife said she didn't 
want to lower herself that far— equal with men that 
is," said Councilman George Ferrell. 

At any rate, the council may now hold a public 
hearing to see what the residents of the Beach have 
to say about the ERA— that is after they check with 
their wives. Well, you've heard of "the woman 
behind the man..." 



At Thursday's Virginia Beach, City Council 
meeting, a resolutim was introduced to correct a 
zoning matter that the council voted on in June. The 
resolution was read, and Mayor Robert Cromwell 
called for a motion. Most of the council looked 
puzzled by the whole matter. 

"I'll make the motion, but I don't know what to 
say," said Councilman George Ferrell. 

The city clerk read the motion from the agenda. 

"You did pretty good on that," said Councilman 
Charles Gardner to Mr. Ferrell. "I'll second the 
motion." — '—^' ' 



^ OfiECOS CENTER is in Norfolk arid the other 
ii),|^brtsmouth. In these days of limited fuel, we 

'^wonder how many Virginia Beach residents 
would want to drive to Ncn^olk or Portsmouth 
with their reqycleable trash. 

Daniel Steiner, one of the founders of ECOS, 
says that the operation runs on a small profit 
margin. ECOS has proved that recycling centers 
can make money, even if the profit is slight. 
ECOS turns all of its profits back into the 
centers. 

With the city's help, either in the form of 
mcmetary subsidies or the provision of rent-free 
buildings or warehouses, it might be profitable 
for civic-minded groups, such as the Jaycees, 
Lions, gardra clubs or civic leagues, to establish 
recycling centers in Virginia Beach. 

\ VIRGINIA BEACH citizen who 



The council finally got around to making 
appointments to the planning commissitm Jast 
week. Among the appointments was civic leader 
Sam Houst(»i. Mr. Houston, the immediate, past 
president of the Council of Civic Organizations, is 
always an active and very vocal participant at- 
council meetings when it comes to a controversial 
issue in the city. 

Granted, Mr. Houston is probably more than 
qualified for the post (and he is probably more 
informed about city development than some councils 
members) but one may wonder exactly why Mr. 
Houstm got the appointment. Was it really because 
(he council felt he was the most qualified, or did 
they just want to get him off their backs? 

kkkkkkkkk 

Closed sessions seem to be popular with the city 
council. TTie council met in closed session to disctKS 
the planning commission appointments. While the 
Freedom of Information Act allows them to discuss 
"personnel" matters behind closed doors, they 
have to vote in the public formal session. 

And while the councilmen may swear they don't 
vote In those closed sessions, one may wonder what 
all the little charred {»eces of paper were doing in 
the ash tray after Thursday's executive session to 
"discuss" a[^intm«its. 

"Oh, that's just the paper the names were 
submitted «i," said one councilman. 




DAVm R. KAR 



KKAL BRITTON SIMS 



tONHMLEAOLOAnR MATTHEW 0. 6IK0N 



MMESC. 




MACN ruaUSMMG OORmUTION 
UinaimiMRaid 

^n i g iiii i i gii. vi i i iHMOwa 



conscientiously saves recycleable materials on 
his own would be hard-fN'^sed to find either the 
storage room or the gasoline to g^ the materials 
to the businesses in Tidewater which will pay 
him for his efforts. 

.He could save all his newspapers and take 
thatn to Atlantic Paper Stock Co. in Norfolk 
which pays 60 cents per himdred pounds, hardly 
a profit-making effort for one individual. Or he 
could take them all the way to Chesapeake where 
Jhe would get 50 cents per pound from 
Environmental Recycling Cwpr 

He could take his all-aluminum cans to 
Hoffman Beverage Co. in Virguiia Beach where 
he wotuld be paid 10 cents per pound. In Norfolk, 
Norfolk Beverage Co. will pay the same rate. Or 
he could take the cans to the Reynolds Aluminum 
Co. mobile unit which visits Portsmouth's Mid- 
City Shopping Center and Norfolk's Military 
Circle Shotting Center every other Saturday. 

IF HE WERE a Miller's beer drinker, he could 
take his beer t)ottles to Norfolk Beverage Co. 
where he would be paid oae cent per 12-ounce 
botUe. 

The Norfolk Beverage Co. was required to 
obtain special Alcoholic Beverage Controf 
(ABC) Board permission to buy back empty beer 
bottles. The company has agreements with all 
store chains in Tidewater that the stores will buy 
back Miller's bottles directly from consumers. 

However, a beverage company spokesman 
said most stor^ are reluctant to buy back the 
bottles since the stcnres lack storage space for 
than. 

Ilie Miller Brewing Co.'s bottle buy-back 



policy is a st^ in the right direction 9nd an 
examfde to other brewing companies that they 
should buy back their own bottles. / 

To make the process easier on the consumer, 
the customer should be able to return the bottles 
to the store where they were purchased, rath&r i 
than to the distribute. / 

SINCE TIDEWATER has no recycling pla^ ' 5 
at all, a coitral recycling cwiter where large s 
amounts of paper, glass and cans can/be^ 
collected is sorely' needed. Since Virginia 
residents cannot be expected to drive to ECOS' 
two sites, it makes sense to start some ECOSflike 
centers in the city. 1 

Collection points for the city's recycling 
centers could be set up in parking lols of 
convenioice stores and grocery stores whiiah sell 
many bottled products. Frdm those pbints, 
recycleable materials c(Mild be collected and 
taken to a central warehouse where they are 
bundled or packaged for shipment to recycHng 
plants. V 

Tlie key to the success of recycling centers is to 
make it almost as'easy for consumers^ to use the 
centers as it is for them to haul their trash out to 
the curb for the city to pick up. 

. If a large number of neighborhood recycling 
collection points were established and evenly 
distributed throughout the city's boroughs, 
Virginia Beach would lose its trashy look, the 
city would save fuel and some civic-minded 
groups could be adding extra income to their 
treasuries while keeping the world's largest 
resort city a little cleaner. 



Forum 




e for increased bonding? 



Thli week Fornm is devoted to prewnting both tides of tlie 
issue of tiie proposed cliarter cliange to allow for an increase 
in Uie city's iMinding capacity. Sun SUff Writer Linda MiOer 
tallied with prqMinents and opponents of the issue and these 
are their comments. A public heartpg on the charter change 
will be held Monday, with the deadline for filing all charter 
changes to be voted on during the next session of the General 
Assembly set for Jan. 1*. 



Councilnian Curtis Payne, who does not favor the 
.. refo-endum for this increase, says he's afraid "the public 
TRiight be inclined to go against it since everyone is afraid of a 
tax tocrease. But, we're (the city) at a stage in our growth 
where we need the increase. Certainly we're (the council) not 
going to just go out and sell all the bonds just because we 
have the authority." 






Pro 






Tlie (^ty needs a cba^«!r change now to allow for increased 
' ftaidii for capita! iAprovyaents lii the cry from meihlMf iT^ 
the Virginia Beach City Council and the city staff. But, only 
one member of the city's del^ation to the General Assembly 
will go along with them without first holding a voter 
referendum. 

"An increased bonding capacity is a necessity if Virginia 
Beach is going to pontinue to supply the essential services, 
such as water and sewer, highways and schools to its 
citizens," says Mayor Robert Cromwell. "It is also essential 
if there is going to be adequate planning for the future growth 
of the city. What people don't realize is that Virginia Beach 
has to stay way ahead on paper. Projections for schools, fire 
and police protection and studies for future highways have to 
be done now. Then you've got to be able to finance what you 
plan." 

"I personally don't4igree with the idea that you need a 
referendum for this type of increase," says Mayor Cromwell. 
' The greatest safeguard the people have is the election of the 
council. If a councilman votes for excessive bonding then the 
people shouldn't vote for him in the next election. I'm not for 
giving the city government carte blanche bonding power, but 
I feel the bankers' proposal for a total debt limit equal to 10 
per cent of the real, estate value is a good compromise 
(t>etween City Manager Roger's Scott's proposal of annual 
limit of two per cent of the real estate value«nd the present 
$7 million annual limit). It is a sound proposal which should 
meet present needs and dtill maintain our credit rating." 

ALinoUGH City Manager Roger Scott originally 
recommended a less conservative bonding limit, he feels the 
banlters' recommendation "is more flexible than what we 
have. I think we can work with those boundaries." 

The council, in adopting the banker's proposal at their Dec. 
17 meeting, instructed Mr. Scott to review his five-year 
Capital Improvements Program and outline which projects 
should receive priority and which projects could be deferred. 

Mr. Scott, however, feels "the setting of priorities is going 
to have to be done jointly by the council and staff because 
those changes are going to have direct effect mi their areas of 
interests and their boroughs." ' ^ 

WHILE THE entire council favors the bonding increase. 
Vice-mayor Reid Ervin feels "based on what I think is 
necessary (in the Capital Improvements Program), evoi the 
committe«|'s recommendatton may be a bit more than we 
really have to have." Del. Donald Rhodes agrees with him. 

Vice-mayor Ervin proposes to take the Capital 
Improvements Program, find out exactly how many of the 
projects are essential right now and provide an increase to 
meet those needs. 

"It's the revalue gap that we're trying to take care of," 
Mr. Ervin says. "We can delay or defer projects thataroi't 
absolutely necessary at this time. I think, realistically, the 
present $7 million limit diould be increased to about $10-12 
million a year, and that wpuld satisfactorily relieve the gap 
in funds needed for essoitial projects." v 

DEL. RHODES also feels that the $5 millitm increaw is all 
the city probaldy needs at this time, and unlike the rest of the 
General Assembly delegation, he is not convinced Uiat a 
referendum is necessary. He remains "opoi^ninded" on the 
question of holding a referendum for any bonding increase. 

According to Del. Rhodes, there are three altonatives : for 
the peofrie to do without the necessary roads and capital 
improvements; for the city to finance capital improvemoits 
with a reasonatrie increase in bonding limitatitHis; and for 
the city to fmance projects out of current revenues (which 
would mean holding a referendum for all (Hvjects exceeding 
the 17 million annual limit). 

Recoitiy retired from the Virginia Beach city council, Del. 
Rhodes states "I've said from the outset that the current 
level rixMild be Increased to provide $12 million a year. If the 
percentage were 1.2& per cent of the assessed value of real 
estate, it woidd produce about $12 million in bonding 
authority next year." 

6EL RHOSBB addCTtateloliaurpe^^say poUtlcs 
h«Ve gotten involved here. We're talking about taking care of 
the needs of the people. And I suppcse some people will say 
on that basis Uie people ought to vote on the matter, but the 
pei^e do vote on the cmmcilmen every two years." 

Mott of the couxdlmoi, too, feel it riiould be up to the city 
council to make a responsible decision. They add that U^re is 
a "dire need" U« the pn^waed incr^oe to 10 per cent td the 
aM»eueA value. For any additional increase, however, they 
•U favor go^ l^^ou^the refenaikni pneednre. 



COUNCILMAN John Baum feels that just the quMBontli^ 
whether the increase should be a council decision or should 
call for a referendum "indicates a lack of faith in the council. 
And I'm not going to say that maybe sometimes the people 
aren't justified in losing faith." 

He states, "The only way we're going to bridge the gap 
between the coundl and piAIlc; and show them the council is 
responsible is to come up with a revised Capital 
Improvements Program." Mr. Baum proposes, "If the 
Gcnoral Assembly passes the increase, the council should ^ 
then hold public hearings on the 'Capital Improvements 
Program to see which projects the people feel should receive 
priority." 

"The problem with « referendum in Virginia beach is that 
there are so many communities, and the people think only in 
terms of what the increase will do for their community. The 
council has to think in terms of what's best for the total city of 
Virginia Beach," says Mr. Baum. 

IN AN EFFORT to restore some of that public confidence, 
the council has agreed with a proposal from Councilman Dr. 
Garence Holland to require that all future , capital im- 
provement authorizations be approved by a two-thirds vote 
of the council rather than just by a simple majority. (That 
wotdd mean there woijld be no more 6 to 5 splits on council 
votes for psojects. To pass, a project would have to be ap- 
j>roved by a vote of not less than 8 to 3.) . 

Pertlaps the council's feeling could best be summed up in 
the words of (^uncilman Charles Gardner who says, "If we 
don't have an increase, a lot of needed projects are simply 
going to go down the drain." 

The ccftmcil will hear public opinion on the proposed bon- 
ding increased at 2 p.m. Monday in the council chambers. If 
they are to revamp their proposal, or whatever their final 
decision is any charter change must be filed by Jan. 16. 



While the Virginia Beach City Council and the city 
manager's staff argue thatxhe city cannot continue to func- 
tion.f$,.its present rate of growth without a substantial in- 
ct^R in the bonding capacity, two of four state represen- 
tatives (Del. Glenn McPanan and Sen. A. Joseph Canada) 
see it as a question that should first go to a vote of the people, 
and a third (Del. Owen Pickett) awaits the outcome of a 
public hearing Monday. 

Perhaps the most vocal on the bon^g issue, Del. 
McClanan has maintained that "any charts- change of this 
magnitude should be ap|»t>ved by a voter referendum." Both 
he and Sen. Canada have said they would not support the 
proposal fqr a bonding change in the General Assembly 
unless a referendum was held. Del. Pickett states he "\i not 
prepared to say that a referendum is a necessity" and has 
adopted a "wait and see" attitude toward the proposal, at 
least iffltil afto- Monday's public hearing. 

AU three opposed a recommendation from City idanager 
Roger Scott calling for retaining an annual bonding ceiling, 
but raising it from the p-esent $7 million to an amotmt equal 
to two per cent of the value of the city's real ratate. (With the 
real estate assessment presently at about $1 billkin, Scott's 
in^posal would mean the city could borrow next year as 
mudi as $20 million, and that amount would increase each 
year with the value of real estate, up to the state limit of $180 
millk>n a year.) ' 

THE THREE delegates, however, basically agrekl with a 
proposal from the special bankers' committee appointed to 
study the city's financial state and need. The banken' plan 
would eliminate the annual restriction, but would limit total 
debt to an amoimt equal to 10 pa- cent of the assessed value of 
real estate or six per coit of true value. (Real »tate is 
presently assessed at 60 per cait of true value. ) The proposal 
would allow the city a total debt (rf $100 million, based on 
current real e^te value. 

Dd. McClanan has no qualms with the bankers's proposal, 
saying he finds it "smoKi from the fiscal standpoint." He 
adds, hovtever. "that it still doesn't answer the questions of 
wheQier the votCTS have a ri^t to approve what they want 
and disai^irove what they don't want." 

"Ife oonc^of theiMmkers' recom m e B d ati oH of t ying it 
all to true marl^ value is a good idea," says Del. McOanan. 
"&tt, I don't want to take the iamtt away from the voto-s." 

SEN. CANADA concur that the bankers' committee has 
done "an ekceUent job, but the po^e have a right to vote on 
it." 

Berth men feel the city has had ample time to presoit the 
issue to the voters and to find out how the dtinxoiry feels. 
Tliey sa^ the iHt^usal cofa&A ea^y have beeo piioed <» the 



November ballot at no additional expense to the city. 

"They (the city staff) started the entire thing (the bonding 
increase) two to three months before the election," says Del. 
McClanan. "The entire procedure has been wrong. The 
matter ^ould first go to a public hearing and then to a vote. 
The whole way it's been handled makes even 'the public 
hearing perfunctory." 

Del. McClanan refers to the mayor's announcement at the 
pec. 17 council meeting that the councibnen have^dopted the 
bankers committee's recommendation even though the public 
hearing on the issue is not scheduled until Monday. 

"IT SOUNDS GREAT to say the city's progress is being 
impeded, but there's no track record that the voters are 
disapproving city projects,," says Del. McQanan. "They 
haven't had a chance to vote for or against many issues." 

Del. McClanan sees the city's hest alternative at this point 
as "getting in the mill a referendum request for whatever it 
is they want." 

He adds, "It might pass, but I'm inclined to think it would 
not pass. That's why I feel so strong about it." 

Sen. Canada states that during preparations for the merger 
between the old Princess Anne County and the Virginia 
Beach resort city that the county's biggest objection was the 
past debt incurred by the resort city. "It (the limit and 
referendum procedure) was placed in the city charter for 
that reason, and I've talked to many people and majority of 
them feel it should go before th&voters." 



"THEY DIDN'T need to be in this crunch, if one exists," 
says Del. McQanan. "And they (the city) say leave it to the 
council, but some councilmen didn't even know it was to be 
discussed (referring to the council's meeting with delegates 
to the general assembly last week)." 

Del. Pickett is more concerned with the "purposes for the 
which the funds are to be used" than the pros and cons of 
having a referendum. He feels some provision in the city 
charter should allow for an initiative referendum, but 
"historically, the matter has not always gone to referendum, 
as with the bonding increase in 1972." . 

He hopes to gather public opinion on (he proposal at 
Monday's hearing, but says whether he will support the in- 
crease will "depend on the final amounts of funds and the 
limitations we are talking about. If we're talking about 
categorically giving the city a gr^nt with no further 
restrictions, then I cannot support that." 

The final filing date for city charter changes is Jan. 16. As 
it stands now the city will not get the change if Sen. Canada 
and Del. McOanan have a say about it, and without further 
revision in the proposal even Dd. Pickett will not support the 
bonding increase. 



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Life Styles 



The Sun-ttedoMdty, Jamiiry 2, 1974-^9t> 



Biym 




1 



Finney-Hrcks 



James Bary^obinson 
Catholic Chapel was the setting 
Saturday for the marriage of 
LeAnn Marie Hicks and Ens. 
David Fulton Finney. 



The bride is the daughter oltv|jgj|,^ggaglj^ 



Mn.Le^ 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert Kenneth 
Hicks of Virginia Beach. The 
bridegroom is the son of Ken- 
neth T. Finney Jr. of Stoughton, 
MasSi 

Heidi Hicks was her sister's 
maid of honor. Bridesniaids 
were Carol Tate and Kathie 
Coleman. 

Mark JoUie was best man. 
Ushers were Robert Finney and » 
Lt. Robert E. Owens. 

The couple will reside in 
Virginia Beach. 

Levin-Talley 

The marriage of Bai-bara 
Anne Talley and Martin Glenn 
Levin took place Saturday at 
Ohef Sholom Temple, Norfolk. 

The bride is the daughter of 
Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Jefferson 
Talley of Virginia Beach. The 
bridegroom is the son of Mrs. 
Meyer Smith of Columbus, 
Ohio, and the late Samuel 
Levin. 

Tlie couple will reside in 



T 



Births 



Mr. andl^rs. Joseph Graham 
Beale, Daughter. 

Mr. and Mrs. Thomas M. 
Benlaminson, son. 

Mr. and Mrs. l^eonard 
McCoy, Jr., son 
* Mr. and Mrs. Karl M. Leidig, 
Son. 

Mr. and Mrs. Arthur T. Knox 
Daughter. 

^r. and Mrs. Olin Lee 
^baugh. Son. 

Mr. and Mrs. John Larry 
Peacock, Daughter. 

Mr. and Mrs. Ernest Dale 
Coster, Daughter. 

Mr. and Mrs. James Long 
Kinnamon, Son. 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert Fay 
Benson, Son. 

Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Clifford 
Bohiing. Son. 

Mr. and Mrs. Thortias Cornell 
Berry, Jr., Daughter. 

Mr. and Mrs. Cristian Van 
Walters, Daughter. 

Mr. and Mrs. Jgi]rif»:,y,..«OP'"'^ 
Minnick, Daughter. 
Mr. and Mrs. Gary Arlon 

Silver, Son. 

Dr. and Mrs. Sidney K. 
Denny, Son. 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert C. Teets, 

win Daughters. 
-Mr. and Mrs. Edwin Lyie 
^AcNelly, Son. 

Mr. and Mrs. Randy G. 
tyron. Son. 

Mr. and Mrs. Ellis E. Martin, 
Son. 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert Alan 

hase, Son. 

Mr. and Mrs. William Vann 
Streeter, Daughter. 



Byrd-Daniel 

Sheryl Kay Daniel was wed to 
James Allen Byrd Saturday at 
the Little Creek Naval 
Amphibious Base Chapel. 

The bride is the daughter of 
Mr. and Mrs. E. L. Hines of 
Virginia Beach. The 
bridegroom is the son of Mr. and 
Mrs. Edwin James Byrd of 
Chesapeake. 



MteCdMn 

Faye Daniel was her sister's 
maid of honor. Bridesmaids 
wwe Betty Sue Daniel' and 
Joyce Ann Byrd. 

Edwbi James Byrd was his 
son's best man. Ushers were 
Bruce arid Gary Daniel, Danny 
Shipley and Ray Fletcher. 

The couple will ' reside in 
Virginia Beach. ^ 

Colsen engagement 

Mr.andMrs.DonaldFredColsen 
of Virginia Beach announce the 
engagement of their daughter, 
Pamela Jean Colsen, to Edwin 
Charles Stephens, son of Mr. 
and Mrs. Horace Franklin 
Stephens of Mims, Fla. 

The bride-to-be is a graduate 
of Kellam High School and is 
currently attending Longwood 
College. Her fiance is also a 
graduate of Kellam High School 
and is currently attending 
Brevard Community College^ 
Cocoa, Fla. 

A June 1 wedding is planned. 



FOR THE FUTURE 

-WAyV WIVES are invited to 
attend the monthly business 
meeting of Navy Wives Clubs of 
Amqiica, Dam Neck No. 207, 
Thursday at 9:30 a.m. in Room 
20? qJT |he Special Services 
Builfjtaig, Agiiai Neck. A free 
nuirsery rWfll be provided. 
Additional information may be 
obtained by calling 42O-10B6. 

A PARTY for handicapped 
chUdrai of the Helping Hand 
Camp will be held Saturday at 1 
p.m. at Lynnhaven Colony, 
United Church of Christ off; 
Great Neck Road. The party 
will be sponsored Hby^tlie^ 
Princess Anne Woman's Club of ' 
Virginia Beach. 

REP. G. WILLIAM 
WHITEHUR8T (R-Va.) will 
speak on "Give Us a King," 
based on a passage in the fh-st 
book of Samuel, Sunday at 7 
p.m. at Khigs Grant Baptist 
Church, 873 Little Neck Road. 
The public is invited to attend. 

A FREE LECTURE on the 
Montessori method of childhood 
education will be sponsored by 
the Prema Dharmasala and 
Fellowship Assn. Monday at 7 
p.m. at the Tidewater Assn. for 
Retarded Children, 906 
Ingleside Road, Norfolk. 

JENNIFER PRICKETT. 

daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Bruce 
L. Prickett of Virginia Beach, 
will visit Virginia Beach high 
schools to answer questions 
about the American University 
of Washington, D. C, where she 
is a sophomore. On Monday she 
will visit First Colonial High 



School at 8 a.m., Cox High 
School at 10:30 a.m. ind 
Bayside High School at 1 p.m.. 
On Tuesday she will visit 
Kellam High School at 8 a.m., 
Kempsville High School at 10 
a.m. and Princess Anne High 
School at 1 <p.m. 

THE YMCA of Norfolk is now 
accepting registrations for 
winter programs to begin 
Monday. Various programs are 
offered for adults and children. 
Additional information may be 
obtained from the YMCA at S22- 



to join the W. W. Houston Boys' 
Club of Norfolk winter swim 
program which begins Tuesday. 
Red Cross water safety in- 
structors will offer instruction 
for beginner, advanced 
beginner, iQtermediate and 
swimmer classifications. Cost 
for each session is |3. Additional 
information may be obtabied 
from the boys club at 855-8908. 



AN Environmental 
meeting on soil, water and land 
developm«it problems in the 
Tidewater area will be held at 
Christopher Newport College, 
Newport News, on Jan. 10 from 
9:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. The 
forum, which is free to the 
public, is designed to acquaint 
elected and appointed officials, 
planners, landowners and 




1615 Pacific Avanu* 42S- 1 776 




(it) 



ORIENTAL ARTS & CURIOS 



425-9335 



HOURS: 10 am. TO 5:00 p.m. 
CLOSEQSUN.bMON. 



716 FIRST COLONIAL 
HILLTOP WEST 

(Behind McUon^ld.s on Laskin Kd.) 



NASSAU 

TROPICAL PLANTS 



Wlifii yoii want to (jivo sumethiiicj I 
to iiivi! nlt'iiMiH.', select d bijiuitiful li 



499-7444 



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BIG BROTHERS HELP 
FATHERLESS BOYS 

Hundieds of fatheiless l>oys in our city need the 

Sidance of a man. Presently waiting foi a Big 
oOm are diirty-one (31) boys-one is waiting 
for you. If you want to share your time with a 
t>oy who needs a special friend - Call - Big Bro- 
dim of VngiiuaBeKh 425-0880 



;\si^ III \\N 



SIMIELE FUNERAL HOME 



I \l I \!i;-^ MCI 1)1! P 
IJ l\M i,\ id \\l) 



tjfi A GEORGE ROT HIIL FIM O^ 

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A mCHAJ^^ D /ANUCK [>ll«VOym^S(MAtlON 



...c«it 
takes is 
ollWe 
Confidence 




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- ■ 8 It avi MCHAti & JIAIA PHIU»^ 
:,, ;P0 ^ — W] 



3ND nCOm SMAKINO 
WIIK 




Different 
hopes 

fordinerent 
„ Mks. 




People want different 
things from a rollt^e 
education. 

But they all s^ree 
on one thing. It takes 
more than brains to 
get a diploma. * 

Why not make the 
burden a little easier? 
Start buying U.S. 
Savings Bonds now. 

Bonds are a depend- 
able way to build a 
Oillege fund for your 
children. And an easy 
way to start saving 
them is by joining the 
Payroll Savings Plan. 

Start a college fund 



now with U.S. Savings 
Bonds. They just might 
let your kids spend more 
time studying and less 
time working to stay in 
school— whatever they 
hope to be. 




TMce . 
. sitodk . 

Buy U. S. Siivuijiii HiiiMb 



AUDITIONS for the Kellam^ 
^and Parents' annual talent 
show will be held ^onttoy and 
Jan. 14 at 7:30 p.m. at Kellam 
High School. Auditioning fees 
are $2 per person or $S per 
group. The show will be held in 
March. Additional information 
may be obtained by callhig 340- 
7709 or 3404611. 

BOYS ages 7 to 16 are invited 



^ ; 1.*'iiiivelopers with environmental 
SEN. A JOSEPH CAnAda •Aspects of urb«nizatioR.^i . ^ 
will outline his stand against a '^ ^ . 
city charter change on bonding ART NOSTALGIA will be 
limits at Tuesday's meeting of offered Jan. 23-25 when the 
the Princess Anne Plaza Civic Vlrghiia Museum's-ArtlBobile 
League, 7:30 ,Bjn. at Ptezr^collection of 



JunisrH^SirSchool. 

SENIOR CITIZENS are in- 
vited to participate in a con- 
sumer education program 
starting' Jan. 9 at the Coiter 
Theatre of the City Arena in 
Norfolk. Programs will be held 
on the second Wednesday of 
each month at 1:30 p.m. All 
area senior citizens are invited 
to attend. 



art nouveau 



arrives at Virginia Wesleyan 
College. The traveling exhibit, 
open to the public at no charge, 
may be viewed on the campus 
from 2 to 6 p.m. Jan. 23; 9 a.m. 
to.noon, 1 to 5 p.m. and 7 to 9 
p.m. Jan. 24, and 9 a.m. to noon 
Jan. 25. 



For that personal touch 



LET Ml 

ANSWER 

YOUR 

PHONEI 




<flLL-4M-S600 

VIRGINIA BEACH— 2407 Pacific Avf. 
Teltphone Answering Strvict Co. 



Visit Tlie World Baiaar 

For on enjoyobi* odvanture in sating unusual 
and expertly' crofted boutique merchandise 
from countries all over the world. Many you 
would never see even though you traveled 
abroad. 



WOUD MZAAI IS « neiSTiltD TMOMAIM OF MUMFOID INC 
ST0R|,MQU8S: M««- SA 10«0 a.m.. 10:00 i>.m. 

iNMIUTARY CttCLi SNOPMNC MALL 

Virginto leach Mvd. Ii MUKory Highway 420-7097 







C\iU\Cav\ 



HI At 1 N SAI 0\S 




Shampoo S Sat From $3.25 

Complal* Permdhent Waves $6.95 to $19,95 

Roux Fanci-Ton* Touch-up.. From $5.00 

Roux Frosting (Sjhampoo S Set Extra) $13.50 

Hoircuf $2.75 

^No Appuiiitment Nccesmry-Juit Come In " 



DAILY -9 'til 6 



THURS. - 9 'til 9 



Hilltop Plaza Shopping Cantar 
Laskin Rd. Naxt to Safaway 
Ptionat 428-9897 
Va. Baach 



5118 Va. Baach nivd. 
Acrosi from QEX 
Phonei 497-976» 
va. Boacn 



1734 E. 

LIttia Craak Rd. 
Next to Zayrat 
Phona> SBB-9093 
Norfolk 



After Sunset 4 



ii 



High Spots 

at Night Spots 

in Tidewater 

maininiiuimmii 

The Shack, an establishment 
of 4 years, is known by the 
Locals as "THE PLACE IN 
VIRGINIA BEACH". An Early 
Poverty decor gives this 
favorite night spot a friendly 
and comfortable atomsphere. 

Managed by Jimmy Sellers, 
Cannon and Jack Bellis, 
The $hack features spe- 
cials 4 ni^ts a week: Mon- 
day night, Begins the week 
with the Winter steak special - 
salad, French Fries, 6 oz. Steak 
and beverage - ALL FOR ONLY 
^.50 Tuesday Night features 
Ski Flicks beginning at 9. 
Thursday Night is Ladies Night 
- Special 5 for 1. (Sorry, 
LADIES ONLY). Sunday 
Special - 5 for 1 from 3 to 6. 

The Shadu, located at 21g-17th 
St. is opm from 6 to 1 AM. Mon. 
thru Sat ; and 3 to 1 PM on Sun. 
It promises to be a night filled 
with excelloit food, beverage, 
and fun! 



This entire ispace consists of paid advertising 

HAPPY 

NEW 

YEAR 

FROM 

THE — 

LYNNHAVEN 

LOUNGE 




HHIiniiniUllllJIflllll 



THE STOWE AWAY: FeatiffM 
SKI NIGHT evwy Thursday 
Night, with Ski Fikns beginning 
at 9 P.M. TTie SPECIAL for 
SKI NIGHT is 5 for 1. 



THIS WEEK-END- 
THE 
ATLANTIC 
COASTLINE 



Spend a fun-filled evenhig at the 
Lynnhaven Lounge, any 
evening at all. The best in 
Country Rock bands appear 
every Friday and Satitfday 
nights, providing fun and 
dancing for all. This Friday and 
Saturday night, the fantastic 
sounds of the Atlantic 
Coastline win again be heard, 
featuring the singing of Charlie 
Clark and Roger Gray on the 
fiddle. This 6-pc. group really 
swings. Owner Jack Turner wiU 



welcome you any time during 
the week; the Lynnhaven Lounge 
is open from 10 a.m.°to 1 p.m. 
You'll love the entertainment, 
you can quench your thirst attd 
there's always a friendly crowd 
to share your leisure hours with. 
Stop by and see for yourself, 
they're located at the Mini-Mall 
on South Lynnhaven Rd. Take 
Exit 5 off the Expressway. 



'iiuiiiiuiuiiiinnniii 



BLUE PETE'S • Features 
live entertainment ; this Surfdav 
ACT in, from 2 to 6 pm. 

Another special on Sundays, 
Crabs for only $3.50 a dozen. 

Special for duck himtera: 
open 4 a.m. to 8 a.m. Saturday 
for breakfast! 

To find Blue Pete'sFrom Va. 
Beach-down Princess Anne 
Road to Pungo light ; take a left 
on Indian River Rd.east to 
Muddy Creek Rd., bear to left 
on Muddy Creek Rd. From 
Norfolk : Take 64 South to East 
Indian River Rd. Exit, etc 
Pembroke. Independence Blvd. 
to Holland Rd., to Pungo Light, 
etc. The Allantic Coast starts in 
January, Saturdays 2 to p.m. 






-V 



s 




\ 



475 S. LYNNHAVEN ROAD 




MINI-MALL 



340-9547 




Evory Tueidiy N^t n SKI NIGHT At Tlw ^ACK 
- FaMuring SKI FLICKS," Beginning et9p.m.a» 



-^^^^y^^^^-^^vkY^^\-^-^^vi?iji:^^^^:^^>>>j 



m__ Mw Entertainment 

^ "E, ACT III 

^J^ ^^ ^^ Every SuiKlay 

■ C I t 3 2 p.tn. ■ 6 p.m. 

Back Bay ^^^ ^- m*'*^^ ^'^^^ ^^^ 

Marina Restaurant ^""^ 421-2005 
-ALL YOU CAN lAT- 

Thnrs. and Fridaj - Oysters. •3.^* 

Saturday • Steamed Shrimp •4.^ 

%m4ay - Steametf CraK . ..... f3^M 

DUCK HUNTERS 

Open 4 a.m, to 8 t,m. Breakfast Saturday 

Open Sunday-Thursday 1 1 a.m. to Midnight 

Friday and Saturday 12 noon to 1 a.m 



^^^^^_^^^^^^^^^^^g^ 



■■i 



^■MMMlHMtftfHM 



J 



S ports 



Pap 4-The Sun-Wadn«day, January 2, 1974 



District play 

begins Friday 

for Beaqh teams 

The wann-iqM are Over. No Icmger can a coach write 
off a loss as something that doesn't count. The Eastern 
District basketball season b^ins Friday. 

Five Beach teams will take to the courts Friday night 
to b^in their search for a District title. First Cokmial will 
not return to action until Tuesday. 



'■^.\--*- 



FRIOAY'S GAMES 

Bay side at - 
Lake Taylor 



fWff game features a match-up between two of the. 

expected pOwCTS in the Eastern District. Bayside has won 
Uiree> straight in improving their record to 5-2. Lake 
Taylor was bombed by Norcom Saturday night as the 
Titans record droppei to 4-1. * 

Both teams feature exc^tionally tall frontline. The 
Marlins are led by 6'5" Elton Gross and 6'4" Jim Gof- 
figan. Gross is leading the Bayside scoring parade with a 
24.6 points per game average while Goffigan is averaging 
just over 22 points a contest. 

The Titans frontcourt is led by 6*5" Tommy Graves and 
6'5" Willie Harper. The pair of big men carry the bulk of 
the rebounding and 'scoring load for the Titans. 

Bayside Coach Conrad farker seems to have solved 
the problem of a lack of ^ring punch in the backcourt 
with'flie insertion of Rlpky Fletcher into the starting line- 
up. Fletcher gives the Margins much more quickness at 
the guard positkin and he liafs hit for double fi^u^ in each 
of the Marlins last two games. 

In the two games Bayside lost, their backcourt was 
outscored badly. If the Marlins can get some points out of 
their guards and hold their own on the backboards, 
Bayside could get their Eastern District season off on the 
right foot. 

Princess Anne 
at Cox 

This game marks the second meeting for the two teams 
this season. I^incess Anne came out on top in the first 
meeting 83^. Cavalier forwards John Paden and George 
Purdin led the way combining for 51 points. 

Falcon forward John Richards has been more con- 
sistent of late hitting for double figures in two of the 
Falcons last three games. 

Princess Anne is once again a sound well-driHed ball- 
dub. The Cavaliers breezed through the early portion of 
their schedule in 5-1 fashion. The only setback being a 
four-point loss to Bayside. 

Princess Anne has been getting excellent production 
out of Purdin and Paden. Both seniors' averages have 
been hovering right around the 2(Hx>int game mark all 
season. The Cavaliers have been getting excellent bench 
help in the person of Rich Banta. The junior center has hit 
for double figures three times in a reserve role. 

Coach Leo Anthony has been slowly working in a full- 
court press into the Cavalier's repetoire, and it appears to 
be ready for the start of the dHstrict season. In their last 
game against Churchland, the press proved to be the 
difference in the game. 

Cox plays a 2-3 zone which is exceptionally sticky on 
the Falcons smaller home court. The game should be 
much closer than the initial encounter between the two 
teams, but the Cavaliers are deadly outside shooters 
which could spell trouble for Cox's zone defense. 

Kellam at Booker 
T. Washington 

A match-up Between two teams that have gotten off to 
rough starts. Kellam is 1-5 with their only win coming 
against Cox. Booker T. Washington was expected to 
challenge for the district title, but the Bookers dropped 
Uieir first four games. 

The Knights will be at a serious height disadvantage in 
taking on Booker T. Wa^ington. Coach Willie Brey has a 
star of the ftiture in Brian Macon. The 6'4" sophomore had 
his personal varsity high against Oscar Smith, Friday 
with a 21-point effort. The Knights have also been getting 
good scoring production out of forwards Jim Perkins and 
Gary Woodhouse, but unless Kellam's fast break is 
worked to perfection the Knights could be in for a long 
evening. 

Maury at Kempsville 



I 



Maury, the Eastern District favorite, will meet a 
vastly improved Kempsville club. The Chiefs, under 
second-year coach Bill Cochrane, have already equalled 
last year's victory total with their 5-2 start. 

Kempsville is led by senior center Britt Glisson. Tlie 
6'6" Glisson is one of the better big men in the city and is 
averaging close to 20 points a game. Ilie Chiefs have tteen 
receiving excellent floor leadership from guard Billy 
Foster. Foster leads the team in assists and is in- 
strumental in the Chiefs pressure defense. Foryirari 
Oliver Mayfield has been a pleasant surprise so far this 
year. Hie senior has given Glisson needed rebounding and 
scoring help. 

Maury has two of the finest ballplayers in the Eastern 
District in guard Vic Jones and center Fred Hilton. Those 
two players are the reason Maury is favored to take the 
District title. 

Ifow Foster and Glisson fare in their individual match- 
ups with the two Commodore stars will be the key to the 
contest. ^ 

IN ACTION on Tuesday night, Booker T. Washington 
travels to Bayside, Cox is at Maury, Kempsville h<»ts 
First Cotonial, Kellam Is at Oscar Smith, and Princess 
Anne travels to Granby. 





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BAYSIDE DEti'ENDERS drop back into iom 
defense as Great Bridge's Donnie Luster (15) 
brings the ball upcourt. Bayside won the 



semifirfal game of the Bayside Basketball 
Tournament 61-55. (Sun photo by Rod 
Rnudion) 



'^PT^ ^j g to' t.r 



Indian Rivei^tali* 



Bayside wins tourney title 62-59 



By JOHN BANNON 
Sports Editor 

Bayside was not a very 
gracious host. The Marlins won 
their own holiday basketball 
tournament with a 62-59 
triumph over Indian River 
Friday night. 

Bayside had moved into the 
championship round of the 
tourney with a 61-55 first round 
win over Great Bridge. Indian 
River earned their shot at the 
tournament title with an 80-58 
semifinal triumph over Cox. 

Cox took third place in the 
tournament on the strength of a 
66^ overtime win over Great 
Bridge. Forward John Richards 
was the star in the Falcons first 
victory of the season. The 6'3" 
jimior hit an eight-foot turn- 
around from the baseline with 
Great Bridge's Emmanuel 
Upton draped all over him to 
knot the score at 65-65. Richards 
sunk his free-throw to complete 
the three-point-play with only 
five seconds remaining in the 
overtime period. 

A 30-FOOT heave at the 
buzzer by Great Bridge's 
Donnie Luster fell way short, 
and the Falcons had broken a 
seven game victory drought. 

Elton Gross and Jim Goffigan 
once again led the Bayside 
scoring parade with 18 and 15 
points, respectively. However, 

it was little-used reserve 

Tommy Fosky and a seldom 
shooting guard, Ricky Fletcher, 
who came through with the vital 
points down the stretch in the 
Marlins win. 

Leading 54-49 with 4:30 left in 
the game, Bayside Coach 
Conrad Parker inserted Fosky 
into the line-up. "Fosky is a real 
—smart ball-player and the b«t 
foul-shooter on the t^am ", said 
Parker. 

Bayside went to their four- 
comers offense, and thanks to 
the brilliant ball-handling of 
Fletcher stalled for over a 
minute before Goffigan upped 
the Marlin lead to eight points. 

INDIAN RIVER gaanTMilte 
Barefoot hit three straight 20- 
foot jumpers, but Fosky hit two 
free-throws and a lay-up in 
between Barefoot 's long range 
barrage to keep the Marlin lead 
intact. 

The Braves closed to within 
60-57 on a Bernell Riddick 
basket, but two Fletcher free 
throws with :12 left iced the 
game. 



Attacking the backboards 
with vigor, Indian River fared 
well in the opening quarter. 
Four rebound baskets enabled 
the Braves to hold an 18-16 lead 
at the end of the first quarter. 

Bayside's star pivotman 
Elton Gross finally got un- 
tracked at the start of the 
second period. Indian River had 
held the 6'5" senior to only two 
free throws during the opening 
eightminutes. Gross counted on 
three consecutive baskets to 
give Bayside their first lead 
since the early going at 22-20. 
The Marlins retained the slim 
margin for the duration of the 
quarter and went to the locker 
room at halftime with a 34-32 
lead. 

Both teams played cautiously 
in the third quarter with neither 
team being a^le to put together 
any sort of offensive streak. The 
Marlins managed only 12 points 
in the third quarter, hitting on. 
six of 18 field goal attem^r 
Fortunately for Bayside, Indian 
River was even colder from the 
floor. The Braves hit on a 
miserable four of 20 shots in the 
stanza. Bayside held a 46-42 
advantage entering the final 
stanza. 

The Braves could pull no 
closer than three points during 
the final eight minutes. The 
Marlin shooting in the fourth 
quarter was the exact opposite 
of their efforts in the preceeding 
one. Bayside hit on six of eight 
from the floor to ice the victory. 



COX COACH Phil Williams 
finally got his charges to play a 
good third period, and the 
Falcons won one. Great Bridge 
had raced to a 40-29 halftime 
lead, but saw all but one point 
vanish in the face of the furious 
Falcon comeback. 

Cox, led by Randy Robinson, 
who was the game's high scorer 
with 26 points, counted with 22 
third quarter points. Great 
Bridge managed only 12 poims 
as the Falcons 2-3 zone shut off 
the Wildcat efforts. The Falcons 
actually took the lead at 51-50 
when Perry Hill converted a 
steal into a basket, but Len 
Creekmore hit a basket fight at 
the end of the quarter to regain 
the lead for the Wildcats. 

During a hectic fourth 
quarter, the lead changed hands 



seven times. Robinson gave Cox 
their final lead in regulation at 
63-62 with a rebound basket. 
Eric Spellman had a chance to 
win it for Great Bridge, but he 
hit on only the first of a one-one 
situation with three seconds 



remaining in the contest. 

Creekmore hit two from the 
foul line halfway through the 
three minute overtime to give 
the Wildcats their final lead and 
set-up Richards game-winning 
heroics. 




BWSIDK'S DON Harold battles Indian 
River's Steve Pretlow for rebwuid in action 
Friday night. iVIarlins won 62-5!). (Sun photo by 
Rod Boudiffli) 



Grapplers hit mats this Saturday 



Wrestling season gets back 
into full swing this week after 
the slowdown during the holiday 
vacation break. Four dual 
matches are scheduled 
Saturday with all six Virginia 
Beach high schools in action. 

Bayside at Kellam 

Bayside enters the match 
with a 2-2 record while Kellam 
holds a 1-2 mark. Both teams 
comp^ed in the recent* Kdlam 



VIRGINIA 
BEACH 

ENGRAVING 



TROPHY CO. 



TnfUei. naquei^ Awatds 

Machine Ei^ravini! 

Cn^ A. Montfomejy, 

President 

. 4%8 HottMd Rd. Stute C 

499-^41/ 




Christmas Invitational 
Wrestling Tournament. 
Bayside's Terry Haddox (US- 
pound) and Dave Cash (145- 
pound) were individual winners 
in the tournament, while 
Charlie Skipper (185-pound) 
was Kellam's only tint place 
Hnisher in the tournament. 

Kellam's efforts have been 
plagued by injuries so far this 
season, but if the Knights are 
healthy the match should be 
relatively even. 



Kempsville at Cox 

Two undefeated wrestling 

powers meet mthis matcTi. Q>x 

jl^4-0, and Kem|»ville is 2*0-2. 

Cox is coming off a sparkling 
performance in their own 
holiday tournament whae they 
registered six first place 
nnM^. Cox has not been 
t^ted in a dual matdi this 
seasm winning all four match^ 
by comfortable margins. 



Kempsville was idle over the 
holiday break. 'Hie Chiefs last 
match was 26-26 tie with 
Norview on Dec. 19. Kemp- 
sville's early season efforts 
have bcCT plagued by a weak- 
^ness in the upper weights. 

The layoff and the lack of 
strength in the heavier weights 
coutd be too much for the Chiefs 
to overcome. 

First Colonial at l.ake Taylor 

First Colonial has fared 
suprisingly well during the 
early going. The Patriots 
currently hold a 2-2 dual match 
record^ 

In their last dual match. First 
Colonial upset highly rat«l 
Princess Anne 31-18. The 
Patriots fared well in (he 
Kellam wr«tling tournament 
with Freeman Gregg (138- 
poiffld) and Jerry Pontes (IK- 
potud) grabbing individual 
iKMiors. 

First Coio^al could be an ^ 

anrf #'nm in« Ipaf" in that IPa«l*»*» 



District. Lake Taylor could be 
in for more than they bargained 
for. 

Norview at Princess Anne 

These two teams are coming 
off completely opposite tour- 
nament performances. Norview 
failed to impress fans during 
the Kellam tournament, while 
the Cavaliers were the only 
team to offer Cox much 
resistance difflng the latters 
tournament. 

Princess Anne has a 2-1 dual 
match reojrd with wins over 
Maury and Booker T. 
Washington. Ken Nowlin is a 
stale cTiampioiS at W pbuS^K; 
Ffcrview has ali%ady met two 
other Beach t^ms this seasim. 
The Pilots defeated Kellam 
h^dily. but managed only a tie 
against Kem|Kville 

Both teams are expected to 
dtallcmge Ctox in the Ea^em 
District and this is an imprntant 
early season test for teth 
xnuMh 




SIDEUNES 

Jolm 
Bannon 

Sporti Editor 



i ii Vi 



Waters sheds 
fall-guy rap 

The Dallas Covibim did not earn much respect 
for their performl»ce in their 27-10 loss to 
. Minnesoil m Sunday's NFC championship game. 
Their offeiise brought back memories of a quote 
from a Dallas sportswriter following a similar 
Cowboy performance. "The Cowboy offense is so 
comfdicated only the opposing team's def«ise 
knows where the play is going." 

The Dallas defense wasn't much better, but 
much-maligned comerback Charlie Waters may 
have finally cleared his name. Recently, Waters' 
efforts have meant doom for the Dallas Doomsday 
defence. At times, Waters seemed to be on a one- 
man campaign to put the bomb back in football. 
NFL quarterbacks had labeled the Moisive 
territory he patrolled as friendly. Opposing teams 
concentrated their attack at Waters zone so much 
that the other Cowboy comerback, Mel Renf ro, was 
lonlier than the local Maytag repairman. 

On Sunday, the Vikings found Waters to be better 
than his weak-link reputation. Waters played an 
almost flawless game at comerback, and grabbed 
wiiat could have been a key interception if it were 
not for the Cowboys fumbling offense. 
' In fact, it was All-Pro Renfro and not Waters that 
Fran Tarketon and John Gilliam victimized on 
their 54-yard touchdown pass. Maybe, the years are 
beginning to catch-up with Renfro and in coming 
seasons he might not be quite so lonely. 






SHOULD CURT GOWDY ever need to go job 
hunting, the Miami Dolphins should hire him as a 
cheerleader. Gowdy seems to feel all Miami has to 
do is throw their cleats on^the field and the other 
team will roll over and play dead. It is my 
contention that a team, even if it has clinched a 
playoff berth, that can lose 16-3 to the Baltimore 
Colts is still a long way from walking on water. 

For the Super Bowl, my only hopes are that the 
game will be more competitive than those in the 
recent past, that the best team will win and may 
the best team be th^ Vikings. 



COX^ITWDY ROBINSON has good reason to 
believe,there is a conspiracy among public address 
announcers against him. At the Falcons final 
football game of the 1973 season against Western 
Branch, all the seniors were introduced to the 
crowd except one — Randy Robinson. 

At the Sun Bowl, the Coaches All- City football 
team was introduced. And you guessed if — 
Robinson's name was given the oversight 
treatment by an announcer again. 

Robinson's athletic exploits have not gone 
unnoticed though. The senior was an All-City 
selection at both fullback and defensive end in 
foot ball and is Cox's leading basketball scorer with a 
20-plus average per game. 



0<l*»<^»<l<^<^ 



WRESTLING HAS come into its own in Virginia 
Beach, if the attendance at last weekend's Cox 
wrestling tournament is a true reading of local fan 
interest. Despite, competing with the Peach -Bowl 
and Gator 'Bowl on successive nights, the 
tournament drew exceedingly well. 

In fact, attendance at the Cox tournament 
surpassed attendance at the Bayside basketball 
tournament across town. It could be a sign of the 
times. 



TIIF, GROUP OF officials who worked Sunday's 
Minnesota Viking - Dallas Cowboy match-up are in 
need of a refresher course.When my wife, who is 
just this side of blind, spots a penalty which the 
officials somehow overlooked, it may be time'for 
those same officials to re-evaluate their 
competency at their profession. 



Top Beach athletes sign 
college football grants 



I 

4 



It is open season on high 
school football players for the 
collie recruiter. Over the past 
two weeks three city football 
players signed football aUilelic 
scholarships. 

Princess Angfe'si^Yank Holley 
became the first local athlete to 
sign with a ma;^r CMllege. 
Holley signed an atletic grant 
with Duke University Friday. 
The 8'1" senior was a starter 
both ways at tackle for Ralph 
Gahagan's Cavaliers. Duke 
recruited Holly as a pMsible 
offensive tackle. 

FirM .Cokmial quarte-back 
OirislN^ecta- ami trammate 

B«fpw Rawvw •iitBwl ii>iik 



Appalacian Statelsst week. The 
two signings brings the total to 
three First Colonial football 
players receiving college 
scholarships. Tackle Mike 
Hughes had signed earlier with 
Virginia Tech. 

Bomyst was the Patriots 
steadiest ballorrier averaging 
over four yards a carry. 
Swecker was near the top in the 
Eastern District passing 
statistics. His best game was 
against Granby Mien Massed 
for 2«fi yards and ti»Q touch- 
(townsrror his performMice in 
that contest. Swecker was 
named Player of the Wert^ 









,^' 



The Sun— Wedmsday, January 2, ii>/4-Faga 5 



6> Wrestlers win 



Lox dominates tourney 



By^OHN BANNON 

^rts Editor 

t 

Cox turned their second 
annual Falcon Invitational 
Wrestling Tournament from a 
six-team competition into a one- 
team exhibition. 

The two-time defending state 
champion Falcons placed U- 
men in the finals out of a 
possible 12. The Falcons won 
exactly half of the individual 
titles in an awesome display of 
overall team strength that 
totaUy dominated the field of 
Princess Anne, Great Bridge, 
Deep Creek, Warwicl( and 
Ferguson. 

The two-day affair featured 
five state champion wrestlers, 
all of whom won in their weight 
classes. Princess Anne's 98- 
pound state champ Ken Nowlin 
defeated Cox's Bob Battalio 5-0. 
Arthur Jones, Great Bridge's 
^ 138-pound state champ, 
decisioned Cox's Peter Drew 21- 
8. Cox's trio of state champs 
(Chris ConWwright, Mike 
Newborn and Jim Gaudreau) 
all won handily. Newbern was 
the most impressive of the 
group pinning Princess Anne's 
Jim Rogers at 1:44. 

ABOUT THE only honor that 
escaped Cox's grasp wasthat of 
the tournament's outstanding 
wrestler. The six coaches voted 
that award to Great Bridge's 
Greg Beasly ftrho won the 105- 
pound title with a pin of Deep 
Creek's Willie Taylor at 1:58. 



Princess Anne's Jim Ben- 
jumea joined teammate Nowlin 
in the winner's circle with an 8-4 
defeat of Cox's Rusty Yerkes in 
the 132-pound class. The 
Cavaliers made a respectable 
showing in the tournament with 
two firsts, three seconds, two 
thirds and three fourths. Carl 
Black (119-pound), Bill 
Dickerson (Impound) and Jim 
Rogers ( 145TppuildJ(r, were 
Princess Anne's runners-up. .^r 

Coin's Tim Davidson ^m tik 



112-pound title defeating Great 
Bridge's Ken Trotman. After a 
scoreless first period, Davidson 
scored three points in the 
second period and seven in the 
final period to coast to an easy 
10-0 triumph. 

FALCON GLEN Felthousen 
followed Davidson on the mats 
and was equally impressive. 
The defending tournajnent 
champion i»oia WH UQ^iind 
title with a 4-0 decial|(>i over 



Princess Anne's Carl Black. 

Perhaps the best match of the 
Saturday night finals, was tbe 
155-pound match-up of (Tox'i 
Dwight McGraw and Norman 
Goihetz of Deep Creek. Gomets 
moved to a 2-0 lead midway 
through the second period. 
McGraw finally tied matters at 
2-2 seconds before the end Of the 
match to send it into overtime. 
McGraw totally dominated his 
tiring opponent in the overtime 
periods outso6i:ing Gomeiz 5-0. 




/ 




Flip-flo^ at half time 



Vmember of the city recreation department 
gymnastics team demonstrateil flips and 
other assorted body contortions during 



halftimo at the Baysjde .f*^^ Indian River 
haskrlball ^ame Friday night. (iSun photo by 
find Boudion) 



Princess Anne beats Ghurchland 



COX'S RUSTY Yerlies (bottom) 
seems to be looliing to his coach for 
advice during his 132-pound match 
with Princess Anne's Jim 



Reniumea. The Cavalier Wrestler 
pressed his advantage and went on 
to win Ml. 

(Sun photo by Rod Mann) 




Princess Anne 57 
Ghurchland 51 

Princess Anne jumped to an 
early lead and coasted to a 57-51 
win over Ghurchland Saturday 
night at Princess Anne. 

Behind the torrid first half 
shooting of forward John 
Paden, the Cavaliers moved to 
a 19-4 lead early in the second 
quarter. Paden, who was the 
game's high scorer with" 25 
points, netted 18 points in the 
first two quarters. 

"We jumped on them real 
good at the start. Our press was 
working really well and we 
were getting a lot of easy 



baskets," said Princess Anne 
Coach Leo Anthony. 

Ghurchland came back to 
within 27-22 at the half m they 
outscored the Cavaliers 18-8 
over the final minutes of the 
second period. Reserve Jim 
Kampman led the Ghurchland 
comeback hitting for ten points 
in the second quarter. 

Princess. Anne maintained a 
seven-pojnt cushion for much of 
the second half. C^urchland did 
manage to pull within four 
points late in the fourth quarter, 
but (Jeorge Purdin iced the 
Cavaliers' win with a three- 
point play. 

Princess Anne's record is now 
5-1, but Anthony wasn't that 
impressed with the latest 




Cavalier effort, 
standing around 
hadn't played in 
the layoff was probably 
reason,'' satd Anthony: 
Ghurchland is now 3-3. 

Oscar Smith 80 
Kellam 74 

Kellam saw a one-point lead 
disappear in the face of a 28- 
poinl Oscar Smith fourth 
quarter, and the Knights 
dropped their fifth of the season 
80-74, Friday night. 

Smith's fourth quarter 
comeback was led by' the 
shooting of^Ricky SpellmSn and 
Mike Hill. Spellman was the 
game's high scorer with 22 
points while Hill added 15 



points. 

The Knights had battled back 
from a six-point first quarter 
deficit to close within two at 
talftime" 36-34. Kellam 
culminated iMit game-long 
uphill struggle by taking over 
the lead in the third quarter. 
Sophomore Brian Macon, who 
had a personal varsity-high of 
21 points, led the Knight 
resurgence. 

Kellam faded badly in the 
stretch and now has a 1-5 
record, the Knights, following a 
season long pattern, had a 
balanced scoring effort, Robert 
Hughes, Gary Woodhouse, and 
Jim Perkins all hit in double 
figures, but once again it was 
not enough. 



COX WRESTLERS were 
pvervwhcre during the Falcon 
Invitational Wrestling Tournament. 
The Falcons placed U -men in the 
finals out of a possible 12. Glen 
Felthonsen (face showing) has 
Princess .\nno wrestler Carl Black 



in an interesting hold. Felthousen 
wont on to win the match 4-0. Cox 
didn'l l(V>o many matches during the 
finals Saturday night. The Falcons 
grabbed six firjvt place finishes in 
their own tournament. (Sun photos 
hv Rod Mann) 





Doift face it alone. 



I3ctwcen the economy and Hk energy 
aisis, most people tould probably use st)mc 
cxtr.i financial help tlus year. And that's what 
we're conunitted to at Unite^ Virginia-. 

If you're worried abouf saving money, 
for example, we'll liclp you make sense out of 
all tin: different interest rates. 

If Hk car you're driving secnis to go 



from full to empty m two trips to the 
supermarket, we can help you finance one 
that won't single liandedly threaten Viriiinias 
entire fiiel supply. 

If you're concerned abtnit things like 
sending your kids to college or repairing tlu; 
insulation on your Ikhisc. we can help you 
solve tlK>se kind of problems, too. 



hi f^ct, at United Virginia you can talk to 
a financial expert about any financial problem 
you face ui 1974. 

So if stimetlung conies up, come in. 

Y4)u not only have all our wislk-s for a 
li.ippy ,iiul pi osperoiLs new year, you liave our 
promise tlut this isn't a sentiment we'll torget 
hv l.niuarv iSth. 



lMted^^]^;iiiial0 



Uniud VirfsmiJ Bank Seaboard NitKinal Monbcf FDIC 



mm 




Police chief 
devotes life 
to the public 



^ 



BffU4Ukisk 



"People is what we deal with, and they're 
beautiful. Each p^rspn is an individual and we treat 
everyone this way.^ TRat statement from Linwood 
R. Eaton, chief. Little Creek Naval Amphibious- 
Base Police Force, illustrates the personal concern 
men of the unit have for those they are charged with 
protecting. ,' ^ 

Chirf Eaton joined the base police force as a 
patrolman when it was formed in November 1947 
and rose through the ranks. He i^^,' "I was 21 years 
old when I came here, and I've grown up on the 
base." Reflecting over changes of the past quarter- 
century in the operation of the base police, which is 
concerned primarily with internal security of the 
facility, he says, "The public is more demanding 
today. And I think they should be." 

Chief Eaton lias also noticed a great change in the 
role of law enforcement officers over the years. He 
says, "Public demands have made police more 
professional in their work. Years ago the bigger a 
police officer was, the more people he locked up. 
Today a police officer must be more of a diplomat 
because of people's concern with their rights. 

"FOR KX.\MPLE,*' he said "if you send an 
officer into a domestic situation and he isn't well 
trained, he could trigger a bigger problem than he 
originally had. Many times, on the other hand, the 
officer could solve the problem by giving advice 
without making arrests." 

One of the more unusual crimes which Chief 
Eaton cites as being cleared by base police 
personnel was a three-month rash of thefts of 
women's wallets at the base commissary. He said 
the wallets were removed from purses left 
momentarily unattended in shopping carts as the 
women Iwowsed around the produce counters. The 
wallets would be recovered at various locations 
throughout the commissary where they had been 
discarded after the contents had been removed. 
ChiefEatonsaysthetheftsstoppedasabruptlyasthey 
began. He speculates that the person responsible 
may have been arrested for another crime and 
decided to halt the thefts out of fear of being 
apprehended. 

TTie respect which Chief Eaton has earned is 
illustrated in his election as second vice-president 
in the Tidewater Crime Clinic, comprised of 
members of the various civilian, military and 
federal police departments throughout Tidewater. 

Although the base police force is comprised 
entirely of civilians, they work closely with other 
military and civilian agencies, including the Shore 
Patrol, Naval InTelligence, the FBI and local and 
state police. 

They become involved with virtually all types of 
law enforcement ranging from traffic violations to 
murder, and become engaged in proceedings at all 
levels of military and civilian courts. 



READ 
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Tlie 

Sun 

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•M»S P*»iun anx u| p«||in H Ajmm3»n diuns ■eatsod ON 

IIVM A1<i3U. ss3Nisna 



"Cut ouvand tape or paste top half to front of envelope*** 

1000-79^T 

(No Dealers Please) -i f 
Gummed addressed labels-3 Lines on each-No LinHf lin sets. Please 
give zip and do not send stamps, Use separate paper and list sets. 
Please print, Allow 6 to 8 weeks for delivery. All labels sent to 
address on label. . 



Gentlemen: 

PLEASE SEND ME. 

ENCLOSED IS $ - 

NAME ,.... 

St. & No 

CITY 



SETS OF LABELS. 



The Sun-Wednesday. January 2, 1974-f^ 6 



Are You 
SURE You're 
Not Being 
Clieated? 

Do you know how to 
guwd agaimt rifwff*? 

What to do wiMn you 
find you have baan vk>- 
timiiad? 

Afv you letting tha ihort 
for your money? 




STATE . ZIP. 







WANTED 

Houses To Sell 

Anywhere in Va. Beach 

For quick results and mor« cash In your pocket . . . 
let us sell your^property. A competent staff of Profes- 
sional expert; on duty and always available. 

CALL 497-4851 

STOHL REALTY 

4920 Virginia Beach Bhfd. at Aragona Bhfd. 




The puppyijou wanted 




is up to 



PET 




tTh 1 1 /f) ^ff ^^ 497-1409XV^97^468 
T-^ ^^ '^ Next to Safeway on 

Pet Luv Puppy Sale independence Blvd. 

ALL 1 973 MODELS MUST GO! 




J 




m"mxi/lm 



seconds 

Isifl 

enom$h. 



Al a linne when peopk are demanding more 
Mlwnalive ai^eitising television cofrenetcials a»e 
qettmg ^KvMr 

The trend « to 30 second spote Or lime lof 
atxM ^_« iWds , 

Thai's not'enoogh to tell evefylhinq con-a/nwrs 
Nanlleknowttiesedays pnce«, coiofs guataoiecs. 
•h«e to tmd It whal i1 s made oi and so much 
more 

Mnsd a < ti B li s e whee ywj can ipD ■ co^^}^e^ 



story without bomg a last talker 

Innewspmers 

In newsoapers ycki c^n gtvp Ihe fuH details— m 
305*^ inabsort)250 
wpfd iiiy asfromTV 

Ana newspapers lei a cnneijmer pause lo 
evakiale, re-reed. Widawen clip your ad as a reminder 

MM^apes haw MHays been the hardest 
(•Brttng wfnerlisinQ tnedmm 
And «^ Ihir* thor luture loolis tietter than evw 



hkn bm ^tportunlty 

dous dollars. 

You'll gtttMt mithori- 
tatiMMpfromPMtr 
Wmm.thahithlyn- 
tptcttd au^rity^ean- 
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atGaonit Waging- 
UnNanity. 
To make your d(4ian go 
further, READ- 

JfOnd 

Your 

Money 

by Pft«r W«ov«r 

In 

The 
Sun 




UQttS 



J 



NOTICE 

Virginia:. 

The regular meeting of 
the Council of the City of 
Virginia Beach will be held 
in the Council Chambers of 
the Administration 
Building, City Hall, 
Princess Anne Station, 
Virginia Beach, Virginia, 
on Monday, January 14, 
1974, at 2:00 P.M. at which 
time the following 
applications will be heard: 
Change of Zoning District 
Classifications: 
VIRGINIA BEACH 
BOROUGH 

1. Petition of Broyles, 
McKenry,. Gorry and Dills 
for a CHANGE OF ZON- 
ING DISTRICT CLASSI- 
FICATION from A- 
1 Apartment District to B-4 
Resort Commercial 
District on certain property 
Beginning at a point 125 feet 
more or less West of Pacific 
Avenue, running a distance 
of 125 feet along the North 
side of 35th Street, running 
a distance of 150 feet along 
the East side of Sea Pines, 
running a distance of 125 
feet along the Northern 
property line and running a 
distance of 150 feet along 
the Eastern property line. 
Said parcel is Itnown as Lot 
J. Plat of Sea Pines and 
contains 18,750 square feet. 
Planning Commission 
recommends modification 
to A-2 Apartment District. 
VIRGINIA BEACH 
BOROUGH. 
LYNNHAVEN BOROUGH 

2. Petition of T,E. Hurley 
for a CHANGE OF ZON- 
ING DISTRICT CLASSI- 
FICATION from R- 
6 Residential District to A-4 
Apartment District on 
certain property located on 
the East side of Matt Lane 
and at the Eastern 
extremity of Garden Drive, 
running a distance of 137.40 
feet along the East side of 
Matt Lane, running a 
distance of 133.56 feet along 
the Northern proi>erty line, 
running a distance of 137.42 
feet along the Eastern 
property line and running a 
distanceof 135.60 feet along 
the Southern property line. 
Said parcel contains 18,500 
square feet more or less, 
and Is known as 
"Unnumbered Parcel, Plat 
"A" of Additional Lots, 
West Oceana Gardens." 
(West Oceana Gardens 
Area). LYNNHAVEN 
BOROUGH. 

3. Petition of Grayson M. 
Whifehurst, Jr. (Fralin & 
Waldron, Inc.) by Grover C. 
Wright, Jr., Attorney, for a 
CHANGE OF ZON- 
ING DISTRICT CLASSI- 
FICATION from R. 
4 Resii^ential District to 0-1 
Office District on certain 
property beginning at a 
point 1300 feet more or less 
North of Will-0 Wisp Drive, 
and 400 feet Edst of First 
Colonial Road, running a 
distance of 422.72 feet along 
the Northern property line, 
running a distance of 400 
feet along the Eastern 
property line and running a 
distance of 522.72 feet along 
the Southern property line 
and running a distance of 
400 feet,along the Western 
property line. Said parcel 
contains 4. 8 acres. (General 
Hospital Of Virginia Beach 
Area). LYNNHAVEN 
BOROUGH. 

4. Petition of Colonial 
Investors, a Partnership by 
Thomas C Broyles, 
Attorney, for a CHANGE 
OF ZCNING DISTRICT 
CLASSlFICAtlON from R 
4 Residential District to 1 
Office District on certain 
property located at the 
Southeast corner of Will-0 
Wisp Drive and First 
Colonijl Rgad, xMPfl'fft • 



distance of 489.63 feet along 
the East side of First 
Colonial Road, running a 
distance of 591.32 feet along 
the South side of Will O 
Wisp Drive, running a 
distanceof 541.71 feet along 
the Eastfrn property line 
and ruiMiifig a distance of 
573.47 fett along Ifie Nwth 
side of WUdwood Drive. 



Said parcel contains *.7( 
acres. (General Hoipital of 
Virginia Beach area). 
LYNNHAVEN BOROUGH. 

5. Petition of Hado 
Development Corp. (Harold 
W. James, Jr.) by by James 
A. Evans, Attorney, for a 
CHANGE OF ZON 
ING DISTRICT CLASSI 
FICATION frijm A. 
1 Apartment District to B-2 
Community Business 
District on certain property 
beginning at a point 404 feet 
more or less East of Gary 
Street ind 150 feet North of 
Virginia Beach Boulevard, 
running a distance of 279 
feet along the Southern 
property line, rurthing a 
distance of 1450 feet more 
or less alopg the South side 
of Old Virginia Beach Road, 
and running a distance of 
1399 feet along the Eastern 
property line. Said parcel is 
known as part of Lots 36 and 
27, Plat of Oceana Gardens, 
excluding a parcel 205 feet 
by 105 feet of Lot 36, and 
contains 9 acres more or 
less. Plats with more 
detailed information are 

'available: in . the 
Department of Planning. 
(Oceana Area). 
LYNNHAVEN BOROUGH. 
Conditional Use Permits; 

6. Application of Hado 
Development Corp. (Harold 
W. James, Jr.) by James A. 
Evans, Attorney, for a 
CONDITIONAL 4ISE 

' PtRMIT for J|>urK Storage 
yard (mini^warehouses) on 
certain property beginning 
at a point 404 feet more or 
less B^ast of Gary Street, 
running a distance of 279 
feet (nore or less along the 
North side of Virginia 
Beach Boulevard, running 
a distance of 1600 feet more 
or less along the Western 
property line, running a 
distance of 310 feet more or 
less along the South side of 
Old Virginia Beach Road, 
running a distance of 1549 
feet along the Eastern' 
property line. Said parcel is 
known as Lot 27 and part of 
Lot 36,, Plat of Oceana 
Gardens, excluding a 
parcel 205 feet by 105 feet of 
Lot J4. the 4otal -parcet 
contains 10 acres more or 
less. Plats with more 
detailed Ifrrormatlon are 
available in the 

Department of Planning. 
(Oceana Area). 
LYNNHAVEN BOROUGH. 
PUNGO BOROUGH 

7. Application Of Sidney 
Beale for a CONDITIONAL 
USE PERMIT to operate a 
kennel on certain property 
beginning at a point 3600 
feet more or less South of 
South Stowe Road, running 
a distance of 210 feet along 
the West side of Princess 
Anne Road; running a 
distance of 420 feet along 
the Southern property line, 
running a distance of 210 
feet along the Western 
property line and running a 
distance of 420 feet along 
the Northern property line. 
Said parcel contains 2 acres 
more or iess^ PUNGO 
BOROUGH. 

Richard J. Webbon 
City Clerk 

l-2,9.2t| 

VIRGINIA: IN THE 
CLERK'S OFFICE OF 
THE CIRCUIT COURT OF 
THE CITY OF VIRGINIA 
BEACH, ON THE 26TH 
DAY OF DECEMBER, 1973 

In Chancery 

No. 16476- B 

In re: Adoption of Lorl 

Lynn Collins 

By: Hal Max Kanoy and 

Jean Audrey Kanoy, 

Petitioners 

To: Philip M. Collins 

234 Bonn's Road 

Newport News, Virginia 

ORDER 

This day came Hal Max 
Kanoy and Jean Audrey 
Kanoy, Petitioners, and 
represented that the obiect 
of this proceeding is to 
effect the adoption of the 
above named infant(s), 
Lori Lynn Collins by Hal 
Max Kanoy and Jean 
Audrey Kanoy, husband 
and wife, and affidavit 
having been made and filed 
that Philip M. Collins, a 
natural parent of said 
child, the last known post 
office address being: 234 
Benn's Road, Newport 
News, Virginia. 

It Is therefore Ordered 
that the said Philip M. 
Collins appear before this 
Court within ten (10) days 
after publication of this 
Order and indicate his-her 
attitude toward the 
proposed adoption, or 
otherwise do what is 
necessary to protect his 
interest in this matter. 

John V. Fentress, Clerk 
By: Sandra Hargorve D.C. 

William C. Bunch, Jr. 

Bunch and Swanner 

Attorneys At Law 

4565 Virginia Beach 

Boulevard 

Virginia Beach, .Virginia, 

23462 

1 2,9,16,24-4t 

Commonwealth of Virginia, 
In the Clerk's Office of 
the Circuit Court of the City 
ofVlrginia Beach, on the 
26tti day of December, 1973. 
Karitd M. Quigley, 
Plaintiff, 
against 

Elizabeth C. Quigley, 
Defendant. 

ORDER OF 
PUBLICAXION 

The object of this suit Is 
for the said plaintiff to 
obtain a divorce a mensa et 
thoro on tRe grounds of 
desertion to be later 
merged into a divorce a 
vinculo matrimonii from 
the said defendant, upon the 
grounds of desertion. 

And an affidavit having 
been made and filecf that 
the defendant is not a 
resident of the State of 
Virginia, the last known 
post office address being: 
28 Gtoissett Harbor Road, 
Falmouthi Massachusetts. 

It is ordered that she do 
appear here within 10 (ten) 
days after due publication 
hereof, and do what may be 
necessary to protect her 
inter esT in this sijif . 

JOHN V. FENTRESS. 

CLERK 

Phyllis N. Styron, Deputy 

Clerk. 

Mr. Osie H. Gay, Jr , Atty. 
2171 River Road. 
Virginia Beach, Virginia 
1 2,9,14,23 4t 



ii 



f 



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wmm^mmmjmmm 



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Commonwealth of Virginia, 
In the Clerk's office of the 
Circuit Court of the City of 
Virginia Beach, on the 26th 
day of Decemt>er, 1973. 
John David Lindly, 
PIflntlff, 
m^inst 

Debora B. Lindly, 
Defendant. , 

ORDER OF 
PUBLICATION 

The obi«t of. this suit Is 
for the said plal'ntiff to 
obtain a divorce A AAensa 
et Thoro to be later merged 
into a Divorce A Vinculo 
Matrimonii from the said 
defendant, upon the 
grounds of desertion. 

And an affidavit having 
been made and filed that 
the defendant is not a 
resident of the State of 
Virginia, the last known 
post office address being:. 
3926 N. Keeler Avenue, 
Chicago, llUnoJs. 

It is ordered thAt she do 
appear hgre withjn 10 (ten) 
days after due publication 
hereof, and do what may be 
necessary to protect her 
interest in this suit. 

JOHN V. I^ENTRESS, 

CLERK 

Phyllis N. Styron, Deputy 

Clerk 

Mr. George F. Darden, Jr., 
Atty. 

305 30th Street, 
Virginia Beach, Virginia 
1-2,9,1^,23-41 



> « 



% 



. NOTICE OF 
PUBLIC HEARINQ 

The Virginia Beach 
Planning Con^mlssion will 
hold a Public Hearing on 
Tuesday, January 8, 1974, at 
1:00 P. M. in the Council 
Chambers of the 

Adrhlnistration Building, 
Princess Anne Courthouse, 
Virginia Beach, Virginia. 
The following applications 
will appear on the agenda: 

SUBDIVISION VARIANCE: 

Request of Robert L. 
Walker for a variance of 
certain design standards set 
forth in Section 4, Subdivision 
Regulations, City of Virginia 
Biach, June, 1970, on certain 
property located at Kline 
Drive and Watersedge Drive. 
(Little Neck Area). LYNN- 
HAVEN BOROUGH. 
DEFERRED FOR 
APERIOD OF to DAYS BY 
PLANNING COMMISSION 
ON NOVEMBER 13, 1973: 

1. Petition of Robert D. 
Ruffin, Jr., for a CHANGE 
OF ZONING DISTRICT 
CLASSIFICATION from R-8 
Residential District to B-2 
Community Business 
District on certain property 
beginning at a point 1000 feet 
more or less Northeast of 
Shell Road and running a 
distance of 732.22 feet along 
the South side of Nor- 
thampton Boulevard, run- 
.ling a distance of 875.90 feet 
ainw the Eastern property 
llfli Snd running a distance of 
424 feet along the North side 
of Sh^li Road and running a 
distnace of 453.10 feet^long 
the Western property line. 
Said parcel contains 6.71 
acres. (Sajo Farms Area). 
BAYSIDE BOROUGH. 

REGULAR AGENDA: 
CHANGE OF ZOINING 
DISTRICT CLASSIFICA- 
TIONS: ^ 

2. Petition Of Thalia 
Wayside Corporation for a 
CHANGE OF ZONING 
DISTRICT CLASSIFICA- 
TION from R-6 Residential 
District to A-1 Apartment 
District on certain property 
beginning at a point 475.79 
feet East of Thalia Road and 
499.85 feet North Of Virginia; 
Beach Boulevard,' running a' 
distance of 2380.67 feet along 
the Southern property line, 
running a distance of 852.5^ 
feet along the Western 
property line, running 4 
distance of 1831.87 feet along 
the Northern property line 
and running a distance of 
1138.93 feetalong the Eastern 
property line. Said parcel 
contains 40 acres more or 
less. (Thalia Area). KEMPS- 
VJLLE BOROUGH. 

3. Petition of Laura M. 
Harness and Jessie O. 
Harness for a CHANGE OF 
ZONIN'G DISTRICT 
CLASSIFICATION from R-8 
Residential District to 0-1 
Office District on certain 
property located at the 
Northwest' cocner of South 
Lynnhaven Road and Ansol 
Lane, running a distance of 
150 feet along the North side 
of Ansol Lane, running a 
distance of 145.43 feet along 
the West side of South Lynn- 
haven Road, running a 
distance of 160.83 feet along 
the Southern prope^-ty line 
and running a distance of 
203.46 feet along the Western 
property line. Said parcel 
contains 0.6 acre. (Lynn- 
haven Village Area). LYNN- 
HAVEN BOROUGH. 

4. Petition of Gee's 
"Welding Corporation by 

Frank Butler, III, Attorney, 
for a CHANGE OF ZONING 
DISTRICT CLASSIFICA- 
TION from 0-1 Office 
District to 1-2 Heavy 
Industrial District on certain 
property beginning at a point 
303 feet nriore or less West of 
Bendix Road and 200 feet 
South of Bonney Koaa, 
running a distance of 600.56 
feet along the Eastern 
property line, running a 
distance of 1(».75 feet along 
the Southern property line 
(Virginia Beach-Norfolk 
Expressway) and running a 
distance of 604.64 feet along 
the Western property line 
and running a distance of 108 
feet more or less along tt>e 
Northern property line. Said 
parcel contains 1.5 acres 
more or less. KEMPSV1LLE 
B^OUGH. 

5. Petition of Frank E. 
Butler, III and W. Leigh 
Ansell for a CHANGE OF 
ZONING DISTRICT 
CLASSIFICATION from O 1 
Office District to 1-1 Light 
industrial District on certain 
property beginning at a point 
638 20 feet East of GraysOfT 
Road, running a distance of 
150 36 feet along the North 
side of Morris Avenue, 
running a distance of 172,53 
feet along the West side of the 
Virginia Beach Norfolk 
Expressway (Route No. 44), 
running a distance of ».» 
leet atong the Northern 
property Iftie and running • 



distance of 171.43 foot along 
the Western property line. 
KEMPSVILLE BOROUGH. 

6. Petition of (Salress W. 
Downs and Genevlelle G. 
Downs by Prank E. Butler, 
III, Attorney, for a CHANGE 
OF/ ZONING DISTRICT 
CLASSIFICATION from 0-1 
Cmice District to 1-2 Heavy 
Industrial District beginning 
at a point 411.52 feet West of 
Beitdlx Rowl and 200 feet 
South of Bonney Road, 
running a distance of 604.64 
feet along the Eastern 
property line, running 
•distance of 166.25 feet along 
the Southern property line 
(Virginia Beach-Norfolk 
Expressway) running a 
distance of 582.25 feet along 
the Western property Ijne 
and running a distance of 170 
feet more or less along the 
Northern property line. Said 
parcel contains 2.22 acres 
more or less. KEMPSVILLE 
BOROUGH. 

7. Petition of Aldine J. 
Coffman, Jr. and Penelope 
D. Coffman for a CHANGE 
OF ZONING DISTRICT 
CLASSIFICATION from B-2 
Community Business 
District to 1-1 Light 
Industrial District on certain 
property beginning at a point 
355 feet more or less Nor- 
theast of Hook Lane, running 
a distance of 713.69 feet along 
the East side of Northampton 
Boulevard, running a 
distance of 461.35 feet along 
tj[\e Eastern property line and 
running a distance of 349.3 
feet along the Southern 
property line. Said parcel Is 
triangular in shape and 
contains 1.22 acres. (Bayville 
Gardens Area). BAYSIDE 
BOROUGH. 

«. Petition of Cobo 
Corporation, a Virginia 
Corporation for a CHANGE 
OF ZONING DISTRICT 
CLASSIFICATION from B 4 
Resort Commercial District 
to H-2 Resort Hotel District 
on certain property begin- 
ning at a point 123.72 feet 
East of Kleen Street and 
running a distance of 200.27 
feet along the North side of 
Shore Drive, running 
a distance of 972 feet along 
the Eastern property line, 
running a distance of 235 feet 
along the Northern property 
line of which 200 feet more or 
less Is the mean low water 
line of Chesapeake Bay, 
running a distance of 972.21 
feet along the Western 
property line. Said parcel 
contains 4.5 acres more or 
less. Plats with more 
detailed information are 
available in the department 
of Planning. (Lynnhaven 



distance of 27M.n ftet along 

the Northern property line 

(Chesapeake Bay - Mean 

Low Water Line), running a CHANGE 

distance of 458 feet along the DISTRICT 



BAYSIDE BOROUGH. 

21. Petition of Wedgeweod 

Building Corp., for a 

OF ZONING 

CLASSIFICA 



Easfern property line. Said TION from B-a Community 

Business District to H-1 Hotel 
District on certain property 
Iqicated on the South side of 
Northampton Boulevard and 
the East side o( Norwich 
Avenue, beginning at a point 
175 feet East of Norwich 



parcel contains 31.940 acres 
(Lynnhaven Beach Areal. 
LYNNHAVEN BOROUGH. 
14. Petition of Com- 
monwealth Financial Corp., 
by Owen B. Pickett, Attor- 
ney, for a CHANGE OF 



ZONING DISTRICT Avenue, running a distance 
CLASSIFICATION from R-8 Of IM.SI feet along the South 
Residential District h) A-1 »1«»« of Northampton 
Apartment District on Boulevard, running a distance 
certain property beginning at of 294 feet along the Eastern 
a point 440 feet more or less property line, running a 
South of South BIrdneck distance of 433 feet along the 
Road, running a distance of Southern property line and 
1664 feet more or less along running a distance of 299.68 
the West side of Generaf f«et along the Western 
Booth Boulevard, running a property line of which 94 feet 
distance of 325 feet more or is the East side of Norwich 
less along the Southern Avenue. Said parcel contains; 
property line, running a l.'i acres more or less. 



distance of 1365.34 feet along 
the Western property line 
and running a distance of 
159.31 feet along the Northern 
property line. Said parcel 



Lake Estates 
BAYSIDE 



(Diamond 
Area). 
BOROUGH. 

s22. Petition of Overnlte 
nns. Inc., for a CHANGE OF 



contains 8.5 acres more or ZONING DISTRICT 



less. PRINCESS ANNE 
BOROUGH. 

15. Petition of Com- 
monwealth Financial Corp., 
by Owen B. Pickett, Attor- 
ney, for a CHANGE OF 
ZONING DISTRICT 



CLASSIFICATION from B-2 
Community Business 
District to H-1 Hotel District 
on certain property begin- 
ning at a point 371.38 feet 
East of Norwich Avenue, 
running a distance of 175 feet 



CLASSIFICATION from/R-« a'o"9 the South side of 



Residential District to 
Apartment District 



A-1 
on 



Northampton Boulevard, 
running a distance of 294 feet 



certain property beginning at «'ong the Eastern property 



a polht 470 feet more or less 
South of South BIrdneck 



line, unnlng a distance of 175 
feet along the Southern 



Road, running a distance of property line and running a 



2100 feet along the Western 
property line of which 1642 
feet is the East side of 
General Booth Boulevard, 
running a distance of 860.78 



distance of 294 feet along the 
Western property line. Said 
parcel contains 1.18 acres 
more or less. (Diamond 
Lakes Estates Area). 



feet along the Southern -BAYSIIDE BOROUGH 

property line, running a 

distance of 2492.11 feet along 

the Eastern property line and 

running a distance of 1234.23 CHANGE 

feel along the Northern DISTRICT 

property line of which 200 

feet Is the South side of South 

Birdneck Road. Said parcel 

contains 41.2 acres and ex- 



23. Petition by Resolution 
of the Honorable Council, 
City of Virginia Beach, for a 
OF ZONING 
CLASSIFICA- 
TION from B-2 Community 
Business District to A-1 
Apartment District on 
certain property beginning at 



eludes a parcel containing 2.3 ? P"'"' 13^ feet more or less 



acres proposed for B-1 
Commercial Residential 
Zoning. PRINCESS ANNE 
BOROUGH. 
16. Petition of Com 



South of PInewood Drive, 
running a distance of 360 feet 
more or less along the West 
side of North Lynnhaven 
Road, running a distance of 



monwealth Financial Corp., 250 feet along the Southern 



Beach Area) 
BOROUGH. 

9. Petition 
Coffman, Jr. 
D. Coffman for 
OF ZONING 



LYNNHAVEN 



Of Aldine J. 

and Penelope 
a CHANGE 
DISTRICT 



CLASSIFICATION from R-6 
Residential District to 1-1 
Light Industrial District on 
certain property located at 
the Southeast intersection of 
Hook Lane Extended and 
Northampton Boulevard, 
running a distance of 11(i.43 
feet along the East side of 
Hook Lane and Hook Line 
Extended, running a distance 
of 467.65 feet along the 
Northern property line of 
which 150.15 feet is the So(uth 
side of Nptthampton 
Boulevard, running a 
distance of 486.96 feet along 
the Southern property line 
and running a distance of 
116.54 feet along the Eastern 
property line. Said parcel 
contains 1.21 acres. (Beach- 
wood-Bayville Gardens 
Area). BAYSIDE 
BOROUGH. 

10. Petition of Fala Cor- 
poration, a Virginia./ Cor- 

f oration, by Frank E. Butler, 
II, Attorney, for a CHAnge 
Of zoning district 

CLASSIFICATION frOm B-4 
Resort Commercial Bi^siness 
District to B»2 Community 
Business District on certain 
property located at the 
Southwest corner of ^hore 
Drive and Vista Circle, 
running a distance Of 443.7 
feet along the South side of 
Shore Drive, running a 
distance of 65.53 feet along 
the West side of Vista Circle 
and running a distance of 
447.19 feet along the Southern 
property line, and running a 
distance of 1.85 feet along the 
Western property line. Said 
parcel is triangular In shape. 
(Lesner Bridge Area). 
LYNNHAVEN BOROUGH. 

11. Petition of Fala Cor- 
poratldn, fa Virginia Cor- 
poration, by Frank E. Butler, 
III, Attorney, for a CHANGE 
OF ZONING DISTRICT 
CLASSIFICATION fronri B-4 
Resort Commercial Business 
District to fli2 Community 
Business District on certain 
property located on the 
Southeast corner of Shore 
Drive and Vista Circle, 
running a djstance 0fYl29.17 
feet along the South side of 
Shore Drive, running a 
distance of 76.3() feet along 
the East side of Vista Circle, 
running a distanc e of 129.17 
feet along the South side of 
Shore Drive, running a 
distance of 76.30 feet along 
the East side of Vista Circle, 
running a distance of 139.77 
feet along the Southern 
property line and running a 
distance of 99.43 feet along 
the Eastern property line. 
Said parcel contains 0.27 
acres more or less. (Lesner 
Bridge Area). LYNNHAVEN 
BOROUGH. 

12. Petition of Fala Cor- 
poration, a Virginia Cor- 
poration, for a CHANGE OF 
ZONING DISTRICT 
CLASSIFICATION from 0-1 
Office District to 1-1 Light 
Industrial District on certain 
property beginning at a point 
550 feet more or less East of 
Grayson Road, running a 
distance of 99.12 feet along 
the North side of Katie 
Brown Drive, running a 
distance c. 90.96 feet along 
the West side of the Virginia 
Beach-Nortolk Expressway 
(Route No. 44), running a 
distance of 41.21 feet along 
the Northern property line 
and running a distance of 
102.75 feet along the Western 
property line. KEMPS- 
VILLE BOROUGH, 

13. Petition Of Lake 
George Corporation, a 
Virginia Corporation, for a 
CHANGE OF . ZONING 
DISTRICT CLASSIFICA- 
TION from B-4 Resort 
Commercial District to H-2 
Resort Hotel District on 
certain property North of 
Shore Drive beginning at the 
Northern extremity of North 
Great Ne€k Road and run 
ning a distance of 2715 feet 
along he Southern property 
line (North of Blocks A, B, C, 
O. E, F, G * H, Lynnlwven 
Beach), running a distance of 
472 feet along the Western 
property line, running a 



by; Owen B. Pickett, Attor 
ney, for a CHANGE OF 
ZONING DISTRICT 
CLASSIFICATION from R-8 
Residential District to B-1 
Commercial Residential 
District on certain property 
beginning at a point 1460 feet 
more or less South of South 
Birdneck Road and 115 feet 
more or less East of General 
Booth Boulevard, running a 
distance of 175 feet more or 
less along the Western 
property line, running a 
distance of 444 feet more or CHANGE 
less along the Northern DISTRICT 
piroperty line and running a 
distance of 344 feet more or 
less along the Eastern 
property line and running a 
distance of 342 feet more or 
less along the Southern 
property line. Said parcel 
contains 2.3 acres merit or 
less. PRINCESS ANNE 
BOROUGH. 

17. Petition of Mrs. E.S- 
Garcia for a CHANGE OF 
ZONING DISTRICT 
CLASSIFICATION from R-1 
Residential 

Reside1fiti_. .„. 

certain property beginning at tpore or less along 
a point on the South side of western Property line 
Colony Acres 1490 feet South- 
west of the Intersection of 
Colony Drive and London 
Bridge Road, running a 



property line (Norfolk and 
Southern Railway Right of 
Way), running a distance of 
220 feet more or less along 
the Western property line 
and running a distance of 200 
feet more or less along the 
Northern property line. Said 
parcel contains 1.35 acres 
more or less. (Pinewood 
Gardens Area). LYNN- 
HAVEN BOROUGH. 
24. Petition by Resolution 
of the Honorable Council, 
City of Virginia Beach, for a 
OF ZONING 
CLASSIFICA- 
TION from 1-1 Light 
Industrial District to A-1 
Apartment District on 
certain property located at 
the Northwest corner of 
Eureka Avenue and Southern 
Boulevard, running a 
distance of 555 feet more or 
less along the Eastern 
property line of which 230 
feet more or less is the West 
Side of Eureka Avenue,- 
running a distance of 530 feet 
nrtoreor less along the North 



al District to RA^^*M S%thern Boulevard, 
iai District .on running a distanceof 140 feet 



the 
and 
running a distance of 460 feet 
more or less along the 
Northern property line. Said 
parcel contains 4 acres more 



distance bf 1841 feet more or P^'ess-C Eureka Park Area). 



less along the Eastern 
property line, running a 



LYNNHAVEN BOROUGH 
25. Petition by Resoulutlon 



distance of 1830 feet mor6 or of the Honorable Council, 



less along the Southern 
property line, running a 



City of Virginia Beach, for a 
CHANGE OF ZONING 



distance of 1450 feet'more or DISTRICT CLASSIFICA- 
less along the Western TlONMrom R-6 Residential 
property line and running a D strict to A-1 Apartment 
distance of 1570 feet more or District on certain property 
less along the Northern beginning at a point 230 feet 



property line. Said parcel 
contains 69.5 acres and ex- 
cludes a parcel of land 
beginning at a point 2250 feet 



more or less [<lorth of 
Southern Boulevard, running 
a distance of 230 feet more or 
lets along the West side of 



Southwest of the intersection Eureka Avenue, running a 

of London Bridge Road and distance of 285 feet more or 

Colony Drive containing 'ess along the Southern 

43,654 square feet. Plats with property line, running a 

more detailed information distance of 325 feet more or 



Proposed Holl4nd Road 
Bypass, running a distance of 
550 feat along Hie Eastern 
boundary of indeptndance 
Boulevard Extended and 
running a distance of 7<0 fMt 
along ttie Northern boundary 
of Proposed Holland Road 
Bypass. Said parcel is 
triangular In shape and 
contains 4 cares more or less. 
(Timberlake Area). 
KEMPSVILLE BOROUGH. 

Conditianal Use Permits: 

CONDITIONAL USt 
PtRMITS: 

29. Application of Krauss 
Construction Company, Inc., 
far a CONDITIONAL USE 
PERMIT for a contractor's 
yard with open storage on 
certain property located on 
the South side of Holland 
Road extending 1035 feet 
between independence 
Boulevard , Extended and 
Proposed ^Holland Road 
Bypass, runit<ng a distance of 
550 feet along the Eastern 
boundary of Independence 
Boulevard Extended and 
running a distance of 760 feet 
along the Northern boundary 
of Propsed Holland Road 
Bypass. Said parcel Is 
triangular In shape and 
contains 4 acres more or less. 
(Timberlake Area). 
KEMPSVILLE BOROUGH. 

30. Application of Housing 
Systems, Inc., for a CON- 
DITIONA USE PERMIT to 
erect a 4-foot by 8-foot 
Signboard on certain 
property located at the 
Northwest corner of Lee 
Highlands Boulevard and 
South Lynnhavefi Road. Said 
parcel is currently zoned B-2 
Community Business 
District. (Princess Anne 
Plaza Are). LYNNHAVEN 
BOROUGH. 
STREET CLOSURES: 

31. Application of H.G. 
Felton, Helen B. Felton, Ruth 
S. Adkisson and Ellis 
Woodburn by Michael A. 
Inman, Attorney, for the 
discontinuance, closure and 
aibandonment of an unnamed 
30-foot street extending In a 
southeaterly direction from 
the South sideof Sell Road, 
West of Maharls Road as 
shown on plat entitled "Plan 
of Property located at 
Bayslde In Princess Anne 
County, Virginia" by W.B. 
Gallup dated August 8, 1951 
recorded in May Book 32, 
Page 68. (Lakevlew Park 
Area). BAYSIDE 
BOROUGH. 

32. Application of Herbert 
D. Smith by William R. 
Whab, Attorney, for the 
discontinuance, closure and 
abandonment of a portion of 
Southern Boulevard (for- 
merly Ocean Road) begin- 
ning at a point 477.30 feet 
West of Great Neck Road and 
running in a Westerly 
direction a distance of 406,89 
feet along the Northern 
boundary of Lots 38, 39, and 
40. Said street Is 40 feet in 
width and Is shown In Map 
Book 7, Page 62, "London 
Bridge, Plan of Lots" dated 
January, 1925. (London 
Bridge Area). LYNNHAVEN 
BOROUGH. 

33. Application of E.W. 
Keegan by Ansell, Butler and 
Canada for the discon- 
tinuance, closure and 
abandonment of Cherry 
Court beginning at a point 210 
feet hiore or less North of 
North Woodhouse Road and 
running in a Westerly 
direction from the western 
boundary of Cherry Lane a 
distance of 500 feet more or 
less. Said street is 50 feet In 
width, as shown in Map Book 
72, Page 49. (Alanton Area). 
LYNNHAVEN BOROUGH. 

Plats with more detailed 
Information on the above 
applications are available In 
the Office of the Department 
of Planning. 

All Interested persons are 
invited to attend. * 

Charles C. Carrington 
Director of Planning 

12-28, 1-2, 2T 



are available 
Department of 
(Colony Acres 
PRINCESS 
BOROUGH. 
18. Petition of Mrs. 
Garcia for a CHANGE 
ZONING DISTR 



in the I'ss along the Western 
Planning, property line and running a 
distance of 390 feet more or 
less along the Northern 
property line. Said parcel 
E.S. contains 2.15 acres more or 
less. (Eureka Park Area). 



Area). 
ANNE 



OF 

CT LYNNHAVEN BOROUGH. 
26. Petition by Resolution 
of the Honorable Council, 
City of Virginia Beach, for a 
OF ZONING 
CLASSIFICA 



CLASSIFICATION from R-3 
Residential District to R-6 
Residential District on 
certain property beginning at CHANGE 
a point 1 490 feet Southwest of DISTRICT 
the intersection of Colony TION from B-2 Community 
Drive and London Bridge Business District to A-1 
Road and 244 feet North of Apartment District on 
Cony Drive, running a certain property located at 
distance of 1475 feet more or the Southwest corner of 
less along the Eastern Virginia Beach Boulevard 
property line, running a and Eureka Avenue, running 
distance of 1742 feet nr»ore a distance of 180 feet more or 
or less albng the Western less along the South side of 
property line, and running a Virginia Beach Boulevard, 
distance of 1570 feet more or running a distance of 180 feet 
less along the Southern more or less along the West 
property line. Said parcel side of Eureka Avenue, 
contains 29.7 acres. (Colony running a distance of 390 feet 
Acres Area). PRINCESS more or less along the 
ANNE BOROUGH. Southern property line and 

19. Petition of Mrs. E.S. running a distance of 250 feet 
Garcia for a CHANGE OF moreor less a long the Western 
ZONING DISTRICT property line. Said parcel 
CLASSIFICATION from R-3 contains 1.41 acres more or 
Residential District to A-1 less. (Eureka Park Area). 
Apartment District on LYNNHAVEN BOROUGH, 
certain property beginning at 27. Petition of John J. 
a point 1280 feet moreor less Woodard, May__T. Woodard, 
North of Colony Drive, Samuel ■ >" - 
running a distance of 215 feet w" V*' 
more or less along the Wst |'«'"* 
side of London Bridge Road, J**"'' 
running a distance of 2660 Theima 

feet more or less along the """Sfl'^^^^'^Xc rnmir 
Northern property line, !., CHANGE OF ZONING 
running a distance of 605 feet D'STR CT CLASSIFICA- 
along the Western property T'ON 'rom 



I. White, Harriet 
James McGeein, 
McGeein, Mlscha 
Bevalan Ratal, 
J. Kayer, Philip 



B1 Business 
Dlsh-ict to A 1 
V7ro7eermoreVrl«s' along Apartment District on 
the southern property line, certamproperty beginning at 



line and running a distance of Residential 



Said parcel contains 34 acres 
Plats with more detailed 



a point 350 feet more or less 
North of Independence 



NOTICE 



information are available in Boulevard, running a 



the Department of Planning 
(Colony Acres Area). 
PRINCESS ANNE 
BOROUGH 



distance of 370.28 feet along 
tt»e Western property line of 
which 281.08 feet is the East 
side of Pleasure House Road, 



20. Petition of Diamond running a distance of 945.4 



feet along the Northern 

OF ZONING property line, running a 

CLASSIFICA- distance of 770.81 feet along 



Light the Eastern property line and 
o A-3 running a distance of 846.4 



ttie Southern 



Springs Corporation of r 

CHANGE 

DISTRICT 

TION 'from II 

Industrial District to . 

Apartment District on »eet along 

certain property locate* on property line. Satd porce^ 

the West side of Diamond contains 10.7 acres more W 

Springs Road, beginning at a less. (Robbins Comer Area). 

pbmt 817.04 feet South of the BAYSIDE BOROUGH, 

van Wyck Canal and across 28. Petition by ResolutMKi 

from Aragon Boulevard, of the Hon«w-ab le Cwincll, 

running a distance of 428 feet Ctty of Virginia toach, for • 

along me Eastern property CHANGE OF ZONING 

tine of which 278 feet is the DISTRICT CLASSIFICA 

West side of Diamond TION from Planning 



Springs Road, running a 
distahce of 669.66 feet along 
the Southern property line, 
running a distance of 580 feet 
more or less along the 
Western property line. Said 
parcel contalm 5.23 acres. 
(Diamofid Springs Area). 



Development Housing 

District (PO H) to t-J 
Community Business 
District on certain propmtV 
located on the South sida ef 
Holland Road extending 1409 
feet between tndapef^onc* 
Boulevard Extended and 



Virginia: 

The regular meeting of 
the Council ^of the City of 
Virginia Beach will be held 
in the Council Chambers of 
the Administration 
Building, City Hall, 
Princess Anne Station, 
Virginia Beach, Virginia, 
on Monday, Januar^7, 1974, 
at 2:00 P.M. at which time 
the following applications 
will be heard: 
Change of Zoning Disfrlcl 
Classifications: 
DEFERRED UNTIL 
JANUARY 7, 1974 BY CITY 
COUNCIL ON 

NOVEMBER 19, 1973 AND 
REFERRED BACK TO 
PLANNING 
COMMISSION: 

KEMPSVILLE BOROUGH 
1. Petition of Jonathan R. 
Sanderlin for a change of 
zoning district 
classification from R-6 
Residential District to B-2 
Community Business 
District on certain property 
located at the southwest 
corner of Kempsville Road 
and Providence Road. 
Running a distance of 1190 
leet more or less along the 
west side of Kempsville 
Road; from there running a 
distance of 432 feet more or 
less in a northwesterly 
direction from Kempsville 
Road; from there running a 
distance of 290 feet more or 
less in a westerly direction; 
from there running a 
distance of 2W feet more or 
lesk in a northwesterly 
direction; from there 
running a distance of 1080 
feet more or less in a 
northeasterly direction to 
Nfc south side of Providence 
Road; from there running a 
distance of 860 feet more or 
1^ in a southeasterly 
d^W^ten along the sooth 
side ^Providence Road. 
Said olKel contains 25 
acres MtgM or less. 

BOROUOM ^^^ 

J Petition of Jon«lii»fnil^ 
Sanderlin for a change ef < 
zoning district 
classification from ■♦ 
mstden fla l PHlrUH » • i 
Residence Busl^^ •« 
certain o<ai»art» 
iit feet mare m Iwa 
ff^^ umBiwoef csnw 
KempswlH* »••* 
Pie»M s wc » mmt n 

,<M»tfiwe»»»*«» *T,1T 
frein Pre * Ky» •••• 
from ffcer^^i^^^ _ 
were » •• " • 




northwesterly direction ; 
from there running along a 
curve to the right of length 
approximately 400 feet and 
of radius 400 feet more or 
less; from there running 460 
feet more or less In a 
northeasterly direction to 
the south side of Providence 
Road; from there running 
620 feet more or less In a 
southeasterly direction 
along the south side of 
Providence Road. Said 
parcel contains 10 acres 
moreorless. 
KEMPSVILLE 
BOROUGH. 

3. Petition of Jonathan R. 
Sanderlin for a change of 
zoning district 
classification from R-6 
Residential District to A-2 
Apartment District on 
certain property beginning 
1480 feet more or less from 
the southwest corner of 
Kempsville Road and 
Providence Road running 
460 feet more or less In a 
southwesterly direction 
from Providence Road 
from there running along a 
curve to the left of length 
approximately 400 feet and 
a radius 400 feet mor'e or 
less from there running 360 
feet more or less In. a 
southeasterly direction; 
from there running 350 feet 
more or less In a 
southwesterly direction; 
from there running 280 feet 
more or less In a 
northwesterly direction; 
from there running 370 feet 
more or less; from there 
running 260 feet more or 
less in a northerly 
direction; from there 
running 200 feet more or 
less in a northeasterly 
direction; from there 
running 200 feet more or 
less in a northerly 
direction; from there 
running 510 feet more or 
less in a northeasterly 
direction to the south side of 
Providence Road; from 
there running 655 feet more 
or less In a southeasterly 
direction along the south 
side of Providence Road. 
Said parcel contains 15^5 
acres more or less. 
KEMPSVILLE 
BOROUGH. 

4. Petition' Of Jonathan R. 
Sanderlin for a change of 
zoning district 
classification from R-6 
Residential District to A-1 
Apartment District on 
certain property beginning 
1190 feet more or less from 
the southwest corner of 
Kempsville Road and 
Providence Road; from 
there running 830 feet more 
or less in a southwesterly 
direction along the west 
side of Kempsville Road; 
from there running along a 
curve to the right of length 
approximately 500 feet and 
of radius 1100 feet more or 
less; from there running 740 
feet more or less In a 
southwesterly direction; 
from there running 670 feet 
more or less In a northerly 
direction; from there 
running 350 feet more or 
less in an easterly 
direction; from there 
running 190 feet in a 
northerly direction; from 
there running 300 feet in a 
northeasterly direction; 
from there running 210 feet 
more or less in a northerly 
direction; from there 
running -180 feet more or 
less In an easterly 
direction; from there 
runnlrtg 70 feet more or less 
in a northerly direction; 
from there running 350 feet 
more or less In an easterly 
direction; from there 360 
feet more or less in a 
southerly direction; from 
there 290 feet more or less 
in a southeasterly 
direction; from there 432 
feet more or less In a 
southeasterly direction to 
the west side of Kempsville 
Road. Said parcel contains 
33.3 acres. KEMPSVILLE 
BOROUGH. 

5. Petition of Jonathan R. 
Sanderlin for a change of 
zoning district 
classification from R-6 
Residential District to R-9 
Residential Townhouse 
District on certain property 
beginning 350 feet more or 
less north of the 
Intersection of Whitehurst 
Landing Road and 
Kempsville Road; running 
1330 feet more or less along 
the east side of Whitehurst 
Landing Road in a 
northerly direction; from 
there running 792 feet more 
or less in an easterly 
direction from Whitehurst 
Landing Road; from there 
running 35 feet more or less 
in a northerly direction; 
from there running 220 feet 
more or less In an easterly 
direction; from there 
running 670 feet more or 
less in a southerly 
direction; from there 
running in a southwesterly 
direction along a curve to 
the left of length 
approximately lOOOfeet and 
of radius 1400 feet more or 
less; from there 60 feet 
more or less In a westerly 
direction to the east side of 
Whitehurst Landing Road. 
Said parcel contains 17.5 
acres more or less. 
KEMPSVILLE 
BOROUGH 

6. Petition of Jonathan R. 
Sanderlin for a change of 
zoning district 
classification from R-8 
Residanttal District to R-6 
Residential District on 
certain property beginning 
at a point 350 feet more or 
less north of the 
intersection of Whitehurst 
Landing Road and 
Kempsville Road, running 
a distance of 1326 feet along 
the west side of Whitehurst 
Landing Road, running a 
distance of 784.3 feet along 
the northern property line, 
runnif>g a distance of 1356.6 
feet along the western 
property line and running a 
distance of 1184.2 feet atong 
the southern property line. 
Said parcel contains 28.5 
acres. (Haven Estates- 
Bellamy Manor -Stratford 
Chase Acredale Areas). 
KEMPSVILLE 
KiROUGH. 

DEFERRED UNTIL 
JANUARY 7, 1*74 BY CITY 
C ff V M C I L ON 

ibECEMBER 10, 1973: 
▼•INCCSS ANNE 

9 ^«tt«i«ii •! Grier 

MmuuMm tm a Clian«e of 

Of Oitirict 

»i«ati#t» trmm %t 

&•»»■••»» •••ititia 



Avenue and running a 
distance of 677.63 feet along' 
the Southern property line 
of which 409.75 foot is the 
Northern right of way of 
Holland Road, running a 
distance of 861.53 feet along 
the Eastern property line, 
running a distance of 787.74 
feet along the Northern 
property line and running a 
distance of 880.55 feet along 
the Western property line. 
Said parcel contains 12.4 
acres. (Pecan Gardens 
Area). PRINCESS ANNE 
BOROUGH. 

VIRGINIA BEACH 
BOROUGH 

8. Petition of Harvey W. 
and Mevelyn B. GInn by 
Evan McCorkle, Jr. for a 
Change of Zoning District 
Classification from R-7 
Residential District and A-1 
Apartment District to B-4 
Resort commercial 
District on certain property 
beginning at aiaoint 63 feet 
more or- less West of 
Cvii'ress Avenue and 
running a distance of 150 
feet along the Northarh 
property line of which 60 
feet Is the South side of 
Norfolk Avenue, running a 
distance of 200 feet along 
the Western property line, 
running a distance of ISO 
feet along the Southern 
property line of which 30 
feet is the North side of 10th 
Street, and running a 
distance of 186 feet along 
the Eastern property line. 
Said parcel is known as 
Lots 6, 8, 9, 10, 12, and 14,/ 
Block 52, Plat Of Shadow- 
Lawn Heights and contains 
17,000 square feet more or 
less. (Shadow Lawn 
Heights Area). VIRGINIA 
BEACH BOROUGH. 
KEMPSVILLE BOROUGH 

9. Petition Of Acorn 
Enterprises for a Change of 
Zoning District 
Classification from R-8 
Residential District 
(formerly R-D 2) to M 
Light Industrial District 
(formerly Ml 2) on certain 
property beginning at a 
point 500 feet more or less 
North of Baxter Road and 
running a distance of 567.35 
feet along the Northern 
property line of which 
198.35 feet is the South side 
of Bonney Road, running a 
distance of 723.8 feet along 
the Western property line 
(Virginia Electric and 
Power Co. Right of Way), 
running a distance of 394.7 
feet along the Southern 
property line and running a 
distance of 584.86 feet along 
the Eastern property line. 
Said parcel contains 4.076 
acres. (Bonney View 
Mobile Homes Area). 
KEMPSVILLE 
BOROUGH. 

Richard J. Webbon 
City Clerk 

12-28,1-2-2t 



The Sun-Wednasday, January 2, 1974— Page 7 
grounds of two year against 
separation. 

And an affidavit having 
been made and filed that 
the defendant is not a 
resident of the State of 
Virginia, the last known 
post office address being: 
100 Morton Avenue, Apt. C- 
6, Albany, New York. 

It is ordered that he do 
appear here within ten (10) 
days after due publication 
hereof, and do what may be 
necessary to protect his 
Interest in. this suit. 
A copy-Teste: JOHN V. 
FENTRESS: CLERK 
BY: SANDRA 

HARGROVE, D. Clerk 
Tidewater Legal Aid 
700 Duke St. 
Norfolk, VA, 

12-21,28,-1-2,9-41 




VIRGINIA: 

IN THE CIRCUIT 
COURT OF THE CITY OF 
VIRGINIA BEACH ON 
THE 18th DAY OF 
DECEMBER, 1973 THE 
18th DAY OF DECEMBER, 
1973 

Re: Catherine F. Cox, 
deceased 

SHOW CAUSE ORDER 

It appearing that a report 
of the accounts of Virginia 
National Bank, Executor of 
the Estate of Catherine F, 
Cox, deceased, and of the 
debts and demands against 
her estate has been filed in 
the Clerk's Office, and that 
one year has elapsed sioca - 
the qualification; on motion 
of Virginia National Bank, 
the Executor; IT IS 
ORDERED that the 
creditors of, and all others 
interested in the estate, do 
show cause, if any they can, 
on the 18th day of January, 
1974, at 9:30 A.M., before 
the Judge of this Court at 
the Circuit Court of the City 
of Virginia Beach, Virginia, 
against the payment and 
delivery of the estate of 
Catherine F. Cox, 
deceased, to the legatees, 
without requiring refunding 
bonds. 

It Is ordered that the 
foregoing portion of this 
order be published in the 
"Virginia Beach Sun" once 
a week for two successive 
weeks. 

John V. Fentress, Clerk 
By Sandra Hargrove, D.C. 

CROMWELL AND 
CULVERHOUSE 
Attorneys at Law 
Post Office Box 5533 
Virginia Beach, Virginia 
23455 

1228,l-2-2t 

ORDER OF 
PUBLICATION 

COMMONWEALTH OF 
VIRGINIA, 

In the Clerk's Office of 
the Circuit Court of the City 
of Virginia Beach, on the 
11th day of December, 1973. 
McPherson Corprew, 
PlalntlH, 
against 
Alice Corprew, Defendant. 

Theobject of this suit Is to 
obtain a divorce A Vinculo 
Matrimonii from the said 
defendant, upon the 
grounds of two years 
mutual separation. 

And an affidavit ^having 
been made and filed that 
the defendant is not a 
resident of the State of 
Virginia, the last known 
post office address being: 
362 Handcock Street, 
Brooklyn, New York. 

It is ordered that she do 
appear here within ten (10) 
days after due publication 
hereof, and do what may be 
necessary to protect her 
interest in this suit. 
A copy Teste: JOHN V 
FENTRESS: CLERK 
BY: Sandra Hargrove 
D.CIerk 

Seymour M. Teach 
617 Law Bidg. 
Norfolk, Virginia 

12-21,28, — l-2,9,-4t 



OROBROF 
PUBLICATION 

COMMONWEALTH OF 
VIRGINIA, 

In" the Clerk's Office of 
«»«Cltcull Court of the City 
of Virginia Beach, on the 
11th day of December, 1973. 
Jowt Marie Rlner Burgess, 
Plalntwt, 
ayaiNst 

Tlin^y Eugene Burgess, 
Pafawia t^. 

■ttw^lact el thit t„lt u f, 

• «H»«ee A Vinculo 

9m said 

the 



ORDER OF 
PUBLICATION 

Commonwealth >f Virginia 

In the Clerk's Office of 
tha4H|rcuIt Court of that City 
orv%i^nia Beach, on thtt 
14th day of December, 1973 
Dixie Lee Jones Dawson, 
Plaintiff, 
against 

joe Robert Dawson, 
Defendant. 

Theobjectof thissultlsto 
obtain a divorce a vinculo 
matrimonii from the said 
defendant upon the grounds 
that the parties have lived 
separate and apart 
without any cohabitation 
and without interruption for 
two years prior to the 
commencement of this suit. 

And an affidavit having 
been made and filed that 
the defandant is a non- 
resident of the State of 
Virginia, the last known 
post office address being: 
1310 LIndwood Street, 
Greensboro, North 
Carolina. 

It is ordered that he do 
appear here within ten (10) 
days after due publication 
hereof, and do what may be 
necessary to protect his 
Interest in this suit. 
A copy-Teste: John V. 
Fentress, Clerk 
By: J. Curtis Fruit, Deputy 
Clerk 

Moss 8i Moss 
830 Maritime Tower 
Norfolk, Virginia 

12-21,28,— 1-2,9 -41 



ORDER 

VIRGINIA: 

In the Clerk's Office of 

the Circuit Court of the City 

of Virginia Beach, on the 

13th day of December, 1973. 

In Chancery 

No. C-73-1636 

In re: Adoption of Sheryl 
Lynn Eades and Larry 
Dean Eades, Jr. 
By: Mary Louise Ambrose 
and Wlllard Lee Ambrose, 
Petitioners 

To: Larry Dean Eades, Sr. 
1648 East 73rd Street 
Tulsa, Oklahoma 

This day 'came Mary 
Louise Ambrose and 
Willard Lee Ambrose, 
Petit I'oners, and 
represented that the obiect 
of this proceeding is to 
effect the adoption of the 
above nan^ed Infants, 
Sheryl Lynri Eades and 
Larry Dean/Eades, Jr., by 
Mary Louise Ambrose and 
Willard Lee Ambrose, 
hutband land wife; and 
affidavit having been made 
and filed that Larry Dean 
Eades, Sr., a natural parent 
Ot said chlldfen. Is a non- 
resident of Ithe State of 
Virginia, the last known 
post office address being: 
1648 East 73rd Street, 
Tulsa, Oklahoma. 
, It Is therefore Ordered 
that the said Larry Dean 
Eadea.,5r,.„e,na,tural parent 
this Court within ten (10) 
days after publication of 
this Order and indicate his 
attitude toward the 
proposed adoption, or 
otherwise do what is 
necessary to protect his 
Interest in this matter. 
A copy teste: John V. 
Fentress. Clerk 
By: J. Curtis Fruit, D.C. 
Stelngold, Stelngold and 
Friedman 

Citizens Bank Building 
Norfolk, Vrginia 

12-21,28- 1-2,9 -4t 

VIRGINIA: 

IN THE CLERK'S OFFICE 
OF THE CIRCUIT COURT 
OF THE CITY OF 
VIRGINIA BEACH, ON 
THE 18 DAY OF 
DECEMBER, 1973. 

INCHANCBR/Y 
71-1487 

In re: Adoption of 
D E R R E L L ,<C E' I T H 
GREENE 

By: SADIE LOUISE 
LUNDY, Petitioner 
To: Betty Je«n fir«>ne 
582 Powell Street, Apt. 2 
Brooklyn, New York 

ORDER 

This day came SADIE 
LOUISE LUNDY, 
Petitioner, and represented 
that the object of this 
proceeding Is to effect the 
adoption of the above 
named Infant, DERRELL 
KEITH GREENE, by 
SADIE LOUISE LUNDY, 
and affidavit having been 
made and filed that Betty 
Jean Greene, a natural 
parent of said child. Is a 
non-resident of the State of 
Virginia, the last known 
post office address being: 
582 Powell St, Apt. 2, 
Brooklyn, New York. , 

It is therefore Ordered 
that the said Betty Jean 
Greene appear before this 
Court within ten (10) days 
after publication of this 
Order and Indicate her 
attitude toward the 
proposed adoption, or 
otherwise do what is 
necessary to protect her 
interest In this matter. 

JOHN V. FENTRESS, 

CLERK 

BY: J. Curtis Fruit, DC. 

James R. McKenry 
3500 Pacific Avenue 
Virginia Beach, Virginia 

12 21,28, 12,9 4T 

Commonwealth Of Virginia, 
In the Clerk's Office of 
the Circuit Court of the City 
of Virginia Beach, on the 
6th day of December, 1973. 

ORDER OF 

PUBLICATION 



James Layette Watson. Jr., 
Defandant. 

Tha Obiect of this suit Is to 
obtain a divorce A Vinculo 
Matrimonii from the said 
defendant, upon the 
grounds of wilful desertion 
for a period of one year. 

.^nd an affidavit having 
t>een made and filed that 
the defendant Is not a 
resident of the State of 
Virginia, the last known 
post office address Selng: 
Decatur County, Georgia 
(exact address unknown). 

It Is ordered that he do 
appear here within ten (10) 
days after due publication 
hereof, and do what may be 
necessary to protect his 
Interest in this suit. 

JOHN V. FENTRESS: 

CLERK 

BY : Sandra Hargrove, D.C. 

Thomas M. AfWtnons, III 
1276 ka^frin Road 
Virginia Beachit'i/A p.q/ 

121221,M,1 24T 

Commonwealth of Virginia, 
In the Clerk's Office of 
the Circuit Court of the City 
of Virginia Beach, on the 
6th day of December, 1973. 

ORDER OF 
PUBLICATION 

Linda Rae Tompkins, 

Plaintiff, ' 

against 

Thomas^ 

Oefehdant. 

Theobjectof thissultlsto 
obtain a divorce A Mensa 
Et Thoro to be later merged 
into a final decree from the 
said defendant, upon the 
grounds of desertion. 

And an affidavit ttavlng 
been made and filed that 
the defendant Is not a 
resident of the St^te of 
Virginia, the last known 
post office address being: 
415 Cherry Strret, 
Apartment 1, Dover, Ohio. 

It is ordered that hi do 
appear here within ten (10) 
days after due publication 
hereof, and do what may be 
necessary to protect his 
interest In this suit. 

JOHN V. FENTRESS: 

CLERK 

BY: Sandra Hargrove, D.C. 

Cox, Cox & Cox 

1518 Atlantic Ave, 

Virginia Beach, VA p,q. 

1212,21,a8,l-2-4T 

Commonwealth of Virginia, 
In the Clerk's Office of 
the Circuit Coui i of the City 
of Virginia Bea<;h/ on the 
30th day of November, 1973. 

ORDER OF 
PUBLICATION 

Barbara Parker Verdon, 

Plaintiff, 

against 

William T. Verdon, 

Defendant. 

Theobjectof thli suit Is to 
obtain a divorce A Mensa 
Et Thoro to be later 
merged, upon proper 
application, Into a divorce 
A vinculo Matrimonii from 
the said defendant, upon the 
grounds of desertion. 

And an affidavit having 
been ma.de and tiled that 
due diligence has been usetf 
by or on behalf of the said 
complainant to ascertain in 
what county or corporation 
In which the defendant 
resides, without effect. The 
last known post office 
address being 508 Southslda 
Road, Va. Beach, VA. 

It Is ordered tnat he do 
appear here withi'n ten (10) 
days after due publication 
hereof, and do what may be 
necessary to protect his 
Interest In this si^it. 

JOHN V. FENTRESS: 

CLERK 

BY: Sandra Harorove, D.C. 

Brydges, Harrmars & 

Hudgins 

1369 L ask In Roar 

Va. Beach, VA pq. 

12-1J,21,aB,l-2-4T 

Commonwealth of Virginia, 
In the Clerk's Office of 
the Circuit Court of theClty 
of Virginia Beach, on the 
7th day of Dec, 1973. 

OROBROF 
PUBLICATION 

David John l^otlock. 

Plaintiff,- 

against 

Barbara Prince Pollock. 

Defendant. 

Theobjectof this suit Is to 
obtain a divorce A Mensa 
Et Thoro to be later 
merged into a divorce A 
vinculo Matrimonii from 
the said defendant upon the 
grounds of -desertion. 

And an affidavit having 
been made and filed that 
the defendant Is not a 
resident of the State of 
Virginia, the last known 
post office address being: 
3626 Clairemcint Mesa 
Blvd., San Diego, 

California 92117 
It is ordered that she do 
appear here within ten (10) 
days after due publication 
hereof, and do vhat may be 
necessary to- protect her 
interest in this suit. 

JOHN V. FENTRESS: 

CLERK 

BY: Sandra Hargrove, D.C, 

Alan S. Balabnn 
802 Plaza One 
Norfolk, Virginia p.q. 

12 12,21,28,1-2-4T 



Commofwvealth of Virginia, 
in the Clerk's Office Of 
the Circuit Court of the City 
of Virginia Beach on the 6th 
day of December, 1973. 

ORDEROF 
PUBLICATION 
Linda Louise Faford, 
Plaintiff, 
agatost 

Rdliey Emale Faford, 
DllefMlani . 



Patricia^ 

Watson, 

PlaintiH, 



Ann 



Brandon 
1 



Theobject of this suit Is to 
obtain a divorce A Mensa 
Et Thoro to ee later merged 
into a final decree. 

And an affidavit having 
been made and filed that 
due diligence has been used 
by or on behalf of the 
Complainant to ascertain in 
wtwt county or corporation 
the defendant is without 
effact; the last Mwwn p«t 
oHIce address beino; 2M 



Page S^The Surt-WMtnesday, January 2, 1974 




486-S4M 



PERSON to PERSON ADS! 



xiz 



imMM 



-y 



85th Street, Va. Beach, VA 
33451 

It ,is ordered that he da 
appear ^erewfthln (10) ten 
days after due publication 
hereof, and do what may be 
necessary to protect his 
Interest in this suit. 

JOHN V. FENTRESS: 

CLERK 

BY: Sandra Hargrove, D.C. 

Cox, Cox & Cox 
1518 Atlantic Ave. 
Virginia Beach, VA p.q. 

1M2,21,28,l-2-4T 



VIRGINIA: 

INTHECLERK'SOFFICE 
OF THE CIRCUIT COURT 
OF THE , CITy OF 
VIRGINIA BEACH, ON 
THE 3RD DAY OF 
DECEMBER, 1973. 

In re: Adoption of 

Katherlne Marie Pendley 

By: Antonio Umberto 

Tortora and Elizabeth Ann 

Tortora 

Petitioners 

To Harold Sanrtuel Pendley, 

Jr. 

c-o Mrs. Harold S. Pendley, 

Sr. 

29 Delaware Avenue 

Hudson Falls, New York 

INCHANCERY 
1«744-A 



ORDER 



\. 



Thi»^ day came Antonio 
Umtierto Tortora and 
Efizabeth -Ann Tortora, 
Petitioners, and 
represented that the object 
of this proceeding Is to 
effect the idoption of the 
above named infant, 
Katherlne Marie Pendley, 
by Antonio Umberto 
Tortora and Elizabeth Ann 
Tortora, husband and wife, 
and affidavit having been 
mad^and filed that Harold 
Samuel Pendley, Jr., a 
natural parent of said child, 
is a non resident of the 
State Of Virginia, the last 
known post office N«ddress 
being: co Mrs. Harold S. 
Pendley, Sr., 29 Delaware 
Avenue, Hudson Falls, New 
York. 

It Is therefore Ordered 
that the said Harold Samuel 
Pendley, Jr. appear before 



this court within ten (10) 
days after publication of 
this Order and indicate his- 
her attitude toward the 
proposed adoption, or 
otherwise do what is 
necessary to protect his 
interest in this matter. 

JOHN, V FENTRESS, 

CLERK 

BY: Sandra Hargrove, D.C. 

William H. Colona, Jr. p.q. 

281 Independence 

Boulevard 

Virginia Beach, Va. 23462 

^^^^^iy2j2U8j^T 

IN, THE CLERK'S 

OFFICEOFTHE CIRCUIT 
COURT OF THE CITY OF 
VIRGINIA BEACH,, ON 
THE 5TH DAY OF 
DECEMBER, 1973. 

INCHANCERY 
C-73-158S 

In re: Adoption of John 

Allen Pruitt 

By: William Hayden 

Morgan 8, Phyllis J. 

Morgan 

Petitioners 

To: John N. Pruitt 

2010 Wrightsboro Road 

Augusta, Georgia 30904 

ORDER 

This day came WIIHam 
Hayden Morgan and Phyllis 
J. Morgan, Petitioners, and 
represented that the obiect 
of this proceeding Is to 
effect the adoption of the 
above named Infant, 
John Allen Pruftt by 
William Hayden Morgan 
and Phyllis J. Morgan, 
husband and wife, and 
affidavit having been made 
and filed that John N. 
Pruitt, a natural parent of 
said child, is a non-resident 
of the State of Virginia, the 
last known post office 
address being: 2010 
Wrightsboro Road, 
Augusta, Georgia 30904. 

It Is therefore Ordered 
that the said John N. Pruitt 
appear before this Court 
Within ten (10) days after 
publication of fhts Order 
and indicate his attitude 
toward the proposed 
adoption, or otherwise do 
what Is necessary to protect 
his interest in this matter. 

JOHN V. FENTRESS, 

CLERK 

BY: Sandra Hargrove, D.C. 

Ansell, Butler & Canada, 



pq- 

4336 Virginia Beach 3lvd. 

Virginia Beach, VA 

12-12,21, 28,1 -2-4T 
Commonwealth of Virginia. 

In the Clerk's Office of the 

Circuit Court of the City of 

Virginia Beach, on the 28th 

day of December, 1973. '^ 

Emma K. Bernard. 

Plaintiff, 

against r" 

J. Thomas Bernard, 

Defendant. 

ORDER OF 
PUBLICATION 

Theobject of this suit is to 
obtain a divorce a mensa et 
thoro to be later merged 
into a decree of divorce a 
vinculo matrimonii from 
thesald defendant, upon the 
grounds of desertion as of 
August 13, 1973. 

And an affidavit having 
been made and filed that 
the defendant Is a non- 
resident of the State of 
Virginia, the last known 
post office address being; 
box 284, Geneva, Florida 
23732, 

It Is ordered that he do 
appear here within ten (10) 
days after due publication 
hereof, and do what may be 
necessary to protect his 
interest In this suit. 

John V. Fentress, Clerk 
By: J.Curtis Fruit, Deputy, 
Clerk. 

Boyce 8i Spanoulis 
105 N. Plaza Trail 
Virginia Beach, Virginia 

1 2,'9,16,23-4t 



QUICK CHECK 
CLASSIFIED INDEX 



ANNOUNCEMENTS 



] [ 



MERCHANDISE 



SunihlnaAdt 1 

Ptnenal NotlcM 2 

SpKlal Scrvlcn 3 

Traiiportatlon 4 

Loit & Found S 

Card of Thanks « 

In Memorlam 7 

Atonuments- Burial Loll • 



AurpMonvE 



AutemobllM for Salt 11 

Trucks, TrMlan, JMpt II 

WntadAutocnMlvt 12A 

iOHMi. Trucks tor hir* 13 

Aula Parts, Rapain 14 

AuleAcctts.-PslntIno 14A 

UlllttyTraHarB 15 

Busas ISA 

W»it«dTrallars 15B 

AAoMrcyclas, Scoolars 14 

Aircraft for lala, parts 17 



j RECREATIONAL \ 

Campars, Tralltts II 

Rac.Vatilclaslorhira ISA 

Camp, Spcrls Equip I* 

BMCh Suppllet 10 

Boats, Marina Supplla* 21 

BoatsforHIre 21A 



EMPLOYMENT 



ArtlclastorSafa SI 

Anikiuas S1A 

HouaahoU Goods ,.S2 

GaraBt-Rummae*. S2A 

WantadtoBuy 53 

Swap-Tradt 51A 

Musical Marchandlsa 54 

TV;Radlo-$tarao 55 

Elactronlc Equlpmant 55A 

Coins and Stamps 54 

Jawalry & Watctws 57 

WaarlngApparal 57A 

OoodTMngstoEat SI 

Farm and Dairy Products SIA 

Flrawood 5» 

LavmandGardan 40 

Seads-Plants Flowars 40A 

Faad and Fertllltar 41 

Farm Impl4manls 41A 

M^hlnary and Tools 42 

Bui Ming Matarlals 43 

Buslneu EaulpnianI .64 



I MOBILE HOM 

MoWlaHofnasforSsIf 65 

Moblla Homasfor Rant 45A 

MolillaHomaMovars .45B 

AtobttaHomaSltas 44 

Moblla Momas Wantad 44i 



ROOMS-HOTELS 



Roohis with Board 47 

Roqtns without Board M 

Rooms for Housakaaping W 

RaJorts-Hotals 7* 

RaMauranIs ,..71 

Wantfd-Rooms or Board ..Tt 



RATES: "Person to 
Person" ads for in- 
dividuals buying, selling, 
renting, or offering a 
service. Up to 12 words, 
only SI. per issue, add 50 
cents for each additional 4 
words. 

Classified display $3.64 
per column inch, with a 
minimum charge of $7.28 
except on contract basis. 

Business Rates: First 16 
words in straight 
classified are $2.00 Lower 
rates may be earned. 

DEADLINE for 
classified & classified 
display is Noon on the 
Monday prior to 
publication date. 

Place ads at the SUN 
office 138 S. Rosemont 
Rd., Va. Beach, Va. 234S2, 
or mail to Classified 
Desk ; or phone 486-3433 or 
486-3434. Classifieds are 
prited on cash basis; 
payment is due upon 
receipt of statement. 



I SUNSHINE ADS 



Best wishes for a speedy 
recovery to Ed Bell, pf 
London Bridge Suzuki 
Motors. Kee|>_ smiling, 
baby! 



1 — SUNSHINE ADS 

DEAR SWEET FROG: 
THANK YOU FOR 

STARTING MY NEW 
YEAR OFF SO 

BEAUTIFULLY. I LOVB 
YOU. '« 

Santa Claus - Thanks for 
my present. I knew you 
wouldn't let me down. 
Diane 



PAT - This is going to be our 
year! (It's gotfa be better 
than last year) YOUR 
FRIEND IN THE BACK 
ROOM. 

FRED ■ Thank you for the 
compliment, it lust proves 
your "heart" is in the right 
place. Your favorite 
advertising account 
executive. 



Steve • Thanks a lot. Is Snow 
White next? Pat. 

Steve - Take a chance, 
advance to Illinois Avenue, 
but watch out for flying 
objects. 

Terry - Sorry about George, 
he really likes you! Deb. 
To The Gang - Last night 
was our night. Alkie. 

To God Be The Glory 
Leather Shop: Thanks for 
the Christmas present, I 
haven't forgotten the '/» an 
hour. Debbie. 

Marge at the Emergency 
Room -Hope you enjoy your 
sunshine ad! Thanks for 
your smile. Your stiff- 
necked friend. 

Bill - May we have many 
more happy years ahead, 
lust like the last one has 
been. Joyce. 

To My Favorites • A blanket 
to keep you both warm and 
a pot for your coffee. Ann. 

Snow White • How was the 
south? 

Vann - Thanks for the 
Invitation, sorry/ 1 couldn't 
make It. Debbie. 

Thank You Santa Claus, for 
the beautiful watch you gave 
me for Christmas. Now all I 
have to do is remember I 
am wearing it. Nance. 

Mr. and Mrs. Pullin - I . 
really like the Christmas 
present. I'll definitely get a 
lot of wear out of them. 
Thank you, Debbie 

Rod McKuen - Thank you 
for ending 1973 in such a 
beautiful way. Jeanne 

Rojon Staff; Thank you for 
all you have done for us. 
Johnny Mat^ii Fan Club. 



aSpecMNotJcw 



HtlpWantadFamala- 33 

HalpWantadMal* 33 

HtlpWantadMF 34 

Rtsumts, Listings 35 ■ 

Jobswantad 36 I 



REAL ESTATE FOR RENT 



I FINANCUL,! 



BusinaasOppertunltlas ., 
WantadtoBuyBusmaaa. 

Stacks and Bon« 

Loans^tortgagas 

Wantad to Borrow 



..n 

.40 
.41 



I iNSTRUcnwn 



CorrtapondancaCauraa \. .42 

Local Instruction Claaaas 43 

Oanaral InslructMns 43A 

Muslc-Danca-Oramatica 44 

Prlvatt Instructions 45 

Instructlens Wantad 44 



|fets-livestockJ 

OlBI. CMS, ONiar Pats 47 

M^tfiatviea 47A 

PaBHryt lM pplla s m 

<IWwla*l. l»a « mk 4»A 



nRBCnNUES 



new i— viCT-««p*Mi euiDc 



Apartmants-Furnlshad 73 

Apartmants, Unlvrnlshad 74 

Garagastor Ratit 75 

Farms and Land for Rant 74 

AMvars-Slaraga 74A 

HousasforRant 77 

FurnWiadttousos 77A 

RtsartProparty tar Rant .......71 

Suburban for Rant 7IA 

Out of Town for Rant 7IB 

Wantad to Rant n 

For Rant or Sala n 

Ground Laatas ma 

Buslnass Placaa for Rent |1 

Offfcas and Desk Spaca iia 

IndostrM for Rant lie 

REAL ESTATE FOR SALE | 

induatrM for Sala HC 

Bvslnsas Proparty-Sala K 

Invtttmant Preparty HA 

Apartmants for Sala I2B 

Farms-tand-Tlmbar 13 

Raal Estat* Nottcaa M 

For S«t Norfolk 15 

For SMa Virginia Baocfi M 

For Salt ChatapaahB v 

For Sale PorfsmeuM ■ 

CondamlnlMms mt 

Suburban far Sato W 

Rsaort Proparty for Sala M 

Out af Town for Sala W 

Loh for Sale «3 

CxciifligtRaitf Estat* m 

Por.Salear Eiehang* «5 

Wantod-Raal Estate M 

New Hemes for Sala ft 







DIAL' -486-3433 
or 486-3434 




HAWAIIAN FJ^OR 
SHOWS — South Sea 
Islanders; Private parties, 
Luaus, Lodges, Pool 
parties. Call'Ted Grimes; 
499-1428 after 4 PM. 



CANDY THE CLOWN- 
Birthdays, Promotlonals, 
Grand Openings. 587-3697. 



SEWING - done In my 
home, alteration*. Children 
or adults. Fin* work. 486/ 
7610 :/ 



THE PEMBROKE PUP- 
PETS — Are now available 
for Birthday Parties, Special 
Events, etc. Children and 
Adult entertainment. 497- 
4141, 497-0982. 




32 Help Wanted Female 



Gl1?L TO DO light 
housework and baby sitting 
after school. 499-2854. 



/c 



BLOOO-bONORS 

NEEDED 

Earn Immediate cash. 
$40 to $60 a month. Blood 
plasma urgently needed. 
NORFOLK 
PLASMA CORP. 
J33GranbySt. 623-3173 



S Lost ft Found 



IRISH SETTER LOST — 
Female, since Dec. 20.. 2 
years old. In Va. Beach. 
Reward. 481-1993. 



P3 



11 Automobiles For Sale 



BUICK — 1968 Le Shbfe, 2 
door hardtop, power brakes 
81 steering. Exc. cond. 4 
new tires. Air conditioning. 
340-4607. 

BUICK-1968 Station Wagon, 
full power, excellent condition. 
$1,000. 588-0819. 

DAT8j^N-1971, 12QC 
Deluxe. 4 speed. Orange 2 
door. 50,000 miles. 1- 
owner. Many extras. 
$1495. 340-6845. 

DODGE - 1947 RT. 
Excellent condition. $450 or 
take over payments. 425- 
1991. 

FORD — 1966 Gaiaxle 2 
door hardtop, air, power 
steering. Excellent cond. 
Extra clean. 340-4607. 



OLDSMOBILE 88 custom 
sedan> 1968. Original owner. 
Black vinyl top. Make offer. 
486-3464. 

LINCOLN — CONTINEN- 
TAL 1970 AAark III. Blue 
with white vinyl top, white 
leather interior, loaded 
with all the extras, new 
radial tires, in A-1 con- 
dition. Very clean. 38,000 
miles. Selling to settle 
estate. Owner, 427-1787 
after 6 pm weekdays, 
anytime weekdays. 

Mercedes Benz - 280 SE, 4 
door sedan. 5,206.00 583- 
5756 

MUSTANG- 1966, 2 plus 2;' 
AutOlTiatic. $795. 424-9440. 
VA Lie. 1477., 

PINTO-1972, ,'2 door sedan, 
yellow, 4 speed, low mileage, 
excellent condition. 420-9059. 



PONTIAC - 1967 Tempest 
wagon, fully equipped, good 
condition. $500. 481-5051. 



RAMBLER STATION 
WAGON - 1969. $895. 424- 
9440. VA Lie. 1477. 



AUKCA "PtRtM TO PCRMMt" AO 
Id AMV or TIM ABOVO OLASSiPICArNNIS 

ii.mn-«i»ms-«4. 



COME SEE OUR COMPLETE 

SELECTION OF QMALITY 

USED CARS - - MANY 

MAKES AND MODELS 
FROM WHICH TO CHOOSE 

W«*d like to usher In the New 

Year with our happleit wishes 

to alt - May T974 be your best' 

year ewerl 

LONDON BRIDGE SUZUKI 

2429 Vo. Beacli Blvd„Va. BeocA 
CALL 486-2636 



RENAULT 

Tlie nation's largeit selection of 
used Renaults Irom the nation's 
largest Renault dealer. All 
models, cotors and prices. Atast 
are one owner cars witti our 
famous one year warranty. 

EASTERN AUTO 

«33 E LITTLE CREEK RO. JW 



VOLKSWAGON 197S 

Super Beetle, 8,500 miles. 
AM FM. 853-3075. 

VOLKSWAGEN -» 1971 van, 
equipped for camping, stereo 
tape player, coll 425-7793 
nights. / 



H1^k..T«fl,n.leep. 



FORD PICKUP • 1965, 
rebuilt engine, needs little 
work, S200, also 1965 Ford 6- 
cylinder engine, 170 cu. in., 
$100. Phone 428-0352 or 429- 
5784. 



16 MoJBftycleBr Scoetefi 



HONDA 1973 XR75. 
Excellent condition. Stock 
and torque pipe included. 
$340, 497 5784. 



IS 



CAYTON — 19*3, 13' Sleeps 

ice box, stove, sink, 

water and electrical 

connections. See It and 

■ make a reasonable offer. 

li 



427 3273. 



WOMEN 
Spell m* 

with dollar signs. Women 
aarning more than $300 per 
week need not apply. Many 
benefits-Hospltalization 
Major Medical 8. Paid 
Vacations. Neat 
appearance and car 
necessary. Call Mrs. 
Campbell 

8553027 



33 Help WaatwHiale 



DON'T CALL US 

If you are happy with your 
present income 

11,000 to $1500 
per ntontti 
Is new being 
paid our people. 
Call 855-3028 
for Interview. 



34 Help Wanted M-F 



13 



PROFESSIONAL REALTY CbfiP. 

has excellent opportunity for 
licensed real estate 
salespeople. Advantages 
such as generous com 
mission split; extra 
benefits; bonus; insurance. 
Very active in new hofne 
developments and resale. 
Also unimproved and rural 
sales. Member Metro MLS. 
Two completely staffed 
offices and four field 
locations. Continuous 
training and much more. 
For appointment and con- 
fidential discussion cal 
Paul King, 340-0000; 464 
4979 



RESPONSIBLE COUPLE 
to assume part-time 
responsibilities in owner 
operated business. Should be 
Interested in at least $800 
month extra. For appt. call 
499-5870: 



NEEDED 

8 People for fast growing 
business. Yotr- must 
qualify. 

499-0876 

BY APPOINTMENT 

ONLY 



36 Jobs Wanted 



BABYSITTING - in my 
home, 5 days a week. Mrs. 
Leno, 209 2nd St. in Virginia 
Beach. 

BABYSITTING — London 
Bridge area. For working 
mothers. - Experienced. 486- 
7843. 

RESTAURANT MANAG- 
ER— experienced in large 
volume units. Seeks good 
opportunity. 428-0257. 

TYPING — in my home, 
experienced secretary; 
reasonable. 420-9584. 

BUSINESS Opportunity — 
can make $1,000 a month 
part-time. Call 340-1317 for 
appt. No information on 
phone. 



43 Local Initraction OiMn 



PEUGEOT — 1969, automatic 
transmission, positive 
steering. Good Tran- 
sportation. $800. 486-7843, 



flAONTESSORI 
MUSIC WORKSHOP 

for ages 3 thru 7v Small 
group learning. Flexible 
scheduling. Certified 
Montessori teacher 
Sponsored by Forte 
Foundation. For 
Information and appt., call 
428-6339. 



PEKINGESE - AUC'A 
male, 1 female. Rea spnaWy 
priced. 499-5176. l?C ' % 

POODLE - Toy, Apricot, f 



64 4i'f inen iqwipmont 



OltTATING 



weeks. 

Champion 

855-1276. 



Registerett^jf^ 
bloodlines. $71 '"^ 




WELSH CORGIS 

Pembroke, AKC registered, 
champion sired. See Sire 8< 
Dam. Will hold for 
Christmas. 340-2681. 



fnk BUV-new & 
used office furnitui^. Ex- 
rental desks $49 8i up. New, 
damaged files $39 &^up.' 
Free delivery. 

DESKS, INC. 
3411 High St. 397-7883 



6S Mobile Mome* Sole 



47A Pet-Stud Sovlce 



POODLE - Tiny Toy, Large 
Toy. Black, white, silver. 
Terms. 340-3042. 



SI Articles for Sole 



AVON BOTTLES Very old, ^ 
also some antiques. Dial 499- 
3885. 



Four Pachtnko games. $25. 
apiece, $100 for all. 340^ 
9022. 

GRANDFATHER CLOCKS 
- 6 ft. tall, mahogany and 
walnut, Westminster 
Chimes. J&8-3126. 

INSULATION - 3'j" full 
thick. 4.29 roll. Arco 
Hardware, 3365 Military 
hwy. 853 1379. 

INVALID'S WALKER 
Aluminum; adiustable; 
excellent condition, never 
used. $20. 427-1787. 

MINOLTA MC Rokkor 135 
MM, F 3.5 lens vyith'leather 
case and skylight filter. 
$90. 481-0502 evenings. 

POLAROID Land Camera - 
NO. 101 with flash and metal 
case. Like new. $70. 428- 
8851. 



SlAAntjquei 



ei^T THE 
FlifiL SHORTAGE 

BUY AN ALL 

ELECTRIC 

MOBILE HOME 

WE HAVE LOTS 

FOR ALL 

ELECTRIC COACHES 

AVAILABLE NOW 

DELTONA 

MOBILE HOME SALES 
NORFOLK LOT .„...«53-45S4 
CHESAPEAKE LOT487-8866 



M.L 1973 
MODELS REDUCED 
TO MAKE ROOM FOR 
1974 MODELS 

1974, 12' wide Aigo- 
For Only $4,895 

At 

ANCHOR 

TrallerSahs 

6838 N.Milltaiy Hwy. 
Pot infonnatioa cafl 
coBect 804-853-4554 
Va. Uccnie 1862 



WE BUY ft SELL 
OLD ft USED 
FURNITURE 

SHIRLEY'S ANTIQUES 

3008 Lafayette blvd. 
855-4385 853-9537 



66 Mobile Home Sites 



52 Houaeiwld OoOds 

BEDROOM SUITE - Good 
Condition. $150. 421-3936 

BEAUTIFUL 5 ft. glass 81 
chrome cocktail table. 
Bought at Haynes. 427-2403. 

CHEST $20, Double Bed 
Complete $40. 20 in. bike, 
large car rack. 340-2924. 

LIVING ROOM SUITE - 
Green and Gold Color 
Scheme, modern decor, 
couch, chair, coffee table, 
end table, lamp, and 2 sets of 
full length drapes. $300 or 
best offer. 425-5880. 

REFRIGERATOR — 
lApartment size. Copper- 
tone, in very good con- 
dltioii. $70. Call 427-1787 
after 6 p.m., anytime week- 
ends. 

SIMMONS HIDE -A Bed 
Sofa. Like new. Black and 
bronze floral. $125. 486-3464. 

:TABLE Drop leaf dining- 
room, Duncan Phyfe. 428 
9179. 



53 Wanted to Buy 

ELECTRIC TRAINS — 
Lionel, Flyer, any 
condition. Cash paid. 427- 
6256 

ELECTRIC TRAINS — 
will buy one piece or large 
collection. 497-4213. 

WE NEED BADLY 
Cash paid for cameras, tape 
recorders, stereos, TV's, 
Band Instruments, 
Typewriters, guns. 

LITTMAN'S 
201 City Hall av. 622-6989 



LOTS OF LOTS 

Wc have want lots immediately 
available lor each at our 
customers in either VUrglnIa 
Beach or Chesapealce. Forget 
problems, don't drive many miles 
each day, come buy trom us, come 
live with 

OELTONA 
WOBILE HOME SALES 

The Dealer With Local Lots 

NORFOLK LOT, 853 45(4 
' Chesapeake lot, 487-8U6 
CLOSED SUNDAY 




'73 Aportments-Furnisliod 



VIRGINIA BEACH 

IMnler rates; 2 room efficiency; 
weeWy and monthly rates; color TV, 
basic eating end cooking uterelli, all 
ulllltle*. 

VIRGINIAN 

MOTOR APtS. 

310 24th St. 

428-5333 



43A oeneral tnitnictlons 54 Musical MercliaiHHte 



VOICE LESSONS — 
Beginners, advanced. James 
A/torrlsson, 4284587. 

44 Muslc-Danco-Droma 



GiUMES. 



tm 



SCHOOL 



GUITAR CLASSES 
In Pembroke Ai«a 
Students Ttuglil In Small 
Groups Accoiding to Ages 
Aftci4P.M. 499-1428 



ORGAN — Orcoa Concert, 
like new. $150. 420-3319. 

PIANO - Stelnway, upright. 
$800. 428-6734. 

SNARE DRUM Red sparkle, 
needs heads, otherwise In 
excellent shape. Good for a 
beginner. $10. Dial 427-1787. 

■■■■■■■■■■^i^iHami 
56 Coim and Stamps 



77 tteuses lor Rent 

PRINCESS ANNE PLAZA:. 
Newly painted, 3 bedrooms, 
2 bath ranch, with den and 
garage on fenced lot. Fully 
carpeted. 486-3800 or 481- 
6429. 

REAL ESTATE CORP. 

OF VIRGINIA 

"For the People" 

PRINCESS ANNE PLAZA 
— beautiful 3 bedrm. 
Townhouse, carpet down, 
oak floorsup. Electric heat, 
central air. $215 mo. 428- 
6265. 

■3 bedrooms, 2 baths, on 
quiet court. Central air, eat- 
in kitchen with dishwasher, 
disposal and refrigerator. 
Family rm. with fireplace. 
Fenced yard. Some drapes 
and carpet included. $300 
mo. 340-2070. 



THOROUGHGOOD- 



m 



} bedroom, 2 baths and 
(amily room with fireplace. 
Call O.D. King 460-1177; 
481-0227. 

PROFESSIONAL REALTY CORP. 




BUYING 

SILVER COINS 

BEFCmE IIM 

HIGHEST PRICES PAID! 
NORVIEW COIN SHOP 

Discount on all 
Supplies with this Ad 
6S12SewellsPt. Rd. 

Phone 853-8118 



47 Pop, Cits, Otter Bats 

GREAT DANES — AKC, $150 
and up. 1st shot, wormed. 588- 
0358. 

GREAT DANE AKC 

registered, black, terms. 
428 8578 

GERMAN SHEPHERDS - 
registered, females, 5 
months. 486-7836. 

IRISH SETTER PUPS - 
AKC registered. Shots, 
wormed. 440-0457 



<7AWeMiiigAppaiei 



78 Wesoft Preporty-Bowt 

HOUSES Si 
APARTMENTS 
available on a yearly or 
short term basis. 
DUCKS REAL ESTATE 
323Lasklnrd. 
428 4882 

tf SIA Otfices-Dealc Space 



MINK' COAT — Blonde, 
maxl,slze 10-12. Cost $1,250, 
sell $625. New. 340-9135. 



63 toildlnt Materials 



HOME Builders 8, Con 
tractors Let us help you 
*»lth that new «home' 
additions or repairs, ^e 
can furnish materials 
from basement to attic 
and aid you in financing. 
Phone KELLAM & 
EATON 427 3200. 



PRIME OFFICE SPACE 
New space available in 
modern. SUN building at^ 
'138 S, Rosemont Rd. nfexf 
to Expressway. Large andi 
small unit for several 
office use, ready for you. 
Call 486-3430. 

SSFotSdeNoi&tt 



NORVA HOMES 4 

bedrooms, 2 baths, near 
shopping, bus and schools. 
Call Joe Robinson, 464 4839. 
We trade Higgins Realty, 
Inc., 4864041. 




'86 For Sale Virgihia Boadi 



ALAIJITON- 



€XCELLENT BUY 

Over 3,000 square feet of 
comfortable living on 
country size lot. Good 
financing'. New Hilltop 
area. Ocean and hospital. 
340-0000; Jean Cordle, 481- 
4299. 

PROFESSIONAL REALTY CORP. 



BIRDNECK POINT- 



m 



5 bedrooms, 4V7 baths. 
Older home loaded with 
charm and renovated for 
modern comfort. Call for 
appointment, 340-0000; 
Barbara Klfirkpatrick, 486- 
4324. 

PROFESSIONAL REALTY CORP. 



—CAPE HENRY SHORES- 

LARGEANDLOVELY 
Completely carpeted 5 
bedroom ranch on deep 
water bulkheaded lot. Huge 
beamed ceiling den has 
raised hearth fireplace. 
Screened porch opens from 
eat-In kitchen, separate 
utilit;/ room, 2 door garage. 
Qwner will finance. 486- 
3800, 481-6429, 481-6866. 
REAL ESTATE CORP. 
OFVIRGINIA 
"FOR THE PEOPLE" 



CHESAPEAKE BEACH- 



BARE FACTS 

Charm and space In 2-story 
older home. Direct access 
to boating and fishing. 
Loveiywaterview. 460-1177; 
Beth Bare, 481-6032. 

PROFESSIONAL REALTY CORP. 



GREAT NECK POINT - 11 
room Split-Level on 1 acce 
corner lot. Central. ^tU 
condition, fireplace and wet 
bar. Room for swimming 
pool and tennis court. 481- 
6382. 

GOTNG, GOiNG, GdNEf 
— Sell your home fast with 
a Sun Classified Ad! Call 
486-3433. 



KING'S GRANT- 



POOL AND PATIO 

Look ahead to warm 
weather entertaining. 
Lovely 9 bedroom, 2V2 bath 
Colonial on large wooded 
lot. Screen porch 

overlooking pool and 
beautiful backyard. Low 
50's 340-0000; Tom 
Wynkoop, 340-0329. 

PROFESSIONAL REALTY CORP. 



PRINCESS ANNE PLAZA — 
Split foyer, 4 bedrooms, 2 
baths, panelled den, 2 kit- 
chens, 2-car garage, and 
trees! Call Jim Hill, 547-5339. 
We trade. Higgins Realty, 
Inc., 486-4041. 



SANDBRiOGE- 



WHY 

Wait till next season to own 
this 3 bedroom home at 
Sandbridge? 340-0000; Don 
Kay, 481-0358. 

PROFESSIONAL REALTY CORP. 



THOROUGHGOOD 
ESTATES 



BARE FACTS 

Super clean, 3 bedroom 
Colonial ranch on picture 
book lot. Vacant and 
waiting for the lucky 
buyer! 460-1177; Beth Bare, 
481-6032. 

PROFESSIONAL REALTY CORP. 



WINDSOR WOODS — 
CharrhIng, warm and 
immaculate 4 bedroom 
Colonial with den, fireplace 
and built-in kitchen. 
Beautifully landscaped. 
Call Mary Rau, 486-3248. We 
trade. Higgins Realty, 486- 
4041. 



WINDSOR OAKS WEST- 



QUICK POSESSION 

on 5 bedroom 2 story 
Colonial. All the amenities 
included. Work shop In 
double garage. For details, 
340-0000; SherrI Parkinson, 
425-9212. 

PROFESSIONAL REALTY CORP.r 



87 For Sale Cheeapoalw 

GEORGETOWN COLONY 
Large 3 t>edroom brick 
luxury home. Owner will 
help finance. Call Joe 
Robinson, 462-4839. We 
trade. Higgins Realty, Inc., 
486-4041. 



96 Wiated R«^ Ertate 

CASH TALKS 

We buy 8. sell. Need Homes. 
Call 464-6205. Crowgey 
Realty. 



) 



Safe methods 
for gasoline 
home storage 

B{f Peter Weaver 

Q. I heard a neighbor say her husband was storing 

gasoline cuis in the garage. We were thinking of 

doingthe same thing but want to know how safe it is. — 

Mrs. C. S., Alexanchia, V&. 

A. Thtare is really no "safe" way to store gasoi 

. around^ home. Some methods are l«ss dangerous than 

others. If you must store gasoline, keep it out of the 

home and out of the back of your car (the sun't heat 

'.» could make the.container pop open). 

-t, Be sure that the container is U-L (Underwriter- 
Laboratory- approved. The socalled "safety can" is 

'^^Maie'of metal and has a spring-latch top which saafs 

^^hut if the can is dropp^ accidentally. Metal con- 
tainers are the best. Plastic containers are next best 
and glass containers should never be used for gasoline. 
Any gasoline container should have enough "head 
room" which means it needs several inches of air 
space at the top so it can expand. Gasoline should 

'_! never be stored inside t>ecause the fumes collect in 

lower areas (the basement or utility room) and could 

I explode When the water heater ignites. Gasoline should 

be stored high up (away from children) in a ven- 

,1 tilated area away from your home. 

Most states and local communities have laws on the 
books which prohibit the hoarding of gasoline or limit 
storage to a gdlon or so. If your gasoline ignites acci- 
dentally, your fire insurance and liabiUty coverage 
may be nullified by the fact you were breaking the 
' local fire laws. 

Mina l^ur Money 



Q. I have ah older home with several windows which 
have been ,paj|ttfd shut. How can I remedy this 
situtation? — K.M., Broken Bow, Neb. 

A. The National Paint and (3oating Association says 
the best method for opening your windows is to run a 
sharp edge (a razor or a knife) aWng the cracks sealed 
by the paint. Then pull the window open. Don't use 
paint solvent to break the seal. It coidd dis^lve the 
paint and damage the window sill or frame. 



I K 



V 



■T 



Q. I>e been told that preservatives such as for- 
maldehyde are being used in the making of ice cream. 
Is this true? — E.C.F., Ventura, Calif. . 

A. According to the Center for Science in the Public 
Interest, preservatives are not used iri ice cream. 
Freezing the ice cream preserves it. For further 
questions on food additives, -write: Center for Science 
in the Public Interest; Number 812; 1346 Connecticut 
Ave.; Washington, p. C. 20036. 

Q. The inside rims of our bathroom bowls have an 
ugly lime (teposit from the water. Several stain 
removers and steel wool haven't worked. What next? 
— Mrs. M. R., Rossville,' Kan. 

A. Since these bowls are made of vitreous china and 
not porcelain, you can try some acids for stain 
removal. A cloth soaked in vinegar or lemon juice 
might do the trick. Leave it on for several hours. If this 
doesn't work, try a diluted solution of oxalic acid 
(found in most hardware stores) with one part acid to 
ten parts water mixed with commeal. Apply it as a 
paste, scrub with steel wool and then rinse. 

Wear rubber gloves and keep the acid away from 
children and metals. 

King Features Syndicate, Inc., 1973. 

Peter Weaver wekomes questions from readers for pos- 
sible use in his column. Please send letters to him in car€ 
of Virginia Beach Sun, 138 Rosemont Road, Virginia 
Beach, Va. 23451 



j^/IRS to help 
with returns 



t 



■ The Internal Revenue 
'■ Service (IRS) is again this 

year offering a no-charge 

phone service to assist in 
,the preparation of 1973 

federal income tax returns. 



The program will be 

available to those having 

questions about their taxes 

six days a week throughout 

. the tax filing period mding 

■^-Aprtt 15. "- — ' — ^ »- 



SHOW 
YOUR COLORS 

Auto Antenna Flag 
with gold fringe. 

ONLY 59* EACH 

Includes tax and postage 

No Stamps or CODs Please 

double "G" enterprises 

PC Box 572 
Virginia Beach, \fa. 23451 



Residents of Virginia 
Beach, Norfolk, Ports- 
mouth and Chesapeake 
seeking assistance with tax 
returns may contact the 
IRS by phoning 424^770. 



PLANNINGIO MOVE- 
TO NORFOLK AREA? 

We have homes avail- 
able in all price 
ranges. Contact my 
professional staff be- 
fore you buy your 
desired home. 

JOHNM. 
WRIGHT 

REALTY. INC. 

1964LASKINRD. 
. VA. BEACH, VA. 
425-8702 

Members of Realtors MLS 



4 J 



To buy, sell or trade your 

home, call us right now. 

We can give you quick results! 

CALL 340-8311 

Fred Soles, Mgr. 
^Ib»JJarll^,ailf 

Gwwrri RmI Estita 
1 1$ Lo^hM ^iiif* SM^inf C«iter 
^ftr#nla Bm^ Va. 




Virginia Beacn Real Estate 

illhere The LiyiA9 1/ Leyelif 

FinanC^/BusineSs/EcOnOiny Xh* Sun-Wedn«sday. January 2. 1974-Page 9 



Realtor associates complete 
graduate institute course 



How to get around while coping 
with limitsd 





ine sufmues^ 



Start your own tran'k- 
portation company? 

You may have to do it (at 
least as a frame of mind) to 
cope with the greatest 
transportation mess this 
country has ever faced. 

For years we have been 
lulled into a false sense of 
security, believing that our 
supply of gasoline was 
unlhnited. Now, we know 
the truth. It's confusing to 
many of us who never 
dreamed our personal 
wheels would ever be 
severely restricted. To sort 
out this 'situation, you 
might consider setting 
aside a special trans- 
portation file where you 
keep records, receipts aiyl 
other personal or family 
finance information. Some 
possible items: 

AUTOMOBILE: Make a 
priority list. What are the 
most essential — least 
essential — needs for your 
car? What is your car's 
local mileage range on a 
tankful of gas? Small cars 
have a greater range but 
can't carry many people or 
groceries. Big cars have 
less range but can carry 
more people, groceries and 
cargo in pooling situations. 

Find a regular, neigh- 
borhood gasoUne supplier 
and stick with him. When 



-"& 



.Series 



This is tte first article of a three-part series in which con- 
sumer columnist^ Peter Weaver tells how to cope with the 
energy shortage and the resulting tnaaportation problems. 



push comes to shove, 
neighborhood stations will 
take care of their regular 
customeps first. If the 
gasoline^"' supplier has a 
.good mechanic, so much 
the better. Keep your engine 
tuned and you'll save fuel. 

CO-OPS: Professional 
transportation companies 
stick together. You should 
imitate them. The caipool 
is the basic transportation 
cooperative. Form pools 
for work — even for 
shopping and en- 
tertainment. You'll save 
plenty on gasoline and it 
may even be an interesting 
way of socializing. Don't 
forget U)at,carpools can 
present damage and 
liability problems in 
certain situations. Check 
with your insurer first. 

If you live in a large 
apartment, condominium 
or fairly cohesive single- 
home development, you 
might consider organizing 
youF^wn, neighborhood 
transportation company. 

Hie very least youcan do 
is get a neighborhood 
cooperative going for 



group purchase of gasoline, 
repairs and parts. You 
n\^ght even consider 
making an inventory of the 
neighbortiood (or building) 
wheels. Who has big station 
wagons or pickup trucks 
for hauling group pur- 
chases? Who can be called, 
at what hour, for medicine 
or other emergency runs? 

LOCAL TTIANSIT: How 
can you make best use of 
local transit schedules and 
maps? What's the deal with 
local taxis? They may get 
gasoline when you can't. If 
you don't have a local 
transit system, or the one 
you hav^ is inadequate, 
start applying political fire 
to the seats of your 
politicians' pants. Group 
power is more effective. 
Use your PTA, church, 
synagogue, club or 
association to get adequate 
transportation in exchange 
for votes. Professional 
transportation companies 
do this. Why shouldn't you? 

Don't overlook your local 
school buses. Many of them 



Attends tax seminar 



H. E. Phillips, field 
director for General 
Business Services, Inc. 
(GBS) in Virginia Beach 
recoitly attended a 1974 
tax seminar in JUchmond. 



The two-day seminar 
featured an introduction to 
new tax forms required in 
the preparation :»f tax 
returns and a review of 
changes iq new tax laws. 

GBS has over 750 field 
directors located in 48 
states and is the nation's 
largest business counseling 
and tax return preparation 



company 
businesses. 



for small 



Bickford on 
Larasan board 

James V. Bickford has 
been elected to mem- 
bership on the Larasan 
Realty Corp/ 'boar.d of 
directors. He has also been 
named as tjie firm's fourth 
stockholder. 

Mr. Bickford joined 
Larasan in 1970 as head of 
the corporation's property 
management division. He 
presently is divisional vice- 
president. 



Sale 



REALTORS - MLS 

-We Cover The 
People In 
Tidewator- 



PEOPLES REALTY 

486-1423 



SEU.ING...RENTING...BUYING..TRADING 



Youli Do Better With.. 



BISSEH REALTY, INC. 

'*A Respected Name In Real E^te" 

Thalia Shopping Center 
4316 Virginia Beach Bhrd. 

-—» Virginia Beach, Va. 23452^— 

■ 

Mike Vance, GRI 340-7000 LoweU Powers, 420-3802 
Jai± Bissett, GRI 340-5626 Lee O'Brien 340-4034 
Rose BisB^, GRI 340-9898 Ron Gregory 497-9535 

OFFICE 340-9721 





lk-rM:',\'w 



'*mii 



Old ^l)oi|atioi|, 

GARDEN APARTMENTS 

New and Lovely In l^k-LiJ^ Surroundings 
I & 2 BEDROOMS NOW LEASING 

BaMttut ^MckMH roooM^ f^ 
(»ipH«!^ wflh tapiedoaati 
big ea(-to-Ut4«mtirith ontdde wliiAnn 
laige itan^ am la mA ^otaent 
todivM^eMnmni 
bont'dbor ^ikb« 
itoMiWni 



(MI ladapcadMoe Bfd M ftooajr Giore Rd. 
Aeraa fton Hvip>ed &e^tagC«l« Id 
BcM^ OM DonatioB Umm 



mLmmi 



are idle most of the day and 
on weekends. For very 
little exira money, these 
buses could be put into 
immediate use hauling 
adults in off-school hours. 
As a matter of fact, some 
top govemmoit officials 
are already investigating 
better utilization of the 
nation's '200,000 school 
buses. When parents have 
to ride these box-like buses, 
they may start agitating 
for better, safer equipmint 
for their children, 

r' 

REAL ESTATE: It goes 
without saying that any 
new home you consider 
buyhig or renting should be 
close in or near good 
transportation. Trans- 
portation (or lack of it) will 
be the number one real 
estate question in 1974. 

King I^eaturei Syndicate, 
Inc., 1973. 



Realtor aswciates D. A. 
"Jim" Meyer and Tom 
Johnson recently attmded 
the final week of the 
Virginia Realtors Institute 
at the University of 
Virginia, Charlottesville, 
and v/«r9 notified that they 
successfully completed the 
course and received their 
Graduate Realtors 
Institute (GRI) pins. 



The GRI designation 
requires completion of 90 
hours of Intensive In- 
struction in real estate 



subjects. Successful 
completion of the GRI 
program paves the way tor 
further studies in the 
National Asan. of Realtors 
Institutes. The GRI 
program la available to 
real estate salespeople and 
brokers. 



Mr. Meyer, Mr. Jiriinson 
and B. R. Allen also 
recently completed the 
requirements for 
designation as Estcs 
Professional Associates 
(EPA), the deslgnt^n 



awarded to associates 
completing the 
requirements for real 
estate training and sales 
achievement. Thdse at- 
taining the deslpatlon are 
authorlied to wear the 
Estes Realty Corp, EPA 
pin In recognition of their 
achievement. 



Wise named president 



Dwaln Wise has be«i 
appointed president ef 
First Realty Mortgage 
Corp., which maintains 
Virginia Beach offlcra in 
the Tidewater Executive 
Center on Newtown Road 
and at 4336 Virginia Beacl^^ 
Blvd. 

Mr. Wise was formerly 
executive vice-president 
and general manager of 
First Realty, a- real estate 
finance affiliate of First 
and Merchants Corp, He 
joined the company In 
August 1970 as vice- 
president and general 
manager. 

First Realty Mortgage 
Corp. operates 19 offices In 



Virginia, Maryland, 
Georgia, New Jersey and 
Ohk>, and as of Sept. 30 
reported |47 million In 
loans outstanding. 



/ 



^ 



REALTY 



'* 



FOR ALL YOUR 
REAL ESTATE 
N^EDS 

481-0955 



1413 N. QrMt N«CH Pd. 
Virginia Buch, Vi. 234S4 



HOW 
MUCH 
DO YOUR 
UTILITIES 
COST 




ALL UTILITIES 
INCLUDED! 
SEE OUR FURNISHED 
MODEL 



% 



ency 

otHIUTOP 



1,2,& 3 bedroom 

Apartments, 

Townhouses, 

Garden and Bachelor. 

LASKINROADAT 
HILLTOP 
PHONE: 4284813 



BELL 
REAL ESTATE 



3007 PACIFIC AVE. 



428-8322 







.ft* .A .V 




KMmiK 

luin, 



UMTS o* 



,/' 



..i' 






RENT BEAUTIFUL 
NEW FURNITURE 




WITH 
PURCHASE OPTION 



'Incur Mtowroofns. you'll dttcovtr mt convtnltni KOAomfctfl 
w«v to give your apirlmfnt tti»i ptrtonal touch Wid* cholct 
(H styles and accntorin. including TVt. plcturn. c*rp«tt, 
t»n and tMOkcatn Rtni b\ th« Ittm or comptvtt apart 
ment Compttt* 3 rotmt grwtpt trDm$22ptr month. Frtt 
doltvary on 12 month loaiai. 




4V1EIROLEASE 



4995 Cleveland St., Virginia Beach, Va. 
Phone (804Md9-9888 

0«4 WIlcMuck Rd. MwMn Vlf«bili a«MM K»*, a IM tMf nm tmi f. 



GOT 
PROBLIMS? 




Trying to 
fix up 
your home? / 

Want 

to increase 

its re-sale 

value? Want to buy, sell, or rent a 
new home or apartment? Then "Cliff" 

Clifton is your man! For all your 
maintenance problems, and also all your 

real estate and insurance needs, 

call now - 

490-2aiS 

CLARATON REAL ESTATE 

& INSURANCE AGENCY, 

CORP. 

also 

CUFF'S REPAIRS, INC. 

505'A N. WITCHDUCK RD. 



HOME SERVICE — REPAIR GUIDE 





USE THIS HANDY UP TO DATE ALPHAPETICAUY USfB> 
GUIDE FOR ALL YOUR SERVia liiH^l 




Asphalt-Concrete ' Elactrical Contractor Home Improvamants 



Painting 



TVR^Min 



ASPHALT PAVING 

Pilch Ha* |M«cttii,M«t> 



too 



CALL 
4874e«l 




ELECTRICAL 
CONTRACTm 

ComMtcU 
ladwtiW 

D.E. MitCHEbL 
426-7262 



1! 



HOME IMPROVEMENTS 

I umber find buHdIng mMtriali, 
room Addition!, storm door* and 
windows, witli to wall carpM, 
vinyl sMing Free nlimsln, 
termi. 

I^LAM a EATON, INC 
427-3300 



ASPHALT 
and 

CONCRETE 

PAVING 
ASPHALT ROADS 
MATERIALS CO., INC. 

4985 Holland Rd. 
Virginia Beach 
PhOfie 497 3591 



Honi9 Improvements 



House & Yard CiMning 



PAINTINO 

Take advantage of the 
season I Save nnoney on 
the cost of painting your 
home, do it now! Call 
American Home 
Painting Co. 4990446 
Free Estimates 
All Work Guaranteed 



SAME DAY 
TV SERVICE 

call 

TELCO TV ai 

"ILKTROWICS^COWPr 

583 1525 



Bicyde Repairs 



Omt-M Malnlenance 

MidRMMirCa 



Roofing, guttartng, carpen- 
try •nd Inlnor r*p«lr$. W« 
tlx 111 thoM hard to find 
IMki. Fra« EstimitM. 
OWNER, W.J. OthMTlUf 



WMX 



WE DO PLANTING, 

SHRUBBING, 
CLEAN GARAGES, 
GUTTERS & YARDS 

ALSO HAUL TRASH. 

tSl*S37 
IS54M5 



>AINTINQ a 
WALLPAPERING 

Conscientious, first class 
work. Free estimates, 
Reasonable. 

R. L. MAVO JR. 






Upholstwy 



464 U35 



857 7365 



/.flii-»i Mrtiicf Si trice 
Bicyck Re|iair^ Wrtding 
■nd OniMneatd iron RiS- 

VA. BEACH LAWN 
MOWER & WELDING 



Carpentry 




WOOD FENCE | 
CONTRACTOR 




SPLIT RAIL 

Rail* In Iwdwood, »erue«, ano 
chntnul will all locMtt pett 
iralMWd. 

Hardwood, Spruce, 
(%estinit 
L24 L» L64 
1.44 1.55 200 
1.7» 1,» 2K 



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Priced pte toc4 



Price includei 
Prlta 



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FARMS 



Interior Decorating 



INTERIOR-EXTERIOR 
SPECIALIST 

Guaranteed workmanship 

Special Rates for 

Senior Citizens 

FREE ESTIMATES 
497 3018 or 5835648 



Plumbing 



UPNOLtTBKV 

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Call 464-4637 



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ON ALL FABRICS 
Hundreds of fabrics to 
choose from. We also have; 
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INC. 

(Plumbing, Heating 8i 
Air Conditioning) 



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425-7749 



VVells 



Roofing 



ROOFING 

and 
OUTTERfNG 
SPECIALISTS 

Senior Citizera 

Special Rate 

583 5648 or 497 3018 

after 6 pm 



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BfcACH PUMP !£R VICE 

m sm 



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340-3490 



Tile 



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BEAT MY PRICES! 

On any Bstttrown or Kitchen 
tile v^rk. Also Acoustical 

ceilings. 

Call 587 1720 



Tell 40.000 
People IQxNit 
YoyrSwvice. 

To place your ad in 
this dirtctory call 
Mrs. Ann Parker 
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. -^■' 


ICIP^/ b« Ifipe* OolwHI 




• 


HHHHHillHHHRHHHHHB ...%. w^nSHK*-* ' dfl^HHIHHHII^HHi 

Clyde the mountain lion, a tooiist from Oyde's inscrutable f;aze doesn't reveal how 
ralifornia. was enjoying a dip ih ttie ocean he lilted the beach, and no one felt inclhied 
early one morning and scaring the daylights to question his right to be there, 
nut of other early-mornitig dip-takers. 


* 



HASSLES 




By 

Donna 
liktidrick 



3 d.m. phone call 
and other delights 

Having a telephone is a hassle. 

Most people think of telephones as necessities, 
but they're not, of course. They're merely 
convenient. But they cati*also be very inconvenient 
when they ring at the wrong tim^ or the wrong 
person is on the other end of the line. 

To acquire a telephone, one must first contact the 
local telephone company, unless one is Alexander 
Graham Bell. The phone company frowns on people 
putting in their own phones, naturally, so we will 
assume that you must start with the phone 
company to acquire a phone. 

It seems sp simple. One just calls Ma Bell or 
drops in to say. "1 want a telephone." Easy. 

Except for all the decisions involved: Where 
should the phone go? How many phones? What 
color? What style? Long or short cord? Curly or 
straight cord? 

TIIK PHONE COMPANY gets more money for 
extra extravagances Uke color, so they will try to 
persuade the customer to get a color phone, or one 
with push-buttons, or one with a longer cord, or a 
princess phone, or something. They don't seem to 
get too thrilled over the thought that you want a 
plain black phone, desk type, with a plain straight 
cord and a plain dial. 

However, the plain black phone with the plain 
everything seems to work fine, so I have resisted all 
frfione company urgings to get all the little extras 
that cost a little extra. 

A telephone is, after all, only another utility. Does 
the electric company ask if you prefer red or blue 
electricity as opposed to plain? Does the water 
company ask if you'd like tinted water, with added 
attractions like foam or sparkles? Never. 

\KTER THE {4ione company ascertains what 
type of telephone you want, they start the hemming 
and hawing about the deposit. The customer 
.sendee representative always leaves you dangling 
on the phone for what seems like eons while he or 
she looks up your "record." Depending on what the 
"record" reveals, the company may require a 
deposit before the phone is put in. 

The phone people are glad to refund the deposit 
after a reasonable amount of time (with interest), 
so deposits may be viewed as necessary evils. 

Then one must set a date for the phone uistaller to 
arrive. The company guarantees that a workman 
will come in the morning or afternoon, but that's all 
they'll say. After the installer comes ami puts the 
phone in (for a fee, of course), you're on your own, 
ready to start receiving calls from all those people 
and companies out there just dying to talk to you. 

so IT starts. The magazine subscription people 
call up to offer a fantastic "free" deal that I cau't 
possibly refuse. 1 refuse. 

The daiKe instruction people call to (rffer "free" 
lessons in gaining social graces to a rhythmic tune, 
i I point out that I have two left feet, a tin ear and no 
rhytlnn. Again I refuse. 

An «icyclq?edia people call to offer a "free" 
enclyclopedia set, after the first book is purchased. 
f reveal that I am illiterate, then refuse. 

No telling how many of these fantastic "deals" 
I'm missing by working all day while my phone at 
hMne is ringing off the wall. 

The^phone company says that calling long 
(tt«l«nce is "(be next best thing to being there," and 
(h^'re right. It's a hassle wh«i someone who 
smmmIs sis^ciously tipsy calls at 3 a.m. to ask for 
"Joe." but It's a real joy to pick up a rii^ir^ phoiw 
'Sn an wtfnary evening and Mar the voice rf an oM 
Ma^ ofltag frma miles away. 

^^es we tan: pbM» are frustrating; phoo^ 
are sometimes inconvenient and sometines 
^ri good old AG Bell wouM probably 
Ipnk H be kmw his baby iMd ^^fm up to 
■ a red ^Mh^Hiltw prim^ss pnone wRh a 13-foot 



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With This Ad 

Valid thru Jan. 10. 1974 
Complete Hardback & Paperback Selections 

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Art Military 

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Health Reference 

History ' Science . 

J nterior Decorating Sports 

Knitting Travel 

MANY. MANY 

Other Subiects 

All expensive books discounted 
We order any book in print 

POSTER & PARAPHERNALIA 

Suite 210 

HILLTOP SQUARE SHOPPING CENTER 

4250360 



NOTICE TO THE PUBLIC 



Notice istiereby given to ttie public that Virginia Electric 
and Power Company has applied to the State Corporation 
Commission for authority to amend its Pruchased GAS 
Adjustment Factor. Its presoit adjustment factor provides 
for automatic increases or decreases in charges te gas 
custom^s because of changes in wholesale costs of gas 
purchased from pipelines. The present increases or 
decreases in the wlrolesale cost of pipeline gas passed on to 
the Company's customers through the adjustment factor are 
changes that are approved by the Federal Power Com- 
mission which has jurisdiction over the interstate sale of 
pipeline gas. Under the terms of the revised adjustment 
factor, the Company will be authorized to pass on to its 
customers, in addition to pipeline Cost changes, the a>8t of 
supplemental sources of gas, including, but not limited to, 
liquefied natural gas (LNG ), liquefied petroleum gas (LPG), 
and other hydrocarbons distributed to customers or used as 
feedstock for substitute natural gas (SNG). The cost to the 
Company of the supplemental source of gas will not be 
regulated. 

In Case No. 19173, aflernotice to the public and a public 
hearing, the Commission determined that all gas utilities 
should be authorized (o seek and develop supplemental 
sources of gas because of the present gas shortage which 
prevails throi^hout the nation. The Commission further 
determined that the gas utilities ihould be allowed to file 
revised adjustment factors which include the cost of sup- 
plemental sources of gas. ^ 

Virginia Electric and Power Company has been authorized 
to place the revised ad^tm«it factor into effect /or gas 
service rencte^ on and after January 1 , 1974. The re^sion is 
subject to further investigation, upon motion of thexCom- 
mission, or upon motion of any interest^ party for ^eqd 
cause, if such objection is filed in writing with the Com^ 
mission on or before February 4, 1974. 

The application and a copy of the revised adjustment 
factor is available tw review in all business offices of the 
Company whore biib may be paid within the toritory in 
which it provides gas service and in the offices <rf the ^ate 
Corporation Commission, Richmond, Vii^nia. Any in- 
terested memtter of the public wishing to object to approval 
of the revised adjustmoit factor should inform the Com- 
minion of such objection, in writing, addressed to William C. 
Young, Clerk, State Corporation Commission, P.O. Box 1107, 
Richmond, Vii^inia 2Szn, and a copy should be sait to 6t^ 
T. Tripp, III, ooiaisel for the Company, P.O. Box 1535. Rid« 
mond, Vii^ia 23212. Anyime wishing to be heard orally by 
the Commission riwuld so imiicate in the written notice. 



'VIRGINIA ELECTRIC AND POWER «)MPANy' 

Robl. S. Gay 
Rales ft Cmtracu 
V^c» 

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Richmond 23214 




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4848 VA. BEACH BLVD. 
Va, Beach 497-8939 

uuiei locerions. 
NORFOLK 

543 E. Little Creek Rd 583-4531 

1276 N. Military Hwy.........855-0185 

6000 Vs. Bach Bhrd 497 1024 

(Ara-on Frmn Kii^ti) 



■■■ 



'V -^npiijasj**'. 



■\ yj^^Hjii'-' 



MtiermThe 




Aeiimn itt 




SunClanmwit 




For^lrwiitoFenonSMw 

«iee,CAU486.S4S8, 

4864484 


'- 




This wrap's 
circulation 18,700i 

48th Year No. 2 






Officers elected 
to Arts Board 



2te^ 



city Of Virginia Beach, Va. 



Laura Lambe was elected 
chainnan of the new Virginia 
Beach CommissifHi on the Arts 
and Hilmanities and a slate of 
other officers [nrepared by a 
special steering committee was 
elected by acclamation at 
Thursday's commission 
meeting. 

Other new officers are: vice- 
chairman, W. Edward Hudgins; 
secretary, Ruby Timlin, and 
treasurer, G. Stafford 
Balderson. 

The new officers and three 
other commission members, , 
Edwin S. "Sam" Qay III, Hden 
Crist and Frances Musick, will 
make' up the commission's 
executive committee. All 
ejTecutive committee members 
will serve one-year terms. 

Ms. Lambe, who heads a 
Virginia Beach advertising 
agency, is an at-large com- 
mission ddegate appointed by 
city council in July. Other at- 
large ddegates on the com- 
mission's executive committee 
are Mr. Hudgins, Ms. Crist and 
Ms. Musick. 

THE REST OF the executive 
committee is made up of 



delegates from various arts 
groups in the city. Ms. Timlin 
represents the Virginia Beach 
Civic Ballet, Mr. Balderson the 
Virginia Beach Friends of 
Music and Mr. Qay the Virginia 
Beach Arts Center. 

llie new commission is still 
operating without bylaws, but a 
committee headed by Ms. 
Musick is to submit prepared 
by-laws to the next commission 
meeting on Jan. 15. 

Asst. City Manager George 
Hanbury, attending the meeting 
as a representative of the ci^y 
manager's office, told com- 
mission members that they 
should submit their budge$ 
requests to the city as soon as 
possible. The city is now holding 
hearings for city operating 
department budgets to be in- 
cluded in the l974-'75 city 
budget. 

As one of her first duties ais 
new chairman, Ms. Lambe 
appointed commission mem- 
bers to head committees on 
publicity, parliamentary 
procedure, state and federal 
funding, communications, 
finance, projects and programs, 
hospitality and budget. 



Jan. 31 deadline 
for city stickers 



If you're still driving around 
with a 1973 Virginia Beach City 
sticker, it's now time to invest 
another Sl5 for a new one. Those 
persons who procrastinate 
buying a sticker until after Jan. 
31 could end up paying $37.50 
w.iostm4 of the 115 if Uiey are 
eau^t witHKA eiqiiried sticker 
li^MngwiUuHlt one. 

■^^OTf city stidcer, wfafch' 
wait on sale Jan. 2, is available 
at the city treasurer's office or 
any treasury office annex or by 
mail. (If you had a sticker last 
year, a form will automatically 
be mailed to you.) Offices are 
Uxated in the Princess Anne;, 
Courthouise Complex, at 19th 
uid Arctic, in Haygood Shop- 
fiag Center and at the in- 
tersection of Kempsville and 
Princess Anne Roads. 

All Virghua Beaclf^idents 
who operate a vehicle 
registered in Virginia are 
required to purchase a city 
sticker. Stickers for 
autoniobiles and pick-up trucks 
are $15, while stickers cost $3.50 



for motorcycles and utility 
trailers. Stickers for latter 
trucks must - be purchased 
according to the wcdght 0|f the 
truck. 

Of course, if you're in the 
military, the situation cMuiges. 
If you are a "bona fide «Mlen| 
ofTii^inia"7ou must purcha«s 
a sticker, according to City 
Treasurer V.A. Etiieridge. If, 
however, you«re a resident of 
another stale just here on 
military oraers, you are exempt 
from havkg to buy the city 
sticker— that is if you own the 
■car by yourself. If you are 
married and you and your wife 
own a car jointly, yAlh only one 
of you in the military then you 
must get a sticker because the 
spouse is not exempt under the 
Soldiers and Saflors Relief Act. 

Failure to display a city 
sticker could result in a $10 fine 
plus $12.50 court costs if you are 
ticketed by the police— and then 
you still have to buy the $15 
sticker. 




LifeStyles 

looks at library 

otypageo 



Wednaiday, January 9. 19 




By LINDA MILLAR 
Sun SUff Writer 

While the Virginia Beach City 
Council Monday passed a 
resolution calling for a charter 
change allowing for increased 
bonding capacity, the proposal 
may still meet opposition from 
local legislators «4ien it goes to 
the General Assembly this 
session. 

More than 400 persons flocked 
to city hall for a public hearing 
on three proposed charter 
changes. LessttianhaUthegrixip 
could pack into the council 
chambers and the rest were left 
standing 'n the halls. Proposals 
calling for mandatory school 
site dedication with all new 
residential building permits and 
the inclusion in the city charter 



chan 




■frci» 



,pftp^ 



15 Cents 



asked 



of a provision for advisory 
referendums met with littl6 
opposition and were passed 
unanimously. 

The propo^ bonding change 
turned out 30 speakers favoring 
the increase and 11 in/ op- 
position. Despite the three to 
one odds in favor of the charter 
chailge. Sen. A. Josttph Canada 
and Del. Glenn McClana remain 
opposed to the charter change 
without holding a voter 
referendum. 

DEL. McCLANAN expressed 
"deep disappointment," after 
the couficil's 7 to 2 vote passing 
the resolution calling for an 
increase in the city bonding 
capacity up to 10 per cent of the 
assessed valuation of the city's 



real QStatebr six per cent of the 
jtrue value'. (Vice mayor Reid 
JErviiiand Councilman Garland 
'isdeli cas^ the only two 
dissertting) votes, with Coun- 
cilman^ Floyd Waterfield and 
Counci]iman George Ferrell 
absent from the meeting.) 

Del. McClanan stated he still 
feels "strongly that the 
proposal shciuld go to the voters 
for approval or disaw>roval." 



Assembly and indicated he 
would support the charter 
change. Del. McClanan says he 
does not "feel morally bound to 
take to the General Assembly 
whatever the city goyemment 
desires. 1 was elected to 
represent this city in the 
General Assembly and I'm not 
convinced this is what the 
people want. 

Among those at the public 
hearing to support the charter 



He added he would have sup- ^ change were representatives of 

. I lU- I_.-_-.- it >k« ...^tnxs .. n 1 IK U--. 



ported the increase if the voters 
had approved it, but under the 
circumstances will "work 
against" the proposal in the 
upcoming General AssemUy 
session. 

Del. Owen Pickett told the 
council he felt it was his duty to 
take their wishes to the 



'But his back hurt so,,/ 



area Parent-Teachers 
Assocociations, Virginia 
Education Assn., the Virginia 
Beach Jaycees and the Virginia 
Beach Assn. (a group of local 
businessmen). Most persons in 
opposition to the increase ex- 
pressed concern that the matter 
had not gone , to a voter 
referendum. Those opposing 
the change included the Council 
of Civic Organization and the 
Back Bay Civic League. ^ 



Sheriff S.J. "Joe" Smith 
discovered on his second day in 
office that operating the 
Virginia Beach City Jail has 
more problems than he an- 
ticipated. He learned that in 
addition to holding those con- 
victed of, or awaiting court 
proceedings for, violating city 
or state laws, the jail is also 
used for detaining those 
awaiting action by the U.S. 
Department of Immigration. 

According to Sheriff Smith, 
Cornelius Patrick, 32, a resident 
of Trinidad, escaped from 
Virginia Beach General 
Hospital Thursday afternoon. 
Sheriff Smith said Mr. Patrick 



fled from the hospital 
emergency room shortly after 
being x-rayed. 

Sheriff Smith said Mr. 
Patrick was ordered taken to 
the hospiUl by jail physician, 
Dr. Ira Hancock, in an attempt 
to determine the cause of back 
paij^s. Mr. Patrick fled as jail 
paramedic Ray Murden, who 
was transporting him to the 
hospital, tiffned to receive a 
report on the x-ray findings. 

Sheriff Smith said Mr. 
Patrick was not hl^ndcufifed or 
shackled in any way, since he 
was not classified al; a prUon«r 
of the jiU. He «(dded that, 
therefore, it was unnecessary 



Search is underw«l^ 
f Of King Neptune * 




MWw will reign over Virginia 
Beach's first annual Neptune 
Festival? 

It will be a secret until the 
festival is held at the end of 
September, but ballots were 
recently mailed out to the 950- 
I^us members of the Virginia 
Beaich C^t^ber of Commerce 
requesting their nominations 
fm- King Neptune I. 

King Neptune I will be 
crowned dn Oct. 5, culminating 
nine days of parade, fireworks, 
concerts, sporting events, 
special youth events, activities 
for senior citizens and 
agricultural and industrial 
fairs. 

Nominees for the first King 



Neptune must be residents of 
, the city and should be active in 
civic or business endeavors. 
Kay Foulkes, festival 
coronation director, said that 
nominees should also be in 
positions whictfi will allow them 
time to serve as king during the 
festival. 

Chamber members must 
return their nominations to the 
festival office by Jan. 18. 

The ballots will be tabulated 
and the top three nominees will 
be reviewed by a coronatfon 
selection committee. King 
Neptune I wAl be chosen from 
the three nominees receiving 
the largest number of 
nominations. 



for him to be under armed 
guard during the hospital 
examination. 

ir.H. Rumbough, officer in 
charge of the U.S. Immigration 
Service office in Norfolk, 
supported Sheriff Smith's at- 
titude. He said Mr. Patrick was 
placed in the jail awaiting 
necessary documents to deport 
him to Trinidad. He was placed 
in jail, according to Mr. 
Rumbough, in lieu of payment 
of $2,000 bond. It has been a long 
Btandina nolicv of the im- 
migration service to detain 
people awaiting action in the 
Virginia Beach (:ity Jail. 

Mr. Rumbough said Mr. 
Patrick entered the United 
States illegally in 1970 by 
stowing away on a ship which 
made port at Mobile, Ala. He 
iped {Tom custody on board 
and was relocated only last 
iber wlhen placed in jail at 
W.Vn"; ii S'J C, after bolng 
c-Mwlctedoi a. hmU. On Oct. 30, 
he was returnee lo Norfolk and 
or^ed dqwrted to Trinidad. 
1 1. 1 1 



nn 



Ris 



CD 



□ 



C3 



WWCHp 



I 



Closed 
council 

The Virginia Beach City 
Council met Monday for 32 
minutes In closed session, 
open to neither the pablto > ^„ 
nor the pr*£c. TH«4lfeflda i 



tLtaHl tlip only 
discussion at 
matter." 



item for 
"legal 



To our advertisers 

It pays to advertise in the Vii^inia Beach Sun, 
and now it pays even more. 

The Sun's new edvertieing rates, which go into 
effect today, are now $2.52 per column inch for 
either retail display or dassified display 
advertising. 

No contrtTet is necessary for these new Sun rates. 
Your ad in the Virginia Beach Sun will fjeach 18,000 
to 25,000 Sun subscribers weekly, with a minimum 
circulation of 18,000 weekly. 

See how it pays to advertise in the Sun. Call 486- 
3430 today and ask for advertising. 



»ffimf»;!Siiis^:ii$iiS^^ 



If rationing conges, 



• • 



I 



I 



Gasoline is everyday necessity 
in life of Womeldotf family 



« 






5?. 



« 



By DONNA HENDRICK 
Sun Staff Writer 

If a stand-by gasoline rationing plan propc^ed 
for the country is ever put into effect, the Ral^ 
Womddorf family will be in big trouble. 

The Womeldorfs, who live in the Lakeview 
Shores area of Bayside, simply will not be able to 
get enough gasoline for their immediate needs 
under a plan proposed by fMeral energy ad- 
ministrator William E. Simon. 

It has beo) proposed that gasoline be doled out 
lo all Amwicans 18 or older who hold valid 
drivers licenses. Each of these eligible drivers 
would receive coupons ttiabling them to pur- 
chase approximately 30 to 35 gallons or more per 
month (Spending on local conditions. "The 
coupons can be legally bought or sold at 
whatever {Hlce the market will bear, under Avhat 
Mr. Simon has called a "^ite market" |dan. 

ALTHOUGH THE price of gasoline is subject 

lo federal price regulations, the price of extra 

ration coupons is not. It has been proposed that 

the govafnment issue Qie gasoline ration 

^ coupons for $1 per coupon book. 

Mr. Womeldorf, a tocher at Ruffner Junkw 
High School in Norfolk, is the only driver in his 
family who would be eligible lo receive gas 
rationing cmipons under the proposed plan. 

Mr. Womeldorf's household consiste his wife, 
Helen, a daughter, Pat, who is 16 and son, John, 
13. 

Pat \s ' 30 young to receive gasoline coupons 
under the proposed plan, even thou^ she is 
licenwd to drive, and John is too young to hold 
drivers lieenser — - — -i_— 

Mr. Womeldorf's wife Is physically unable to 
drive. %e has a chronic lung ailment which 
requires frequent trips to the U.S. Navy Hk^tal 
in Portsmwith for u-eatment. 

THE WOMELDORF family has trted every 
way they can think of to reduce their proline 



consumption. Pat rid» her bicycle to classes at 
Bayside High School and for errand-running. 
Since her mother has been sick, much of the 
responsibility for running the Womeldorf 
h<MJsehold has fallen on her shoulders. 

John rides the school bus to classes at Her- 
mitage Elementary School each day, and Mr. 
Womeldorf has investigated the possibilities of 
joining a car pool to save six of the nine miles he 
must drive one way each day to work.* 

The gas-gulping full-sized Qirysler they own 
has been parked permanently, and the trailer it 
used to pidl is stored on a lot out of town. 

Mr. Womeldorf drives to work in a Scout, a 
converted mail truck which gets about 12 miles 
to the gallon. 

Mr. WOMELDORF has figured that with his 
3&-gallon a month allocation, he will have ap- 
^t>xunately two gallons of gas per month l^t 
over for visiting the hospital, maintaining the 
household, attending church and domg whatever 
else must be done by car. 

He has applied for a job closer to home at the 
new Independence Junior High School scheduled 
to open in the fall, but he said he has doubts that 
he will get the job. He is now a graphic arts 
teacher at Ruffno* Junior High. 

Mr. Womeldorf concedes that he will have 
trouble if the gasoline rationing plan goes into 
effect, but he feels that there are many Beach 
residoits who will be worse off ttian his family. 

"If we were to draw a line, I'd probably be in 
the middle," Mr. Womeldorf said recently. 
"Tliere are probably a lot of peo{^ who will be 
worse off than me aiod there will be a lot better 
off. 

HE ALSO feels that the oil companies are 
principally lo blame for Ihe nation's energy 
prot>iems. 

"I think every bit (rf it's in the han^ of the oU 
companies," he said. "I think we've been let 



down, and there has been wrong action on the 
part of the oil companies.. 

Although Mr. Womeldorf says he is "not very 
well-versed" on the fuel problem, helias strong 
feelings that a combinatton of "government and 
the oil companies" is to blame for the current 
fuel crisis. 

Rather than see a gasoline rationing plan go 
into effect, Mr. Womeldorf endorses an ad- 
ditional federal tax on gasoline with no limit on 
how much a consumer coidd buy. He would then 
like to see the tax go toward building mass 
transit systems throu^wt the country. 

NO ONE seems to know when or if a gasdine 
rationing plan might go into effect. The fedra-al 
govermnmenl has already started printing 
ration coupons and authorisation cards for the 
US million licensed drivers in the coinU^ 18 
years of age or older. 

The coupons and cards win not be iHoed 
unless a decision is nuftle to proceed with 
rationing. 

Once that decision is made, the city of Virginia 
Beach is set up to administer the rationfa^ |rian. 

Under state law, the divfeion Buperint«jdent of 
schools in each of the state's school districts is 
responsible for admintetering all plans at the 
State Office <rf Emer^mg? Services. 

The emergency servictt offtee was •« up 
under variow state laws of 1962, 1960, 1906 and 
1973. The law revised m June of thia year 
authorized the state office to prepare emeg^ncy 
procedures in case of etrnny attack. 

THE KWOOL supHlntendent is r^^JWiaWe 
for implementing plfns for economic 
stabilization of the city, inc lu din g jrtons for 
consumer ratimilng, pi^ stsbilizatioo and rent 
control. 

Dr. E. E. Brickell, scbo(ri superintmteirt. is 
chairman of the city's e«»»mic sUUUzation 
agency. Frank E. Taykv, supervisiH- of adult 
educatwn for Uie city idiooU, is vice-chairman 




THE WOMELDORF family 

members don't know how they'll 
rope if (gasoline rationing becomes 
necessary. From left, family 



and administrator of the local economic 
stabilization propam. 

The consumer rationing plan which has beoi 
set up will cover rationing of j^ll consumer goods, 
including gasoline, in case of enemy attack. The 
rationing plan was not established specifically to 
allocate gasoline, but it could be used for that 
purpose in peacetime as well as after an attack. 

However, Mr. Taylor said that the local 
economic stabilization agency has received no 
federal or state guidelines on gasoline rationing. 
Although the framework for the state plan has 
been in effect (eiryean, Mr. Taylor said that "all 
we know is what we read in the papers" and he 
had ryeived no details on how the gasoline 
ratbning plan wouM be administCTCd. - 

NINETEEN Citizens ration boar^ have been 
eaUMished in the city, with each board set up m 
serve about 15,000 peopte. Each board covers ww 
to three voting {recincts and the boards are 
bi»dquartered In various (yMricta d the sdied 
system. 

T!w boards uisi^r to a dtywide consumer 
nttii^« committee, Madwl I9 ^ma^^ H. 



members are Mrs. WomeMtorf, IHit, 
.Tohn and Mr. Womeldorf. (Sun 
photo bv Rod Mann) 



Hardcastle. E. R. Cockrell is vice-chairman of 
the consumer rationing committee. 

The committee is responsible for the ovwall 
management of the ration boards. 

The ration boards are responsible for ad- 
ministering all rationing programs designated 
by cily leaders, publicizing the rationing system, 
settling ratkjn disputes,, taking steps to prevent 
noarding and "black market" activities and 
determining levels of consumer consumption of 
rationed items in the absence of instruction from 
the director of the state ecoaanic stotrilization 
Dgoncy. 

IT IS MERELY ctmjecttffe at this time to 
.i:9ru» what the ration boards will do 

,)ocifically and how they will administer the 
■ at'oniflg of gasoline, if it ever comes to that. 
Mr. Simon has said that he is "hc^ul" a 
gasoline rationing Itoi wtfl iwver 1»ve to be 
imposed. 

Meanwhile, the Ralph Womeldorf family, and 
perhaps other Virginia BMcfa families like his, 
can only wait and see what tMppens. 

"The only thing we eon do,'" Mr WomrtkMf 
said, "is «l bore and riitetM^out 



i 



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IWWIWIWWWBMIIIIiWIIilUDyilJUMUiK. ■ ■ J . .'J »asa^8«=ajs«aa»g^^ 




■^^ 



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Comment 

The best to 
Senator Sani 

Sen. Edward Gurney (R-Fla. ) raised some 
ey^rows of his own last week when he hinted 
that Sai. Sam Etvin's (D-N.C. ) decision not to 
seek re-dectioni was t)ased on fears of political 
opposition at home. If our reading of political 
feelings in neighboring North Carolina is 
correct, then Sen. Gurney missed the boat on 
that one. His activities as chairman of the 
Senate Watergate Committee have made Sen. 
Ervin more popular than ever. 

Regarded by many as the top 
Constitutimal expert in the Senate, Sen. Ervin 
will be missed when pe steps down from his 
sMt on 4an. 3, 1975. The senatw is 77 now, and 
wfcn h^ retires in 197^, he will have spent 
more tlian 20 years of his life representing 
North Carolina in the U.l^. Senate. 

^Presently, Sen. Ervin fe chairman of two 
Senate committees and foW subcommittees. 
Though he is best known fbr his work on tlie 
Select Committee on Presidential Campaign 
Activities, most rec^tly he has spearheaded 
effmts to halt impoundment of funds and to 
prcMde newsmen with an effective shield law. 

Since Sen. Ervin was appointed to fill the 
late Clyde Hoey's seat in 1^4, he has been a 
successful senator for North Carolina. May he 

)y his well-deserved retirement. 



T 



ijT 





Jf 



I 



i>l 



lOUyside 

, / - • - 



BfUndalUmkn' 



'stars ' set 



for film premiere 

'■[ Get reatfy Virginia Beach ! The city's first filmed 
^ annual report is scheduled to make its debut next 
< ymek. The "all-star" [M-oduction, featuring your 
'; favorite city officials, will be available for public 
^; dewing after a special premiere opening for City 
5 ^fipuncilmen and other city "big-wigs." (The exact 
^#te next week has not been announced. ) It is ^gfA 
the report will be such a success that civiwMbs 
and schools around the city will rush madly fobodc 
it for their next meetings. (The film will be made 
available to any and all interested giroiipis.) 

Thot^h plans are still sketchy at this time, 
rumors have it that the opening could resemble the 
{H'emiere of any Broadway production. (It is 
believed that the city will dispense with use .of 
search lights however, due to the energy crisisD It 
is not known if they will actually "roll out the red 
carpet." 

Public Information Officer Edwin S. "Sam" Clay, 
yfho has promised "everyone and his hrdiher" that 
they will win an Oscar for their performance in "The 
Emerging CSty," says he even got his wife a part4n 
the show. Doubtless, the part protably wasn't what 
she envisioned when he mentioned it to her. It 
Mems the cameras "fade in" on her hands doing 
the dishes in a scene discussing the city water 
contract. Who knows, though, maybe it could land 
her a spot in one of those television soap 
commercials. 



ABOUT A MONTH ago, Virginia Beach City 
Councilman Charles Gardner suggested that city 
. officials take a trip to Fairfax, Va., to pick up some 
ideas for city {danning. The trip, which was not 
billed as any sort of a "pleasure cruise," did not stir 
much enthusiasm among council members with its 
first mention. (Most councilmen probably had 
visions of holiday vacations on their minds at the 
time.) But, Mr. Gardner's persistence won out. 
After mentioning the idea repeatedly at several 
councU meetings, he has finally gotten the group 
geaHd up to leave for Fairfax TTiursday. 

About 45 city councilmen, planning 
commissioners and members of the city staff will 
embark on the bus jouniey to Fairfax Thursday 
ev«iing. The group will meet with officials there to 
examine what otter localities in Virginia are doing 
abcNit their rapid growth and development 
p-oblems. (Mr. Gardner's latest "crusade" since 
his anti-obscenity legislation, has been to get the 
city fathers to properly plan for the Beach's future 
growth and to fight for the city's ' 'right to control its 
own destiny through reasonable long-range land 
use plans.") 

Up<m aiTival in Fairfax, the group \VQ1 be briefed 
on the Country's $1.5 million plan to develq) an 
extoisive land use pt<^ram to ease its growing 
pauss. Friday, the Fairfax County attorney and 
other city planners will speak on th^ pr(» and cons 
of adc^ting a land use plan to control growth. 

Vice-mayor Reid Ervin and Councilman Gardner 
have really be«i the only two on the growth slow- 
down baiKlwagon up to this point. Perha{», if 
euaufii interest can be parked amcmg the oxincil, 
Mr. Gardner's dream of fewer overarowded schools 
suA b^er city services will be reali^. 




i/un 



Am In dependen t Newipaper 



IMVIO f», 0£AB 



NtAL BRITTWI SIMS 






Page 2-'nif Sun-Wadnaichiyk Amuary 9, 1974 




Winter beaches are lonely places 



•^^■MHii* 



MMM raMJ»NM6 eOMMATIOil 



The crab at top finds plenty of room for 
sand-scuttling on a winter beach devoid of 
humans. Even the unoccupied house in the 
background contributes to the beach's 



desolate look. At bottom, a mangled lawn 
chair caught in a fence is a Imiely reminder 
of summer's warmer and busier days. (Sun 
photos by Lou Roberts) 




Forum 




(Concerned citizens should urge the other 
members of the Judiciary Committee of 
the House to check the actions of Rep. 
Rodino. Informed citizens have a good 
reason to question both the integrity and 
abiyty of Rep. Rodino to conduct the in- 
vestigation of impeachm^it. 

Dr. Alexander V. Berkls 



Reproachable 



Reprehensible 



Letters frpm 
our readers 



Unimpeacha ble 



Sir: 

Rep. M. Caldwell BuUer of Virginia said 
recently that he would like to see an 
"orderly anatMch" by the Judiciary 
Committee of the House in investigating 
ttie issue of impeachment, but he is frus- 
trated at the lack of results so far. Rep. 
Butler blames the confusion on ChaUrman 
Peter W. Rodino Jr., Democrat of New 
Jersey. 

There are no legal groimds for the im- 
prachmrat of Prnktait Richard M. 
Nixon. Hie leading Democrats «ivy the 
many achievemoits of Ihresidant Ni»)n. 
TberdFore, they try to ruin Mr. Nixon l>y all 
means. Those who ask for the im- 
peachmoit or resignaUon of Mr. Nixo^ 
resort to the lynch law. 

The general {wblic ^wuld be informed 
that R^. Rodino is a lackluster pditician 
with an undistinguiAed record. He owes 
Uie chairmanrtiip of the Judiciary Com- 
mlttec solely to the saikrity jysiUni. Since 
R^. Rodino is confronted with serious 
troubles concerning his re-decU«J next 
fall, he n^<fe to walk in the limeU^ of a 
national televised impeachment in- 
veaUgMmi of President Nixon. R^. 
Ifodino is siq^rted by the Fkwr L^der of 
M DenooMM: Party. Thcmus O'IMIl Jr. 
of MtmctHmttt. fkf. OI^Ml to limited 
noiMtak. / 



Sir: 

Richard M. Nixon was twice elected by 
the American people to be their President. 
It was a personal choice of the electorate, 
as evidenced by the fact that Democratic 
candidates mostly were stKcessful in 
running foi|tate offices and seats in both 
congressional houses, while the 
Republican candidate, Nixon, carried 49 of 
the 50 states in 1972. The American public 
obviously believed that Mr. Nixon was one 
of the best men ever to become Presiteit 
of the United States, which was why more 
electoral votes were cast for him in 1972 
than for the winner in any of the previous 
46 Presidoitial elections, exc^ for the 
one in 1936. 

We are now witnessing the revolting 
spectacle of a small Init influential clique 
of individuals trying to overturn the 
decision of the electorate by character 
assassination of Praaidait Nixon. That 
cUque includes a yellow and bewigged 
mudslinger, a ridi boy vtm wants to be 
Presiteit in 1976, a megalomaniac labor- 
union leader, a pinko newspaper editor, a 
pinko magazine editor, a pinko TV net- 
work president and some left-over 
Southern rebels. Those people are trying to 
upset by obscme and perverse tactics not 
only the rraidts of the last Presidoitial 
electkMi tttit alao tbtaeof AppcMiiattox and 
Chappaquiddick. So fv, their ^forts have 
had the ett&A of dividing the loyalty of 
sane gtdliUe elementi of the American 
public and of lowering America's 

repuiatkm atfft^d ,_ 

Jihink it is time for t}» decent Iwt silent 
majority of the American people to assert 
themselves and put a stop to what those 
traitors to their great (^xmtry are doing, so 
that the Pr^ideit of the United Statei <rf 
America can carry mA hit mmdate in the 
spirit of 'n. 



P, 



Sir: 

On Tuesday evening, Dec. 18, 1973, over 
300 parents and their sons participated in a 
testimonial dinner for the young athletes 
of Kings (jrant. Instead, the event turned 
out to be a testimonial to the small 
egotistical group of adults that dictate the 
Kings Grant athletic program. The 
parents, coaches and kids of Kings Grant 
were subjected to three out of four hours of 
listening to this elite group extol their 
contributions to the sportsworld. I thought 
that the program is for the yoimg athletes 
of Kings Grant and that the tlinner was to 
celebrate the end of three months of hard 
work by th^e aspiring foott>allers. I ap- 
parently was mistaken. In fact, I wonder 
why the elite group of organizers both««d 
to invite the children at all. 

I have coached a Kings Grant focAball 
team for three years and baseball teams 
for two years, and I do not understand the 
need for the Kings Cirant athletic program 
to receive additional coaching help from ' 
people who are not Kings Grant residoits. 

Is Kings Grant, one of the most affluent 
areas in our city, so destitute as to require 
the Optimist Club to provide flnancial aid? 
I can certainly think of many more areas 
in our city that require financial 
assistance instead of Kings Grant. Our 
Kings Grant team played some of the 
teams that appear^ to need better 
equii»nent and support. 

Kinp C^ant should give the community 
sports program l»ck to the kids for whom ■ 
it is intended and provide enoi^ suf^rt 
in tal«it and finances without oi^ide 
int^fm-ence and dominance. Let's give 
Kin^ Grant Commintty sports iMck to the 
commiaiity. 

J.W.SiawiM 



ne Sun wekatUM^ klien pom in read- * 
fft. Nanut will be mtUuld on nquat, but 
ple^ inektde your nmne gnd telephone mim- 
ber wiA your ktt», Lett^s ve mt^t to 
etUtb^ to meet newspaper styk md ^>»ce rf 
qutw m emti Write Forum, n^nk Beach &n, 
I $8 R oteimmt Rd.. VlrtUa Mxk. Va. 2345Z 





By 

74ea\ 
Sims 

Sun Editor 

On reversing the 
(con)sumer trend 



The sioary you are about to read is true. The 
names have been changed becatue everybody's 
guilty to (Hie degree or another. 

Nov. 1, 4:45 p.m. — an electric hand-held hair 
dryer is purchased from the marvelous Section 
available at Zonk Discount Department Store. T'he 
unit comes with two attachments, a t»*ush and a 
comb, and {«-omises to quickly dry and style your 
hair. 

Nov. 2, 7:30 a.m. — the switch on the elechic 
hand-held hairdryer fails to work, leaving wet mq) 
of hah* dripphig water on the shoulders of an angered, 
consumer. The unit must be returned. 

Nov. 3, 10:30 a.m. — Miles from nowhere, in the 
middle of the Great Dismal Swamp, the fan belt on 
a Volkswagen van breaks, ripinng through the 
adjacent heater hose and caudng an overheated 
engine. lAickily, the irate driver has a spare, and 
after nine scorched fingers has managed to make 
the switch. 

LATER THAT same day, a permanent press 
shht, guaranteed never to need ironing, is removed 
from a clothes dryer, tumbled into a wrinkled heap 
of man-made fiber. 

Nov. 5, 6:00 p.m. — the hair dryer is returned 
toZonk Discount Department Store. Bragging about 
the store's liberal refund policy, the clerk 
exchanges the broken unit for a new model. The 
consiuner is satisfied, even though the trip required 
30 minutes and a small amount of precious 
gasoline. 

Nov . 6, 8 : 00 a . m . — the van is left at Bottom 's Out 
Volkswagen with instructions to adjust the new fan 
bdt and replace the heater hose. Otherwise, the van : 
is in excellent^hape. At noon the owner picks up the 
vehicle, apparenUy repaired. 

THAT SAME afternoon an optician at Cornea 
Optical gives an eye examination and presdrib^ 
new glasses for bis cistomer. The glasses will be 
ready in a week. 

Nov. 7, 7:30 a.m. — the new hair dryer 
mysteriously dies. The frustrated consumer hangs 
his wet head in his hands. 

Id his apartmoit that night, the shower curtain 
and rod collapses into the bathtub, the garbage 
disposal conks out and the toilet stops up. The 
tenant considerSileductihg one day's rent from his 
monthly bill. 

Nov. 8, 12 noon— the consumer has given up on his 
hair dryer and Zohk Discount Deparbnent Store. 
He returns it and is given a cash refund. Another 30 
minute s and more gasolineiis spent. 

WITH HIS cash refund in hand, the' consumer 
purchases a different model hau* dryer from 
Everyman's I^ug Store and conscientiously keeps 
the sales slip, i 

Nov. 11, 4:30 p.m. — the generator warning light 
indicates engine problems in the VW van. Bottom's 
Out Vokswagen had destroyed his generator but 
does the repair job at no charge. He has spent 
another hour and more gasoline. 

Nov. 12, 6:00 p.m. — groceries are purchased at 
Grub Circus Supermarket. They many not play 
tricks, iNit the bacon did, shrinking to half its size in 
the skillet. . 

Nov. 13, 7:30 a.m. — the third hair dryer won't 
switch on. Everyman's Drug Store gives him a new 
one, which remarkably is working to this day. 

LATER THAT day, the eyeglasses are ready. 
Gouded vision and headaches begin shortly 
thereafter. The customer discovers that die 
prescription is out of focus. 

Nov. 14, 9:00 a.m. — the consumer has small 
cards printed which he plans to hand to every 
cashier after each purchase. The cards read: 
"There will be a $3 service charge for items 
returned fw any reason.^' 

Hie customer is satisfied. 



How to subscribe 




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The Sun— WcdrMSday, January 9, 1974— Page 3 



<*j 





By 

Donna 

Hendrick 

Throwing a fit 
if clothes won't 

I loathe going shotting for clothes. 

The whole thing is just such a hassle tfiat I always 
put It off until it's absolutely ifecessary. When my 
favorite pants develop holes in the knees and vital 
parts of me start showing through the threadbare 
spots on my favorite top, then I know it's time to 
grit my teeth, grab some money and go shopping. 

The worst day to go shopping is Saturday. That's 
the day the rest of the world decides it's time to do 
thesame. I always end up fighting my way through 
racks of dresses, skirts, jeans and tops as every 
other woman in town is pawing through the same 
racks of dresses, ^irts, jeans and tops. 

FOR THE uninitiated, let me try to explain 
women's clothing sizes, which are not standardized 
or logical at aH. For instance, I'm a junior size 9. 
This also means that sometimes I can wear a misses 
size 8, but not a misses size 10, unless the 10 is made, 
small. 

(This, by the way, is a favorite trick of clothing 
manufacturers. Making clothes smaller than 
thQr're marked convinces women they're getting 
lar^ and must lose wei^t immediately. I'm sure 
this is why people are always dieting.) 

Anyway, junior sizes are always made for the 13- 
yfar-old. One clothing manufacturer has > the 
slogan, "Junior— it's a size, not an age." "* 

Oh, yeah? Then why are all the juniors made for 
someone who's 5 feet tall and weighs 90 pounds? 
Juniors are made for kids, and don't you forget it. 

ONE ALTERNATIVE to the junior size 
conspiracy is to buy more sophisticated, more 
tailored (or more ma^'only) clothes in misses sizes, 
meaning size 8 for me. 

Here the problem is that size 8 doesn't exist. 
There is never ever an 8 on any rack. All the clothes 
start at size 10 in the misses department. I have no 
idea why. That's just the way it is. The size really 
does exist in theory, but no one makes clothes for 
the size 8 woman. 

I can usually get by in the junior department if I 
stay away from junior petites (another confusing 
size)^ which are clothes sized for pygmies. I also 
must avoid anything one-piece with a waistline. 
Waistlines on junior sizes always hit me right at the 
neck;. 

IP reo manage tSTlhd a few Hems of clothing in 
size 9, I'm always in for a big disappointment when 
I discover that the 9 is not really a 9. That's only 
what the tag says. 

I try on two pairs of pants, both size 9. One pair is 
too big and one pair too small, naturally. It's a 
conspiracy designed to drive us all crazy. 

I don't understand why they can't make size 9s 
that really are size 9. Why are they alwaj^s size S^k 
or size.9Vi? 

It's even worse when I discover that the size 9 
pants won't even zip up. I squirm and squeeze and 
bulge and pant and just can't get the zipper closed. 
This is when I get mad, knowing that ^he 
manufacturer is cheating by trying to use less 
material than required to make a standard size 9. 

I ALSO GET mad when the salespeople treat me 
like k prospective thief. You know how it goes when 
you go into the dressing room, the. number on the 
plastic tag and the number of clothing items in your 
hand better match, or it's off to the cops with you. 

The solution to all this, of course, is to learn how 
to sew. But since I loathe sewing even more than 
shopping, I'll keep on trudging around the stores, 
searching for a real 9 amidst all the b(^s 9's, or a 
non-existent size 8 in the misses department. 

Or maybe I'll get smart some day, hire a good 
dressmaker and give up frustrations of Saturday 
clothes shopping. 



^People problems 'solved by Navy rehabilitation plan 



By LES LEHIGH 
am Staff Writer 

One itf th^ lem publicized 
programs conducted at military 
installations in Virginia Beach 
is the Human Resources 
Managemat program at the 
Uitle Creek Naval ^nphibiouB 
BaM. "Hie program is con- 
caii«l with rdiablUtatioB d 
servicemen troubled by 
problems involving alc<4iol <a 
drug abuse. 

Ouef Petty Off^ Jiimes H. 

3 students 
win awards 
for writing 

Three Virgioia Beach high 
school seniors have won 
achievemoit awanls in writing 
and recommendations for 
college scholarships from the 
National Council of Teachers of 
English (NCTE). 

James Edward EUer of 
Princess Anne High School, 3^ 
Ann Wages of Cox Hi^ School 
and Linda Carol WiUiams of 
Bayside High School were 
among 850 national finalists 
recognized in the 1973 NCTE 
Achievements Awards 
Program. 

Each student was nominated 
by an English teacher during 
his junior year for the awards 
program. The students sut)- 
mitted an autobiographical 
sk^h, a sample of work, and an 
essay. State judging teams of 
college and high school English 
teachers directed by state 
coordinators evaluated the 
students' works. 

The NCTE commended all the 
finalists and their English 
departments and recommended 
the winners to more than 3,000 
colleges and universities for 
admission and financial aid if 
needed. 

The NCTE program, created 
in 1957, rec(^iZ9s outstanding 
high school studmts of English. 
The three Virginia Beach award 
winners were among 19 Virgi nia 
students cited by the NCTE. 

Motorcyclist 
becomes city's - 
21st fatality 

A motorcyclist has tjeonne 
the last recorded traffic f atitfity 
during 1973 in Virginia Beach. 
His death was th« 21st fatality 
as compared to 31 during 1972. 

Troy E. Loftis died Friday of 
injuries received in a Dec. 28 
accident. Officials say Mr. 
Loftis, 34, of Mallbu Drive 
received massive head injuries 
in the accidait at the entrance 
to a S. Plaza Ttail shopping 
center. 

Accorchng to investigators, 
Mr. Loftis was attempting to 
"enter the shopping center 
. parking lot when his motorcycle 
was struck by an auto at- 
tempting to leave the lot. 

Authorities said Mr. Loftis 
was hiffled 35. feet by force of 
impact in the collision .^ „„„„.. 



Blaiiford, program director, 
says "I'm interested in 
anything «Mch wiU adversely 
affect performance of any 
military or civilian persc« on 
this base." To fidfiO his mlnioD 
Qiief Blandfwd is ai<ted by a 
staff of a^stants who, lUw 
himself, are highly trained 
specialistf in various 
rdiabilitaUve fidds. 

Chief Blandford comments, 
"We're dealing in people 
inroblems. We're not dum|^ 
them back on society throu^ 
discharge from the servtee, as 
liadiweBth* policy in the not 
too distant past in dealing wiOi 
peofde having problems of thia 
nature. It's an honest-to-0o4 
application of the old saying — 
the Navy takes care of its own." 

CHIEF BLANDFORD 

pointed out, "Hie real nitty 
gritty in rehabilitation is finding 
out why these people use drugs 
or alci^ol." He says exc^sive 
use of alcohol" usually starts 
with the attitaide if its the 'in 
thing' to do. It's fostered 
throughout their surroundings. 
Many times it beghis with ex- 
posure to alctriiol in childhood, 
and builds until it increases to 
the point of necessity. 

He says most drug abusers 
are just spoiled: Hiey either had 
too much or too little respon- 
sibility prior to entering the 
Navy, and now they can't or 
don't want to stand the 
pressure, so they turn to drugs. 
We find very few cases of true 
drug dependency. llioBe who 
use drugs include all types of 
individuals from the recruit 
seaman to top administrators, 
including all types of 
professional people. 

"Those susceptible to alcohol 
problems," Chief Blandford 
continued, "include Navy men 
with exceptional service 
records. The last,thhig they 
want to give up is' their jobs. 
This includes top executives. He 
may be 'twmbed' every night, 
but in the morning he's right 
back with the rest of them." 

POINTING OUT most in- 
dividuals involved in excessive 
drinkuig justify their actions 
as an escape from unpleasant 
experioices, such as argiiments 
with their mates, feeling 
superiors are picking on them 
or dissatisfaction with their 
jobs. Chief Blandford says, 
"The alibi system is the way of 
Ufe among alcoholics, yet they 
drink with guilt. 

"You would also be stltprised 
how many housewives are 
probliem drinkers. Especially 
during long periods when they 
are alone, when the husband is 
at work and the children are in 
school. To escape their 
loneliness they will stop in their 
local bar for a 'cool' one' in the 
morning or start 'nipping' on a 
bottle they've got stashed away 
at home." 

Entrance into the 
rehabilitation program is en- 
tirely on a voluntary basis, and 
the Navy agrees not to 
prosecute anyone for drug 
abuseor excessive useof alcohol. 
Chief Blandford says, "The 




TOP SALESMAN 
December, 1973 

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Books - Gifts - Cards 

PEMBROKE MEADO WS SHOPPING CENTER 

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'It's an honest-to-God ap- 
plication of the old saying 
— tfie Navy takes care of its 
own.' - James Blandford 



earlier '«% find th^e peo|de, the 
easier they are to deal with, 
b^ore they have gonf through 
serious changes of life patterns 
or values." 



REHAPILITATION of a drug 
abuser begins with a complete 
physical examination at the 
base dispensary to determine if 
the person is dependent on 
drugs. "If found to be dependent 
on barbiturates or opiates," 
Chief Blandford says, "they are 
sent to the naval hospital for 
detoxification (cleansing their 
system of all traces of drugs), 
then sent to our Counseling and 
Assistance Center (CAC) for 30 
days of rehabilitative coun- 
selhig. if necessary they will be 
sent to a Naval drug 
rehabilitation cetiter, possibly 
for as long as three months. The 
drug abuse rehabilitation 
usually takes from 45 to 60 
days." 

The average basic 
rehabilitation period for ex- 
cessive use of alcohol is from 
seven to nine weeks and also 
includes medical care com- 
bined with individual coun- 
seling for any compulsion 
towards drugs or alcohol. Chief 
Blandford says, "The best 
alternative we can give them is 
showing them that it's not 
necessary to depend on 
chemicals to enjoy life. We also 
try to show them they do have a 



place in the woHd to fill. 

"One of the best methods of 
accomplishing tbis is a program 
called 'Getting high on life,' 
which involves showing people 
just being people and enjoying 
life without the necessity of 
drugs or alcohol. This basically 
is what the whole rehabilitation 
program is all alMUt, getting 
peot>le to be people." 

IN EVALUATING the 

program Chief Blandford says, 
"I have no gauge for success of 
the program until Individuals 
come back and say they've been 
clean for six months. Those that 
have snapped out of it have 
come to realize that they alone 
were responsible for their 
condition. 

"We also conduct a follow-up 
program to determine how 
successful the rehabilitation 
has been and if those people are 
functioning again as an in- 
dividual person. Those who do 
come back to stability are 
•usually way above average in 
their performance." 

Chief Blandford says those 
who become involved in those 
problems includes men and 
women, black and white. 

"I feel with all my heart," he 
summarizes, "that here at the 
base, we may have something 
really good. It's a start to build 
future people programs on. We 
realize we have problems, and 
we're finally trying to eliminate 
them." 




"wsm/un 



NEW 

ADVERTISING RATES 

CLASSIFIED & RETAIL DISPLAY 

$2.52 

par column Inch 
NO CONTkACr NECESSARY 
Iffoctlvii Jan. 9. 1974 

Circulation 18,000 to 25,000 weeltiy 
Minimum circulation 18,000 weekly 

"It pays to advertiso 
In The Sun" 

CALL 486-3430 TODAY I 
ASK FOR ADVERTISING. 




4 



High Spots 

at Night Spots 

in Tidewater 

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at 3733 Bonney Road features 
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WEDNESDAY NIGHT features 
a SING-A-LONG from 8:30 to 
11:30. FRIDAY NIGHT is ALL 
THE FISH you can eat for $1.75. 
SATURDAY NIGHT features 
ALL THE STEAMED SHRIMP 
You can eat for ONLY $3.85. 
Stop By; The Food is Excellent 
and The Singing is Great! ! ! 



BLUE PETE'S presents live 
entertainment every Sunday, 
2 p.m. to 6 p.m. Another 
special on Sundays, Crabs for 
only $3.50 a dozen. These are 
those delicious Back Bay 
Crabs, caught by . Dunie 
Bonney, native of the area, 
who also sells Crabs by the 
bushel. 

To find Blue Pete's from Va. 
Beach-down Princess Anne 
Road to Pungo light; take a 
left on Indian River Rd. east to 
end, bear to left on Muddy 
Creek Rd. 




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OwmrPMRidts 
and Friandt 

The Shack, an establishment 
of 4 years, is known by the 
Locals as "THE PLACE IN 
VIRGINIA BEACH". Aa Early 
Poverty decor gives this 
favorite night spot a kiendly 
and comfortable atomsphere. 

Managed by Jimmy Sellers, 
Cannon and Jack Beilis, 
The Shack features spe- 
cials 4 nights a week: Mon- 
day night. Begins the weak 
with the Winter steak special - 
salad, French Fries, 6 oz. Steak 
and beverage - ALL FOR ONLY 
$2.50 Tuesday Night features 
Ski Flicks beginning at 9. 
Thursday Night is Ladies Night 
- Special 5 for 1. <Sorry, 
LADIES ONLY). Sunday 
Special ■ 5 for 1 from 3 to 6. 

The Shack, located at 218-17th 
St. is open from 6 to 1 AM. Mon. 
thru Sat; and 3 to 1 PM on Sun. 
It promises to be a night filled 
with excellent food, beverage, 
and fun! 



THESTOWE AWAY: Features 
SKI NIGHT every TTiursday 
Night, with Ski Films beginning 
at 8 P.M. The SPECIAL for 
SKI NIGHT is 5 for 1. 

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DANCING 6 
NIGHTS A WEEK 



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Spend a fun-ftlled evenhig at the 
Lynnhaven Lounge, any 
evening at all. The best in 
Country Rock bands appear 
every night except Monday 
night, providing fun and dan- 
cing for all, 

Tuesday, Thuraday ft Sunday, 
The Country Ravens appear; 
Wednesday, Friday and 
Saturday, the Atlantic 
Coastline. 

Owner Jack Turner will 
welcome you any time during 
the weeic; the LynnhaVen 
Lounge is open from 10 a.m. to 1 
p.m. You'll love the en- 
tertainment, you can quench 
your thirst and there's always a 
friendly crowd to share your 
leisure hours with. Stop by and 
see for yourself, they're located 
at the Mini-Mall on South 
Lynnhaven Rd. Take Exit 5 off 
the Expressway. 



^v^' GREENBILL '** 

3733 Bonney Road, Va. Beach, Va. 
HOT LUNCHEONS SERVED 

Monday thru Friday — 1 1 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. 

'SPBCIAL filTES 

Friday 6 to 9 p.m. 



All the FISH 
You Can Eat 

$1" 

Above Served With Fr. 
Hush Puppies SING 
Wednesdays — 8:30 p.m. — 1 1 :30 p.m. 
Open 9 a.m. to 12 p.m. 



Saturday 6 to 9 p.m. 

All The Steamed 

SHRIMP 

You Can Eat. 

$3" 

Fries, Cole Slaw, 

A-LONG 



Pete 



Live Entertainment 

ACT III 

Every Sunday 
2 p.m. • 6 p.m. 



Back Bay ^^^ ^' ^^'^'^ ^."^^ '^^r<!i 

Marina Restaurant" ^""9° 426-2005 
-ALL YOU CAN EAT- 

Thurs. and Fridajf - Oysters 'S/* 

Saturday - Steamed Shrimp • *4.^ 

Sunday • Steamed Crabs 93,90 

DUCK HUNTERS 

Open 4 a.m. to 8 a.m. Breakfast Saturday 

Opan Sunday-Thursday 1 1 a.m. to Midnight 

Friday and Saturday 1 2 noon to 1 a.m. 



Evary Tuesday Night is SKI NIGHT At The SHACK 
- Featuring SKI FLICKS/ Beginning at 9 p.m. -> 



j§:,y ji ^ifom 



Preview 



Falcons still atop 
Eastern District 
wrestling scene 

Cox is still the story of Eastern District wrestling this 
weelc. Princess Anne and Lake Taylor will be the two 
opponents searching for a chink in the Falcons supposedly 
invincible armor. Seven other matches are on tap for this 
week. • 

TONIGHT'S MATCHES 
Princess Anne at Cox 

Princess Anne has lost their last two matches dropping 
their record to the .500 level. The Cavaliers have shown a 
weakness in the upper-weights. 

Cox has no apparent weakness. The Falcons have rolled 
to five straight dual match victories this season. Kemps- 
ville has been the only team to stay close to Cox this 
season. 

The match will feature four state champions. Princess 
Anne's Ken Nowlin is the 98-pound titlist, while Cox boast 
three champs in Chris Conkwright, Mike Newbem and 
Jim GaUdreau. The four wrestlers have a combined 
recgrd ^ Sl-fl this season. . 

Cox %11 be putting on the line their streak of never 
losing to a Beach school. It would take an almost perfect 
effort by the Cavaliers to upset the Falcons. Their 
weakness in the upper-weights could be the difference. 

Maury at First Colonial 

This miitch could be decided by forfeits. Maury his 
been plagued all season by a lack of wrestlers. On 
Saturday, three First Colonial wrestlers quit the team. 
Coach Chuck Forehand must find replacements at the 112, 
119 and 126-pound levels. 

The Patriots hold a 2-3 dual match recdrd. Their best 
efforts this year have come from Freeman Gregg and 
Jerry Pontes. Gregg is undefeated in 138-pound com- 
petition, while Pontes lost for the first time this year 
Saturday in the 155-pound division. 

If First Colonial can find enough wrestlers, they should 
bring their record back up to .500. 

Oscar Smith at Kellam 

The wrestlers for both clubs should be famiflar with 
each others moves since both teams participated in the 
recent Kellam Christmas Tournament. 

Oscar' Smith made the better showing in the tour- 
nament, but Kellam has added some new faces since their 
last meeting. Gene Bunn and George Irby wrestled for the 
first time this year in last week's match against Bayside. 
Their two wins helped Kellam to an easy victory. 

The Knights two most consistent wrestlers have been 
Aldolphus Haynes (145-pound) and Charley Skipper (185- 
pound). Skipper is undefeated so far tUis season. 

FRIDAY'S MATCHfcS 
KempsvUle at Bayside 

Kempsville suffered their first defeat of Uie year 
Saturday against Cox, but the 22-21 setback could be 
marked down as a moral victory. 

The Chiefs, 2-1-2, had been plagued by an early season 
weakness in the upper-weights. Mark Rimarski has 
recovered from a football injury and is now Kempsville's 
heavyweight wrestler. In his first match of tl|e year, 
Rimarski registered a pin against Cox's Bob Stbbte. 

Terry Haddox, Charlie Ballou and Dav? Cash have been 
Bayside's most consistent wrestlers this season. Haddox 
and Cash won titles at the Kellam tournament. The 
Marlins own a 2-3 record in dual matches. 



Sports 



Page 4-The Sun-Wednesday, January 9, 1974 



Sports Club names Kellam 's Bunn 
high school Player of the Year 



,! 



Kellam at Gratiby 



The Knights get a head start in this match even before it 
starts. Granby forfeits five matches every time out. In the 
weight classes where Granby does have wrestlers, they 
are very tough especially 105-pound state champion Abe 
Martinez. 

The poaits picked up via the forfmt route should be 
enough to insure a Kellam victory. 

In matches Saturday, Bayside is at Princess Anoe, Cox 
hosts Lake Taylor, Booker T. Washii^ton travels to First 
Colonial, and Kempsville is at Granby. 



Kdlam halfback Gene Bunn . 
was named the outstanding high 
school football^ player in 
Virginia Beach by the Virginia 
Beach ^rts Club. Bunn 
becomes the first junior ever to 
win the award. The Club's Dr. 
L. Curtis Hall Jr. Memorial 
award for the outstanding 
senior scholar athlete went 
to Bayside's Joe Osborne. 

Kempsville basebaK^ach Ray 
Barlow waf't^ected: by the 
sports club as the outstanding 
high school coach in th« city. 

During the season Bunn 
rushed for nearly 900 yards to 
finish second in the Eastern 
District. The Kellam halfback 
was third in the city in scoring 
with 70 points. Burin also threw 
for three touchdowns during the 
season. In the only game Bunn 
didn't play halfback for the 
Knights, First Colonial dealt 
Kellam their only loss of the 
season. ' 

BUI^N'S BEST individual 

^pefftin^ance of the season 

cainebi kellam 's 24-21 upset 

win over Bayside. He carrieid 29 

times for 171 yards and two 




OSBORNE 



touchdowns. For his per- 
formance, he was named player 
of the week by The Sun. 

To qualify for his award, 
Osborne had to maintain at 
least a B average for three 
years while lettering in two 
varsity sports. Osborne was the 
Marlins starting quarterback 
this season and led them to an 8- 
2 record, the best in the school's 
histncy. Ifis best game of the 



BUNN 



year came when the Marlins 
snapped Maury's 35-game 
winning streak. Osborne 
passed for over 100 yards and 
two touchdowns in the 27-2 rout. 

Osborne is currently a 
starting guard on the Bayside 
ba^etbali team, averaging six 
points per game. 

Coach of the Year Barlow has 
led the Oiiefs to back to back 
state baseball ehunpioadiips 



and five straight Eastern 
District titles. In his ei^t-year 
career at Kempsville, Barlow 
has compiled the imposing 
record of 121-22. Princess Anne 
basketball Coach Leo Anthony 
was last year's winner. 

CARL SUMMERELL. who 

quarterbacked East Carolina to 
a 9-2 season, was named ttie 
most outstauling athlete from 
Tidewater. Summerell is a 
graduate of Kempsville High 
School. The Sports Club picked 
Richmond's Barty Smith as the 
outstanding college football 
player in the state. Smith was 
named the most valuable player 
in the recent East-West Shrine 
Game. • 

The winners wiH be preslmed 
jtheir^iwards Monday at the 
clutPf annaal jamboree. Heavy- 
weight boxing contender 
Duane Bobbick will be on hand 
to present one of the awards. 
Speakers at the function wiU be 
the voice of the Pittsburg 
Pirates^ Bob Prince and 
Alabama Head football Coach 
Paul "Bear" Bryant. The 
jambnee is sdd out. 




KEMPSVILLE GUARD Mason Moaton 
battles Maury's Henry dollins for the ball In 
action Friday night at Kempsville. The 



Commodores won the Eastern District <^ner 
75-52. (Sun photo by Rod Mann) 



BlUon nets 21 

Maury mauls Kempsville 75-52 



Kempsville learned you can 
keep a good man down for only 
so long. Maury's Karlton Hiltqn 
administered the costly lesson 
to the Chiefs via a 21-point 
performance, and the Com- 



modores rode to an easy 75-52 
triumph Friday night at 
Kempsville. 

At the start of the second 
quarter with the score lied at 16- 
16, Hilton drove deep to the 



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baseline seemingly too far 
behind the backboard to shoot, 
but an off-balance hook shot 
swished the cords. 

The 6*5" center, a possible 
high school All-America, got off 
to a rough start bitting on only 
one of five shots in the first 
quarter. His second quarter 
acrobatics set the Commodores 
off on a 22-5 tear during which 
Hilton contributed 11 points. 

The Chiefs battled their 
favored opponent on even terms 
in the opening stanza. Braking 
Maury's full-court press for 
many easy buckets, the Chiefs 
were able to stay even despite 
being beaten badly off the back- 
board;5. 

The second quarter ended 
Kempsville's upset dreams. The 
Chiefs played as big a role in 
their downfall as Hilton's hot 
shooting. Kempsville com- 
mitted tfflLjumovers in the 
quarter, missed several lay- 
ups, hit a meager 21 per cent 
from the floor and offered only 
token resistance off their own 
defensive boards. 

"The second quarter was the 
difference. We missed a lot of 
easy fUmis, and there was Ifilton 
throwing it in from behind the 
backboard," said a disap- 
pointed Kempsville Coach Bill 
Cochrane. 

THE CHIEFS could pull no 
closer than 10 points in the third 



quarter. The Commodores took 
all the suspense out of the 
contest with their second streak 
of the night. Hilton hit three 
short-range jumpers to start 
Maury off again. Guard Vic 
Jones, who also had 21 pqintSj^ 
hit three straight buckets to' 
finish off the Maury streak. The 
streak balloned the Commodore 
lead to 60-36. 

Hilton sprained his ankle with 
nine seconds left in the third 
quarter and retired for the 
evening. His departure was two 
qi|arters too late for the Chiefs. 
Maury had outscored Kemp- 
sville 44-20. during the two 
middle quarters. 

The demoralized and now 
disorganized Chiefs were just 
too far back to take advantage 
of Hilton's abscence in the final 
quarter. The Commodore lead 
grew to 71-41 halfway through 
the final quarter before both 
coaches cleared their benches. 

"We were better prepared for 
this game than any other since 
I have been at Kempsville. We 
knew exactly what type of 
defenses they would use, what 
type of plays they would run and 
what we had to do to win," said 
Coach Cochrane, "We just 
didn't execute." 

"EVEN WHEN we were down 
by 12 at the half I still thoiight 
we could come back and win," 
maintained the Chiefs leader. 




99 



SHOW YOUR COLORS 

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with Gold Fringe 

Price IneludBS tax and postage. 
No Stamps or COD's 
Please Print: 
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Virginia Beach. Va. 23451 

Spoelal Prieos In Oroii Lots 



SIDELINES 

By 

John 
Bannon 

Sports Editor 



Bloodshot is only 
''eye-formation 

Now that everybody's bloodshot eyes are cleared 
up and no one is being plagued by dreams of veer 
options in their sleep after the recent bowl game 
bombardment, certain things should be noted 
before the college football season is laid to rest. 

Woody Hayes should start a reht-^-fuUback 
service for the other teams in the Big Ten. >« ' 

The rest of the SoHth^^ldJliflp "Bear" Bryant 
carry the burden of defeat afreirTUs loss in his self- 
proclaimed "most important game in the South's 
history." 

STEVE CHANCEY has been the Tennessee 
fuUbackfor the past eight years. (Actually Chancey 
is just one of a long line of Cham;eys to play for the 
Volunteers). 

Cornelius Greene can too pass. 

Woody Hayes still won't throw. 

Texas can't pass. 

Alabama play messenger Danny Ridgeway 
should get a. track scholarship. 

Howard Cosell should learn that when a team has 
the option of taking a penalty, which would have 
given it a fourth down and five yards to go situation, 
or accepting a punt which died on your opponents 
one-yard line, there isn't much of a choice involved. 

HEISMAN TROPHY winner John Cappelletti 
should be given a complete collection of Rodney 
Dangerfield's jokes about getting no respect, and a 
video tape of Johnny Rodgers' Orange Bowl 
performance. 

The Cotton Bowl should be renamed the 
University of Texas Invitational. 

Florida should get 40 season passes to Miami of 
Ohio football games and the right to give their next 
Tangerine Bowl invitation to East Carolina. ^ , 

Alabama wasn't number one in the> final 
sportswriters poll, but a poll of the nations barbers 
would certainly find the Tide with a nimiber one 
ranking. 

THE REFEREE who called back Penn State's 
Gary Hayman's 73-yard punt return should be 
given a free enrollment in an anatomy class to 
learn the difference between knees and elbows. 

President Nixon should give Coach Hayes his 
playbook to liven-up the Ohio State offense. 

Hayes should have the wisdom not to use it. 

Coach Bryant, loser ci his last seven bowl games, 
should get a bowl invitation to play Virginia Tech. 

LSU should move for the adoption of a 16-minute 
second quarter in bowl games. 

Auburn should move for a 14-minute second 
quarter rule. 

The .University of Maryland has two rule change 
possibilities— an 80-yard field or the awarding of a 
point each time you cross your opponents 20-yard 
line. 

THE SOUTHEASTERN Conference, holders of a 
1-5 bowl record this year, should move to accept 
bowl invitations only when ACC teams are the 
opposition. 

The toughest thing Ohio State did in the Rose 
Bowl was hoist Coach Hayes on their shoulders. 

Joe Patemo should get a schedule where his 
annual claims of Penn State being number one in 
the nation would have some foundation. 

Houston was the most underrated team in the 
ration, or Tulane was the nation's worst 9-3 team. 

One good thing about Cosell's Sugar Bowl 
appearance was Duffy Daugherty didn't get to talk. 

One bad thing about Cosell's Sugar Bowl 
performance— hci talked. 

This was a great year for college football on 
television. Thanksgiving weekend ABC invaded our 
homes with nine of the top ten college teams. 
-" Included in the holiday fare was the "game of the 
century" with Ohio State facing Michigan. Just a 
scant five weeks later. ABC was back with yet 
another "game of the century" with Alabama- 
Notre Dame. 

The fanfare is over now for at least nine months 
and the nation can rest calmly with the knowledge 
that Cosell really does like the college's two-point 
conversion rule. 

Cox's Robinson becomes 
5th Beach player to sign 

Cox's Randy Robinson college athletic scholarship, 
became the fifth Virginia Beach -'The 6'4" 220-pound senior 
high school senior to sign a signed with Norfolk Statd. 

Robinson was a first team 
selection at fullback and 
defensive end on this year's Sun 
Coaches All-City team. He was 
Cox's leading ground gainer 
rushing for over 700 yards. 
Robinson finished second to 
Bayside's Roscoe Coles in the 
city scoring race with 76 points. 

Robinson's biggest play of the 
year came in the FalcoiH 
opener against Princess Anne. 
He intercepted a Cavalier pass 
and returned it 25 yards for the 
game's only touchdown. 



I 
[ 

1 
I 



VIRGINIA 
BEACH 

ENGRAVtNG & 

TROPHY CO. 

Tropbta. naqnes. Aimdi 

Machine Ei^Ariq| 

Oi^ A. Montgomery^ 

President 
4968 HoUand^^. Stiite C 




^MM^^ 



Th« Surr-W«dn«jdiy, January 9, 1974-Pa9« 5 



Eastern District basketball season enters 2nd week 



ByJOHNBANNON 
SportoEdltor 

The six Virginia Beac6 tugh school basketball teams 
contiifMie their search for berths in the Eastern District 
tourMmrat.Onlyd^tofthe 11 district teams can qualify 
for the toum^. Princen Anne will be trying to continue 
their iidn^ ways while the other schools will be se«r- 
ching to rebound from rough starts in the second week of 
district play. 

FRIDAY'S GAMES 
BaysideatKeUam 

Bayside began their season with great expectations. 
Eight games later the Marlins have a 5-3 mark. The latest 
disappointment was a one-point overtime time defeat 
agaii^t Lake Taylpr. 

Kellam also has had a disappointing start, dropping six 
of their first seven, llieir only win thiiig far this season was 
against Cox. 

The two teams met earlier this season, and the Marlins 
came away with an easy 88-78 win. Bayside big men Elton 
Gross and Jim Goffigan were the dominating factor in the 
game. The pair combined for 58 points and 31 rebounds in 
leading their team to the win. 

Gross is off to a sensational start.- The 6'5" senior is 
averaging 25.8 points per game and three times this 
season has hit for over 30 points. Gross is also averaging 
15 rebounds per game. Goffigan is averaghig 21.9 points a 
contest and pulls down an average of just over 10 rebounds 
a game. 

Kellam 's leading scorer has been forward Gyy 
Woodhouse. The 6'3" junior has hit for double figures Urt 
every game except the Knights opener. Sophomore Brian 



tSStem 



Macon has been coming on of late, hitting for 3? pdnts in 
his last two contests. Sonny Blackmon has also be«t a solid 
performer in a reserve role. Blackmwi scored 19 points 
coming off the bench in Kellam 's loss to Booker T. 
Washingtm last Friday, 

The Knights have not had problons ^offensively 
this season, but defense has been a different story^ 
Opponents have scored better than 75 points a game 
against the sometimes defenseless Knights. A lack of a 
strong rebounder is the major reason for this weakness. 



CoxBtFb^tCiklplllll ^ 

First ColonialAvill be trying to continue their flne early 
. season play while Cox is trying to reverse a (fewnwSrd 
trend. 

The Patriots have been the biggest surprise of Beach 



high school basketball. First Cdonial has raced to a 4^1 
start. Guard Speedy Gainer has been the major catalyst 
behind the Patriot uprising. The 5'9H" junior leads his 
club in scoring and assists. 

The only disappointmait for the Patriots has b«en the 
(flay of senior Bert Leviis. Forced to sit out last year, 
Lewis has yet to live up to the promise he showed his 
sophomore year. Coach Httl feels Lewis is about ready to 
break out of his slump. "Lewis is shooting much better in 
pfsctict." 

Guard Cleveland Sp^man has been inserted into the 
starting line-up in an effort to perk up the First Colonial 
offense. Spellman has had some great shooting nights 
Coming off the bench. In the Patriot come-from-behind 
win over Bayside, Spellman hit six straight shots in the 
fourth quarter. 

Cox has managed only one win in eight attempts that a 
one-point overtime win over Great Bridge. The Falcons 
have an 04 city record. Randy Robinson has been a 
consistent performer in defeat leading the Falcon scoring 



in every game thus far. Cox needs a more taUnced 
scoring effort to become competitive. 
Hie teams met earlier, and First Colonial won with 

Galnnr havtaig a big night. Unless the Falcons make a 
remarkable turnabout, the result should be the 'same. 

Princess Anne at Lake TSylor 

This is tiie only game Friday night where a Beach team 
is facing outside onwsltion. 

Princess Anne Is the hottest team In the city now having 
won„their last four. The Cavaliers only Ion this seasm 
was a fburTpoUit setback to Bayside. Lake Taylor started 
strong but had lost two in a row before their one-point win 
over Bayside Friday. The Titans have been forced to go 
without star Tommy Graves who is sidelined with a back 
injury. 

Forwards John Paden and George Purdln have led the 
Cavaliers throu^out thi seasdih. The pair combine for 
nearly 40 points a game and both have hit on SO per cent of 
their field goal attempts. 

Defense is where the Cavaliers have excelled this year. 
For seven games, opponents have averaged only 58.7 
points per game. Coach Leo Anthony has had great suc- 
cess with a full court press in recent weeks. 

Princess Anne will have to make up for a lack of 
rebounding strength with accurate shooting against the 
taller litans. 

KEMP8V1LLE Is Idle Friday night. 

llMsday's gamn finds Cox at Kempsville, First 
ColMilal hosUnig Granby, Kellam travelling to Norvlwir 
and Princess Anne at Booker T. Washington. Bayside has 
an opeo date Tuesday, 



„ ■ .'i 



Cavaliers are lone local victor 



Fdlcont win 22-21 



Kempsville falls short in near upset 



Friday night's high school 
basketball action found Prin- 
cess Anne gaining the only 
Virginia Beach victory. The 
Cavaliers dumped city rival 
Cox for the second time this 
season 61-54. Bayside opened 
their Eastern District season on 
a sour note with a 72-71 over- 
time loss to Lake Taylor. Willie 
Brey's Kellam ballclub lost 
their fourth straight, falling to 
Booker T. Washington 90-66. 

Princess Anne 61 Cox 54 

The second time around 
proved to be a lot closer, but the 
scoret>oard still told the same 
story. 

Two weeks earlier Cox 
travelled to Princess Anne and 
was soundly beaten by 25 points. 
On their homecourt the Falcons 
kept matters much closer, but 
' still went down for the eighth 
time in nine starts. The 
Cavaliers sre now 6-1. 

George Purdin and John 
Paden again led the Princess 
Anne scoring parade. Hitting 
from outside Cox's zone, Purdin 
led the Cavalier scoring effort 
<%rith 22 points. Teammate 
Purdin chipped in with 19 
points. 

' Falcon Randy Robinson 
continued his torrid scoring 
paceliittmg for a game-high 23 
points. Robinson's lowest point 
total in any game this year has 
been 16 points. Perry Hill, with 
12 points, was the only other 
Falcon to hit for double figures. 

The Cavaliers erased an early 
Cox lead with a second quarter 
charge. Slow-starting Princess 
Anne outscored the Falcons by 
Ave in the second quarter to 
take a 30-27 intermission lead. 

Once again it was the third 
quarter that plagued the Falcon 
effort. Princess Anne built an 
insurmoiuitable U-point lead 
while the Cox was managing a 
scant 10 points over the eight 
minute span. 

The setback brought the 
Falcons short-lived one-game 
winning streak to an end. 

Tuesday night Princess Anne 
travelled to Granby while Cox 
was at Maury. 

. Lake Taylor 72 Bayside 71 

Bayside forward Jim Gof- 
figan missed only one foul shot 
the entire game, but that one 
miss cost the Marlins a chance 
at victory. 

■ With only one second 
remaining in the overtime 
period, the 6'4" forward was 
fouled. Goffigan hit the first of 
two free throws to pull Bayside 
within one point at 72-71. His 
second attempt, which would 
have sent the game into double 
over time, hung on the rim 
before falling off ending the 



Marlin's chances. 

Bayside lost the game at the 
foul line hitting a miserable 15 
of 29 free throws. Elton Gross 
was the game's high scorer 
with 34 points, but he hit only 4 
of 12 free throws. 

The Marlins, behind the 
scoring of Gross, took command 
of the contest in the middle 
quarters. The Titans had moved 
to a four-point lead at the end of 
the first quarter, but the 
combination of some hot Marlin 
shooting and cold Lake Taylor 
efforts erased the deficit. Lake 
Taylor was outscored 38-26 over 
the middle 16 minutes of play. 

Lake Taylor caught the 
Marlins down the stretch behind 
the shooting of George Lewis 
and Willie Harper. Lewis and 
Harper combined for 36 points, 
but it was guard Ricky Barden 
who played the hero role for the 
Titans. Barden scored six of his 
ten points in the three minute 
overtime, hitting four free 
throws and a field goal. Bar- 
den's field goal was the last of 
the game and gave Lake Taylor 
a lead they never relinguished 

The Titans had entered the 
game holding a two-game losing 
sb-eak and were forced to go 
without the services of star 
Tommy Qraves. Bayside was 
coming off three straight 
successful performances. Free 
throws that didn't drop 
reversed the trends for both 
teams. Bayside is now 5-3. 

Bayside hosted Booker T. 
Washington Tuesday night. 

BookerT.Washington 90 
Kellam66 

Booker T. Washington 
unleashed an awesome second 
quarter attack and rolled to 
their first victory of the season 
90-66. For Kellam, it was their 
fourth straight loss, dropping 
their seasonal mark to 1-6. 

The Bookers have been an 
early season disappointnient in 
dropping their first five starts, 
but they finally played up to 
their potential Friday night. 
Booker- T. Washington, scoring 
almost at will, broke open a 
close contest witt a 30-point 
second quarter explosion. 
Kellam, who had trailed by only 
two at the end of the first 
quarter, suddenly found 
themsevles behind «-33 at half- 
time. 



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VIRGINIA BEACH 

4251776 




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.:• The Knights couldn't cut hito 
the Bookers lead in the final 
half. Reserve forward Sonny 
Blackmon was one of the few 
Kellam bright spots, hitting for 
a team high 19 points. 
Sophomore Brian Macon 
continued his improved scoring 



output for Kellam with a 16- 
point performance. Gary 

Woodhouse with 17 points, was 
the other Knight to hit for 
double figures. 

Kellam was at Oscar Smith 
Tuesday night. 



PRINCESS ANNE 61 
G FT 



Purdin 

Paden 

Callan 

Zinno 

Daily 

Santa 

Gruber 

Pate 

Manuel 

Tucker 



9 
8 
4 


3 

3 





4-4 
3-4 
0-0 
0-0 
0-0 
0-1 
0-1 
6-2 
6-0 
0-0 



27 7 ~12 



T 

22 

19 
8 


6 

6 



61 



COX 54 

Robinson 

Richards 

Reich 

Allen 

Hill 

Addison 

Bourdon 



G 
10 

3 
3 
2 
5 

1 
22 



FT 
3-7 

0-0 
1-2 
0-1 
2-2 
0-0 
0-0 
6-12 



T 
23 

6 
7 
4 

12 

2 

54 



Co;< 

P.Anne., 



- ^ 
..14 13 10 17-54 
.12 18 18 13-61 



BAYSIDE 71 






LAKE TAYLOR 72 






G 


FT 


T 




G 


FT 


1 


Goffigan 


7 


3-4 


17 


Harper 


7 


1-2 


15 


Fletcher 





2-2 


2 


La^is 


8 


5-9 


21 


Harold 





0-0 





Barden 


3 


4-4 


10 






. 




Trowell 


8 


0-0 


16 


Gross 


15 


4-12 


34 


Patterson 


1 


1-2 


3 


Coles 


2 


2-2 


6 


Johnson 


2 


1-3 


5 


Osborne 
Duh* ■ " 


1 
3 


4-7 
0-2 • 


6 

6 


Baker 
Etherdge 


1 



0-0 
0-1 


2 




Foskey 





0-0 





Fields 


n 


0-0 





Haynes 


u 

28 


0-0 
15-29 


ti 
71 




30 


12-21 


72 






Bayside.. 


13 22 16 20-71 












L.Taylor 17 13 13 29-72 









Saturday nights wrestling 
action had all six Virginia 
Beach high schools scheduled, 
but only two local teams 
emei^ed with wins in their dual 
matches. Cox squeezed by 
Kempsville 22-21 to remain 
undefeated. Kellam routed 
Bayside 37-15. First Colonial fell 
to Lake Taylor 39-15, and 
Princess Anne's bid to upset 
Norview fell short 25-23. 



The Cox-Kempsville match 
was the highlight of the night's 
wrestling card. Upstart 
Kempsville stayed right with 
the two-time state champion 
Falcons up until the next to last 
match of the evenhig before 
losing. 

The score stood at 16-15 favor 
of the Falcons when Jim 
Gaudreau met Kyle O'Niel. Cox 
needed a pin to clinch the match 
and state champion Gaudreau 
delivered one at 2:35. The pin 
kept Cox's record of never 
losing to a Vhrginla Beach 
school intact. 

I^e Chiefs Mark Rimarski 
pinned Falcon heavyweight Bob 
Stubbs„«t 4:38 to accoimt for the 
final 22-21 score. 

Cox's defending state champs 
Gaudreau, Chris Conkwright 
and Mike Newbem performed 
up to expectations. All three 
wrestlers scored easy victories 



to remain undefeated on the 
year with eight straight wins. 
The Falcons are now 5-0 on the 
year Kempsville suffered their 
first defeat of the year as their 
record dropped to 2-1-2. 

The match was not without 
its surprises. Chief Ken 
Buriace upset Cox's Peter Drew, 
and Dwight McGraw up«ided 
KempsviUe's highly regarded 
Frank Welidi in a l55j)ound 
match-up. 



KELLAM'S FOOTBALL 

team came to the rescue of the 
Knight wrestling squad 
Saturday In their match against 
Bayside. Football players Gene 
Bunn and George Irby wrestled 
for the fh-st time this year, and 
their efforts put two matches in 
the Knight win column. Bunn 
was impressive in his 155-pound 
debut pinning Ken Gaut at 3:0L 
Charlie Skipper remained hot 
after his tournament victory at 
the Kellam Invitational 
defeating Brian Johnson 10-S. 

Aldolphus Haynes registered 
the biggest upset of the match. 
Haynes reversed an earlier loss 
to the Marlins Dave Cash with a 
6-5 decision in a 145-pound duel. 
Kellam evened their record at 2- 
2 while Bayside dropped under 
the .500 mark for the first time 
this year. The Marlins are now 
2-3. 



FIRST COLONIAL Coach 
Chuck Forehand should have 
stayed In bed Saturday. Three 
Patriot wrestlers couldn't miike 
their weight forcing forfeits 
while Forehand's 105-pound 
wrestler broke his wrist during 
his match. 

First Colonial, after forfeiting 
matches at 112, 119 and 126 
pounds, found themselves 
trailing 24-3 and facing the 
prrapect of having to take all d 
the remaining matches to win. 
The best the Patriots could do 
against Lake Taylor was a split 
In dropping their third match in 
five outings. 

First Colonial's Freeman 
Gregg kept his unblemished 
record intact with a 4-2 win in 
the 138-pound division. 

PRINCESS ANNE saw their 
hopes of an upset fade as 
Norview won the last four 
matches of the night. 

The Cavaliers had moved into 
a comfortable lead with a four- 
match winning streak of their 
own, but for the second straight 
dual match saw that marghi 
disappear Ui^yie iipper-welghts 
Princess Anne is now 2-2 on the 
yesr. 

The Cavaliers 98-pound 
champ Ken NowUn won hlA 
seventh straight match of the\ 
season with a pin at 2:MJ 
Nowlln has yet to lose this year. 



LatwTiylorl*, 
Pint Cclenlal II 

i 

9l-T«vlor (FCI d, RHnleli, *t 
lOS-Frttdmm (LT) d, Boitrd bydtfaull 
111— Kllchtn (LT) won by ferttll 
n*-Luptl|ii <LTI wen by iorttll 
lJ»-P«fy (LT) won by torltit 
111— Minium (LT) d. Moort, 30 
lU-Grtgg (FC) d. Pilykult, 41 
)4S-'E«gai (LT) d. Smltb, 13 
llS-VauaXn (LT) d. Pontti, * I 
1»-Holcom (FC) d. LDcty, Wi 
US-Oogottt (FC) p. Marlin, 3:M 
UNL-Oral (LT) p. Ftlton, l:3« 

Kallam 11, tayHdt It 

M- Cha»« (K) d. Sawyar, »I 
)OS~FlKhtr IK) d. Hutchlnl, t2 
lU-C BruM (K) d. COOlman, 143 
n9-Haddox (B) won by tarfalt 
136-Ballou (B) p. Jtffordi, \ it 
l3J-GaUop (B) d. Tillman, 7 
t3l-Aklni (Kid. DOIMtt, 6 
145-HaynM (K) d. Caih, (5 
MS- Bunn (K) p. Oaul, 3:01 
l(7-C. Bruio (K) p. Ouarnty, I:1S 
1IS-Sklpp<r (K) d. Johnaon, 101 
UNL-lrby (Kl p Davaria, 1:41 

Norviaw 11, Princaii Anna II 

n-Nowlln (PA) p. BreolM, 1:13 , 
IOS~Howla (N) d. Krati,!S.4 
lll-Paga (N) p, Dulka, 1:44 
n»- Black (PA) d Holmaa, «4 
lia-Olcklnion (PA) d. Blackwall, »-9 
I37-B»n|umaa (PA) d. Harrall, 144 
I3«-Cu«ct»lni (PA) d. Clalrborna, fs 
l4S-Rogari (PA) d. Cillla, *i 
IM-Farguion (N) d. VOflar, 71 
ia7-Banial (N) d. Pata, 101 
)U~Falharly (N) p. Rubia, 3:11 
UNL-HOUM (N) d .lonat, 10 3 

Can 11, Kamptvllla 1) 

W- jackton (K) d. Baltallo, 10 
)OS~C Yarkai (C) d. Mayart, (I 
ni-Oufganui (K) d. Oavidaon, I07 
n9-Falthauian (C) d. Wtrnack, 41 
lia-Conkwrloht (C) d. Cata, 7 3 
l31~Storay (K) d. R. varkaa, H 
llt-Burlaca (K) d. Draw, 4 1 
US-Nawbarn (C) d. OrandataH, IS-l 
ISJ -McGraw (C) d, Walch, 7 1 
I«-Jordan(K) d. Slough, 10 3 
IIS-Gaudraau (C) p. Onlal, 3:1S 
UNL-Rlmartkl (K) p. Slubba, 4:11 



KELLAM 66 
G 
Woodhous 
Blackmon 
Macon 
Folsom 
Hughes 
Perkins 
Redus 
Mills 



BOOKER T. WASHINGTON 90 



8 
7 
6 
3 
1 
1 
1 

27 



FT 
1-2 
5-7 
4-5 
1-2 
1-2 
0-0 
0-0 
0-0 
12-18 



T 
17 

9 
16 

7 

3 
-2 

2 



66 



Deolatch 

Meektns 

Warren 

Carter 

Evans 

J. Wllnts 

Young 

M. Wilms 

Eure 

Peoples 



6 
4 
6 
6 
8 
2 
2 
2 
1 

37 



FT 
2-4 
3-4 
4-6 
3-4 
2-2 
1-3 
1-1 
0-2 
0-0 
0-0 
16-24 



T 

14 

11 

16 

15 

18 

5 

5 

4 

2 



90 



Kellam 

B.T. Wash., 



.17 16 16 17-66 
.19 30 19 22-90 



NOTICE TO THE PUSLIC 



Notice is hereby given to the public that Vii^inia Electric 
and Power Company has applied to the State Corporation 
Commission for authority to amend its Pruchased GAS 
Adjustment Factor. Its present adjustment factor provides 
for automatic increases or decreases in charges to gas 
customers because of changes in wholesale costs of gas 
purchased from pipelines. The presoit increases or 
decreases in the wholesale cost of pipeline gas passed on to 
the Company's customet^ through the adjustment factor are 
changes that are approved by the Federal Power Corti- 
mission which has jijurisdiction over the interstate sale of 
pipdine gas. Under the terms of the revised adjustment 
factor, the Company will be authorized to pass on to its 
customers, in addition to pipeline cost changes, the cost of 
supplemaital sources of gas, including, but not limited to, 
liquefied natural gas ( LNG ) , liquefied petroleum gas ( LPG ) , 
and other hydrocarbons distributed to customers or used as 
feedstock for substitute natural gas (SNG). Ilie cost to the 
Company of the supplemental sources of gas will not be 
regulat^. 

In Case No. 19173, after notice to the public and a public 
hearing, the Commission determined that all gas utilities 
should be authorize to seek and devek>p supi^emental < 
sources of gas because of the pmeit gas shortage which 
prevails throughout the nation. The Commission further 
determined that the gas utilities shotild be allowed to file 
revised adjustment factors whidi include the cost of sup- 
plemental sources of gas. 

Virginia Electric and Power Company has be«i authorized 
to place the revised adjustment factor into effect for gas 
service rendered on and after January 1 , 1974. llie revision is 
subject to further investigation, upon motion (A the Com- 
misskn, or iqmn motion of any int««8ted party for good 
cause, if siKh ob^tion is filed in writing with the Com- 
misskm on or b^ore Frf)ruary 4, 1974. 

The anriicatkm and a cof^ of tite revtoed adjiatment 
factor is available for review in all bininess offices of the 
Company where bills may be paid within the territory in 
whi(A it provides gas service and m the offices of the State 
Cbrporation Commission, Richmond, Vtifinla. Any in- 
tonated member of the public wiAlag to object to amvovid 
of the revised adjiatment factor diould inform the Com- 
mission of such objectton, in writii^, addrened to WiUam C. 
Yotng, Clwk, State Corporation Commission, P.O. Box 1107, 
Richmond, Virginia 23209, and a copy should be sent to Guy , 
T, Tripp, III, counsel for the Company, P.O. Box 15», Ridi- 
mond, Virginia 2^12. Anyone wishing to be heard orally by 
the Commission ^lould so indicate in the writtai notice. 



'VIRGINIA ELECmiC AND POWER C»MPAN¥' 

Robt. S. Gay 

lUUa k Cmtracu 

Vcpoo 

7th k FranUin Su. 

Rktawnd2»14 



Canyou afiford 

toeam 
7M% interest? 




We're obviously riot . 
trying to talk you out of our own 
7W% savings certificate. 

We'd just like you to umkEsiand 
what getting that kind of interest involves. 
Because for one thing, it involves a 
miniipum of a thousand dollars. 
And for another, it involves leaving the diousand 
dollars with us for at least 4 years. 

So before you make any decisions about how to save money, or commit 
yourself to any specific kind of acojunt, come in and see us. 

If you're saving for things like your retirement, your second grader's 
college education, or just because you have a lot of money, you're absolutely right 
to consider a time deposit account. 

If you're saving for your spring wardrobe, on the other hand, you could 
lose money diat way. And we'd like l» talk to you about 
alternatives diat would make more sense. 

We won't ckny we're as interested in opening new 
savings accounts as any bank in Virginia. 

But we wouU like to make sure you gain as much 
from an aax)unt widi us, as we do. 

You see,"Don't face it alone^isn't just a button we wear 
It's a re^nsibility, tod. ' 




Ftdnal law and rfgulaiiora probbil tbf wichdrawal of » riiw dcfMil poor lo iwmmcy unl™ the imctmi on ihf Jimwm »,ilulrj«n i. ri-Jund eo rlw 

Unileil VirniniM Bank S».-abt«in» NalUmal. Mcmhcr F I) I.C. 



m 



•^ - 



mmtmmm 



Mi 



^^mmt- 



Pa^ 6~The Sun— Wednesday, January 9, 1974 



sun DIAL 



l-ifcStylcs 



BF{ID@§ 



Library's 'talking books [program looking for funds 







i 



ALTHOUGH BLIND since birth. Mary Ann 
KilmiirraVs handicap doesn't prevent tier 
from being employed at tlie Bayside public 
library as a library assistant. Mary Anji files 
bv braille and transcribes the library 
newsletter into braille for the library's 
handicapped patrons. (Sun photo by Linda 
Miller) 



By LINDA MILLER 
Son SUff Writer 

Everything from "Gone With the Wind" 
and The Great Gatsby" to Playboy or U. S. 
News and World Report — they're all 
available in braiUe and on special records 
or tapes at the Bayside Public Librairy. ' 
The boolcs aren't for everyone, however. 
They're a part of a special service for blind 
and i^ysically handica[^ped pera^u. 

The booli service, begun by ttie Library 
of Congress several years ago, opened up 
not only a whole new world for area blind 
and handicapped library patrons, but it 
opened a door in Virginia Beach for jobs 
for the handicaiq>ed in helping run their 
own library service. Threfe full-time 
employes, two totally blind and one 
{diysically handicapped, now aid the 
Bayside Liln-ary D^rtment Coordinator 
for Handicapped Services, Marilyn 
Mortenson. And though the books and 
service itself are free through the fe<teral 
government, the necessary staff — these 
three jobs for handicapped persons — 
must now receive fuifds from the city if the 
library system wants to Iceep up with the 
demand for boolts. Each employe receives 
$4,260 per year. 

WHEN THE program for "talking 
books," as the books on records and 
cassettes are known, began through the 
Library of Congress, the Bayside library, 
as the Virginia Beach branch of the 
regional. service,was swamped with 
requests from area residents. Besides 
serving residents of this city, the library 
also serves the state's entire planning 
district 20. 

With increased demand for service, the 
library employed three handicapped 
persons to meet the needs of the han- 
dicapped patrons. 

The project was originally funded by a 
state grant supplemented by emergency 



funds from the city council. Those funchi 
run out in June and the Bayside branch's 
handicapped employes must wait to see if 
city council will apfunve an incrrased 
library budget to allow the library system 
to maintain their positions. 

The 1 ibrary system hopes to include 
salaries for the employe^ in the regular 
library budget Whiltkoking elsewhere for 
additional funds. 

"OUR BIGGES'T^noblem is space and 

the funds," says ft^ry Ami Kilmurray, a 
handica|j^i)ed emfdoyee. Mary Ann, who 
has been blind since Idrth, was a regular 
library patron when the job opening on the 
Bayside staff occurred. She is a library 
assistant and does filing by braille, (tlie 
entire "talking book" system is coded in 
braiDe, as well as by title.) She also 
brailles the library newsletter which goes 
out to patrons of the handicapped service. 
Mary Ann and co-worker Kevip 
Slominski both see a need for more 
"Christian literature" in the "talking 
books". Tljey say books like "TTie Cross 
and the Switchblade" and "Je^ and our 
Human Needs" are so popular thpy never 
reach the filing shelves, l)utare mailed out 
as soon as they are returned. Kevin, a 
victim of a motorcycle wreck, works from 
a wheelchair. He helps with the fiUng, 
checks the phonographs and cassettes for 
damage \^en they are returned and does 
simple repair work on the machines. He 
also reads cards almid to be transcribed 
into braille I,' 

COORDINATOR FOR Project Main- 
stream, as the handicapped employment 
program is called, Linda Midgett is also 
totaUy blind. She helps teach other han- 
dicapped personnel the workings of the 
department. It was her job to set up the 
files for the service and to coordinate the 
volunteer services. 

Neither Kevin 'lAor Mary Ann know 
exactly where they will go if the city does 



not budget money for their jabt. (Linda 
was unavailable for OHnment.) 

Presently, there are nuve than 6S0 
handicapped library patrons in the area. 
Most patrons receive bock selections by 
maU. All "talking books" as well as books 
in braille are mailed postage free to 
authorized parsons. PjbonoipaiAs and 
cassette j^yers are also provided on g^ 
free loan basis. The service is available to 
anyone certifled with a vinial or {diysical 
handicap. (A person does not have to be 
legally blind, and he may be airthorized to 
recrive bo<du on a tempwary basis while 
recovering from an illness or operatic^ 
which keeps him from reading regular 
books.) Atrthorization forms may be ob- 
tained dirough the library. 

THE BAYSIDE Ubrary also has 
several magnl%iiig master lenses to aid 
persons with smaller print and automatic 
page turners for persons who cannot turn 
the pages of a book due to some handicap. 
With more than 2,000 "talking books," 
cassettes, large print and braille books in 
circulation now, the entire handicapped 
services department for the area is housed 
in a small back room at the Bayside 
Ubraiy. The cramped conditions may be 
rdieved when the construction of the 
Bayside expansion, ahready approved by 
the city council, is completed sometime 
this year. (Though preliminary blueprints 
have been approved, the construction has 
not begun.) 

Once the departmoit gets more space, 
orders from the Library of Congress 
may^ be increased to increase chrculation, 
if there is the staff to adequately maintain 
the service. 

"We hope to really expand the service I 
and to employ even more handicapped 
workers," says library director Edwin S. ' 
"Sam" Clay. "It will depend upon the ' 
growth of the circulation and if we get the 
Ainds we need." 




KEVIN SLOMINSKI has been conffaied to a 
wheelchair since a motorcycle wrecic. He 
works at the Bayside public library helping 
with filing and doing simple repair Jobs on the 
phonographs and cassettes used in the 
"talking books" program. He also reads 
library cards to be transcribed into braille. 
(Sun photo by Linda Miller) 



lo 




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Pleasant neighboriiood 
career, car required, sales 
and' community background 
helpful, will train. CALL 
NOW for more information 
340-1234 or 340-213t7 

Marilyn Mitchell 
Field Manager 





428-8500 



VIRCmi;^ BEACH — 2407 Pacir rc kit. 

Telephone Answering Sendee Co. 



i i iMT ii'**?'! :!i> ^ i'!yi i ;:;>w;;ii*'*!!iy: 



HELLO.. 

I'm Eleanor Sasser, of 
Sasser 's Beauty Salon. 
Did you know . . . 

WILLDOmWDERSPORYDU ' 



FOR THE FUTURE 

SENIOR CITIZENS are in- 
vited to participate in a con- 
sumer education program 
starting today at the CeUir 
Theatre of the City Arena in 
Norfolk. Programs will be held 
on the second Wednesday of 
each month at 1:30 p.m. All 
area senior citizens are invited 
to attend. 

AN ENVIRONMENTAL 
meeting on soil, water and land 
(tevelopment proUems in the 
Tidewater area will be held at 
Christopho' Newport Collie, 
Newport News, Thursday from 
9:30a.m to 4:30 p.m. The forum, 
which is free to the public, is 
designed toacquaint elected and 
appointed offlcials, planners, 
landowners and developers with 
environmental aspects of ur- 
banization. 

A DANCE and pool party for 
teens 13 to 18 will be held at the 
W. W. Houston Boys' Qub, 3401 
Azalea Gat-den Road, Norfolk, 
Friday from 7 p.m. to midnight. 
Tlie dance is sponsored- by the 
Boys' Oub Keystone Club and 
the Norfolk Girls' Club Teen 
Club. The swimming poo) will 
be open from 7 to 9 p.m. Tickets 
are $1.50 at the door. Additional 



information may be obtained by 
calling 855-8908 or 855-5680. 

FLOWER ARRANGING will 
be taught in a six'\wek ggurse 
bei^ii« Vlpn^y ii^era^by^ 
the city schooV distrflffitlve . 
education service. Wayne Jones 
of Flowers-Wayne Jones will 
teach the course at Princess 
Anne High School Mondays 
from 7:30 to 10 p.m. Course cost 
is $22.50. Additional information 
may be obtained from the 
schools' distributive education 
service at 427-4151. 



FOR THE RECORD 

FOOP BASKETS for 123 

needy Virginia Beach families 
were delivered by the Bayside 
Lions Club during the holiday 
season. Canned goods for the 
baskets were accumulated 
during the recent Living 
Christmas Tree performance of 
Virginia Beach Girl Scouts, 
sponsored by the Bayside Lions. 
In addition, public school 
students collected canned goods 
for the project Sun Oil Company 
donated a building on 9iore 
Drive where Lions Club 
mc.nbers assembled the 
baskets. The club donated one 
canned ham for each basket.' 



iNotiiJng lifts the spiritt 
f quite Uke a becoming 
tak (tyle: Soft, silky 
cwis md heathy glowing 
hail. It's part of the nat- 
ani look. Fed toUlly 
feminine. 



ORIENTALARTS & CURIOS 

HOURS: 10 LOS. TO 5:00 pja. 
CLOSED SUN. k MON. 



Redken 

Scoulf CortProducti 




. A NEW FLAG and flagpole 
assembly were dedicated 
Sunday at First Colonial Baptist 
Church, 929 First Colonial 
Road. The Rev. (George 
l^^lingE, pastor ,q( the ctakc|| 
RSte^gned the n^ church flag 
yihuAi will fly under the United 
States flag. "Jesus Saves" and 
"Tlie Lord Thy God Healeth 
Thee" are messages on the 
flagpole assembly. 

DECORATED DOORWAYS 

v/eee awarded prizes by the 
King's Forest Garden Qub 
recently when they judged 
holiday decorations in King's 
Forest. Award winners, in 
order, are Cmdr. and Mrs. H. 
Daley, Mr. and Mrs. Vincoit G. 
Gepp and Mr. and Mrs. J. W. 
Crook. Club m«nbers and dteir 
husbands attended the annual 
C^hristmas party at the home of 
Capt. and Mrs. Burton Witnam. 
Members also donated b 
Christmai^ ^ree and decorations 
to the Holidays Home for the 
Aged. 



CHRISTMAS STOCKINGS 

for children at the Seatack 
Community Center were stuffed 
with toys by membo-s of Cub 
Scout Pack 391. At the pack's 
recent meeting, Scott Stallcup, 
Glen Smith and Greg Gilliam 
were awarded the Arrow of 
Light and welcomed into Boy 
Scout Troop 391. Awards were 
pr^oited and top salesmen- of 
safety flares were announced. 

lUms may be mbmitted to 
Sun Dial by malL Pkax mail your 
notice to Sun Dial, Virginia Beach 
Sun, 138 Roiemont Road. Vir- 
ginia Beach, Va. 2345Z Deadline 
l! noon Friday prior to the week 
of publication. 




Mrs. Brindel 

Brindel-Page 

Donna Kathleen Page was 
wed to Lt. Glenn Richard 
Brindel Dec. 29 at Rock Church. 

The bride is the daughter of 
Mr. and Mrs. A. H. Page Jr. of 
Virginia Beach. The 
bridegroom is the son of Mr. 
and Mrs. L. Guy Brindel of 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Mrs. Jeanette Siawn was 
matron of honor. Bridesmaids 
were Jackie Longworth, Pat 
Blakely was Faye BowersiShen 
Broadaway was flower girl. 

Mike GiDigan was best man. 
Ushers were Bob Wilson, Asa 
Page and George Brindel. 

The couple will reside in 
Virginia Beach. 

McMath-Gietz 

Nancy Ann Gim became the 
bride of Donald Randolf 
McMath Saturday at First 
Presbyterian Church. 

The bride is the daughto* of 
Mr. and Mrs. William Albol 
Gietz of Virginia Beach. The 
bridegroom is the son of John 
Sylvester McMath of Cape 



I Our talented staff of li- 

I Gcnied and experienced 
Halt Stylists wUI help 
you look and feel lovely. 
Th^ will cut, style, set 
or ctrfor. Pamper your- 

|ietf! Call foi an appoint- 

■■leBt now. 



Barron H. Stillman, AA.D. 



Takes pleasure in announcing 
The Association of 



Chu Hon Yi, AA.D. 



for the practice of 
Internal Medicine and Cardiology 



Phone 
4814167 



Houfiby 
Appointment 






Ct I U\C\ 1*1 



Mrs. McMath 

Uiarles and the late Mrs. 
McMath. 

Mrs. Judy Iiunan was matron 
of honor. Bridesmaids were 
Perry Elizabeth %elly and 
Mrs. Linda Lawler. 

John Russell Parsons was 
best man. U^ers were William 
Albert Gietz Jr. and Claude F. 
Jones. 

* The couple will reside in 
Richmond. 

Scott-Jernigan 

Haygood United Methodist 
Oiurch was the setting for the 
Dec. 29 marriage of Myra Jane 
Jemigan and Malvin Gordon 
Scott III. 

r The bride is the daughter of 
Mr. James Franklin Jemigan of 
Vii^inia Beach and the late Mr. 
Jerpigan. The bridegroom is the 
son of Mr. and Mrs. M. Gordon 
Scott of Newport News. 

Dianne Warwick was maid of 
honor. Brfctesmaids wa% Mrs. 
Gregory Sutton, Jan Scott and 
Sue White. Wendy Knicker- 
bocker was flower girl and Scott 
Watterson was ring bearer. 

Mah»)lm Willoughby was best 
than. Ushers were Steve 
Giveis, Francis G. Griffin Jr. 
and Donald Tomlinsc^. 

llie couple will reside in 
Newport News. 

Jones-Walker 

Kathy Lynn Walker and 
Larry Michael Jones were wed 
Ftltlay at the Chapel of the 
t&od Shepherd, Naval Air 
Station Oceana. 
'Hie Mde is the daughter of 
Masto- Qiief and Mrs. Robert 
J. Walker of Virginia Beach. 
Tlie Inidegroom is the wn of 
Mr. and Mrs. Mer«)iUi Jones of 
MaroigOt Ind. 

Linda Falato was h«- sister's 



Mrs. Scott 

mt^tron of honor. Bridesmaids 
were Teri Ann Walker, Linda 
Williams and Judy Riley. Traci 
Riley was flower girl. 

Bruce Jones was his brother's 
best man. Ushers were Robert 
Walker Jr., Qyde Hopkins, 
David Slewart and Larry 
Williams. 

The couple will reside in 
Virginia Beach. 

Births 



Mr. and Mrs. Douglas Ray 
Arden, Son. 

Mr. and Mrs. Harold John 
Schlosser, Daughter. 

Mr. and AArs. Richard Henry 
Miller, Son. 

Mr. and AArs. Lewis Edward 
Whedl)ce, Daughter. 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert Lee 
Simpson, Jr., Son. 

Mr. and Mrs. Frank J. 
Mikovits, Daughter. 

Mr. and AArs. Henry Shepard 
Bralthwaite, Daughter. 

Mr. and Mrs. William Randolf 
Clarke, jr., Son. 

Mr. and AArs. James Leonard 
Styron, Jr., ^n. 

Mr. and Mrs. Thorman Glenn 
Pritchard, Jr., Daughter. 

Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Frank 
Knudsen, Daughter. 

Mr. and Mrs. Jerry Lee 
Jacquin, Daughter. 

Mr. and Mrs. Floyd Lee 
Shorter, Jr., Daughter. 

Mr. and Mrj. Bobby Byron 
Batten, Sr., Son. 

Mr. and AArs. AAarc Steven 
Tefft, Son. 

Mr. and Mrs. Gregory W. 
Gurganus, Son. 

Mr. and Mrs. Walter L. Far- 
mer, Daughter. 

Mr. and Mrs. Jerry w. 
McClenney, Daughter. 

Mr. and Mrs. James A. 
Hawkins, Daughter. 

Mr. and AArs. Claudius L. Rlck- 
mers. Daughter. 

Mr. and Mrs. Stephen Smith, 
Son. 

Mr. and Mrs. David G. Cun- 
ningham, Son. 

Mr. and Mrs. Dennis Wayne 
Stephenson, Son. 



BKM n SM ONS 



Shampoo i S«t From $3.25 

Complete Permoneni Waves $6.95 to $19.95 

Roox Fonci-Tone Touch-up From $5.00 

Roux Frosting (Shantpoo i Set Extra) $12.50 

Haircut $2.75 

No AppoitUment iSecessary~Just Come In 
DAILY - 9 'til 6 THURS. - 9 'til 9 



HHItrp Pt»M Shopping Cwiter 
Lasklrl Rd. Naxt to SaMway 
PI»one:'42S-9897 
Va. Baac*^ 



51 IS Va. Beach niwd. 
AcroH from GEX 
Phone: 497-9769 
Va. Boaeh 



tt 



1734 E. 

LHtW Craak Rd. 

Naxt to Zayr« 

Pfton: 58S-9093 

Norfolk 



BIG BROTHERS 

^tcM -(31) 1973 Utfle BipUiers waitii« f« b^ 

t - oae k lai yon. CaM and place your wde» 
>42S-<M0. 



NO MAN EVER STANDS SO TALL AS WHEN HE 
SUXm TO HELP A BOY. 



SfMIELE FUNERAL HOME 



.....^«i^idi.AiMiftiUki^M«MHiiMH 



Tht Sun-WtdrMsday, Jaituary 9, 1974-Paga 7 





TO THE CITIZENS OF VIRGINIA BEACH 

NEW GARBAGE COLLECTION 



.-^1^ 



Our automotive fuel supplier has notified us that because 
•^^^^ederal government fuel allocations, the City of Virginia 
Beach will receive only 85% of the fuel necessary to carry on our 
normal public service delivery programs. Since our fleet uses 
almost 150,000 gallons per month, this creates a shortage of 
more than 20,000 gallons and requires that we make some 
serious adjustments in our operations. 

We are inaking every effort to see that pur citizens 
experience as little Inconvenience as possible due to the fuel 
shortage and to see that no essential service is severely reduced. 



Our largest gasoline and diesel fuel user is the Refuse 
Collection Division, and It is absolutely necessary that we 
reduce this consumption. We must, therefore, ask for your 
support and cooperation as we move to a "once a week 
garbage collection." 

In order to give you the best possible service under this 
restricted schedule, we will have a scheduled "trash and junk" 
coUection (old furniture and appliances, etc.) on your route on 
the same day that your household garbage Is collected. 

With the exception of the specific subdivisions listed below ^, 
the following schedule will be in effect from Monday, January 
7, 1974, until further notice: 



NEW SCHEDULE 



MONDAY COLLECf ION 

ALL AREAS FORMERLY SCHEDULED 
fOR PICK-UP ON MONDAY & THURSDAY! 

♦UNLESS NOW SCHEDULED FOR TUESDAY PICK-UPr 



WEDNESDAY COLLECTION 

ALL AREAi FORMERLY SCHEDULED 
FOR PICK-UP ON WEDM$SDAY 6 SATURDAYI 

• UNLESS NOW SCHEDULED FOR TUESDAY PICK-UPI 



^TUESDAY COLLECTION 
FOR THE SUBDIVISIONS OF; 

ARAGONA VILLAGE 

PEMBROKE MEADOWS 

PEMBROKE MANOR 

PEMBROKE SHORES 

PRINCESS ANNE PLAZA 

WINDSOR WOODS 

PECAN GARDENS 

WINDSOR OAKS 

GREEN RUN 

MAGIC HOLLOW 

OLD DONATION MANOR 

OLD DONATION SHORES 

TIMBERLAKE 

LARKSPUR 
WITCHDUCK POINT 



FRIDAY COLLECTION 

ALL AREAS FORMERLY SCHEDULED 
FOR PICKUP OH TUESDAY & FRIDAY! 

* UNLESS NOW SCHEDULED FOR TUESDAY PICK-UP 



TNEkE WILL BE NO COLLECTIONS ON 
TNURSDAY & SATURDAY EXCEPT UNDER 
UNUSUAL CIRCUUSTANCESr 



It K our sincere hope that these new schedules wilt not 
result in any extreme inconvenience to any individual cHi* 
^en or business, but we realize that some hardships might 
arise. If problems or questions do arise, please contact tht 
Refuse Collection Division at 427-4201 or the city "HOT 
LINE" AT 427-41 1 1 between the hours of 9:00 A.AA. and 
5:00 P.M. Personnel will be available to answer your ques- 
tions, and if serious problems result from these new sched- 
ules, we will attempt to make the necessary adjustments to 
maintain a satisfactory service level. We must all work 
together to meet the current energy and fuel shortage. I 
know that each of you has already done certain things to 
assist in this effort, and we ask for your cooperation and 
understanding in this program change. 



mmmm 



^i^&-The Sun— Wednesday, January 9, 1974 



TKeft chargedrto school workers 



AuUHnrities say tw6 employes 
of the yUiinia Beach public 
school system have been 
charged with theft, of food in- 
tmded to be used m the public 
school lunch program." 

The accused were identified 
Daniel B. Williams, 47 »,j01d, 
Virgrnia Beach Bfvd., iand 
William M. Johnson, 67, Witch- 
duck Road. Their em. 
ployment involved delivery of 
supplies by truck to public 
schools throughout the cify. , 

Investigators said the men 
were arrested following 
discovery Thursday night of 
foodstuffs valued at $300 in Jtfr. 
WiUiams home. The items were 
still in containers which iden- 
tified Urem as being supplifefl'by 
the federal government and 



prohibited from being sold. 

The items included 96 poimds 
of butter, 50 pounds of ftour, SO 
pounds of rice, 150 pounds at 
shortening and six gallons of 
salad oil. 



Authorities said the arrests 
followed an investigation by the 
Franklin Security Systems, 
Inc., a private investigative 
firm. Billy Franklin, firrt 
operator, said the investigation 



shovrad the items were iiKliKkd 
in food shipments picked up at a 
warehouse in Norfolk and 
withheld from supplies 
distributed at the various 
schools. 



Arrests made for stolen autos 



Three men and a juvenile 
have been charged with stealing 
cars in Virginia Beach and 
Norfolk, then taking the cars tp 
Chesapeake where they were 
dismantled. 

Police identified those 
charged as Robert F. Anglin 
Jr., 19, N. Crestline Drive; 
Thomas E. Williams, 22, 
Coventry Road; Donnle 
Hankins, 19, Roland Drive, 



Norfolk; and a 16-year-old 
Virginia Beach boy. Authorities 
said each of the suspects has 
been charged in connection with 
MjMlts of two autos in Norfolk, 
wmle Mr. Anglin and Mr. 
Hankins have also been charged 
with theft of another auto in 
Virginia Beach. 

The arrests followed a raid 
Thursday night on a small 



garage on Oak Grove Road in 
Chesapeake, which was 
allegedly i-ented for the purpose 
of dismantling the cars. 

Investigators said various parts 
removed from the stolen autos 
woidd be used on other autos in 
stock car races. Remains of one 
of the stoleA cars reportedly 
were discovered outside South 
Mills, N.C. ^ 



I'/ 



il-' 



Acoustic Guitars 



^^^ 



SAVE UP TO 



50% 



BEGINNER EtECTRIC GUITAR 

"^ includes instruction Book. Guitar Bag, 3 Piclis and Cord 

Retail: 429" SALE: ^59^5 

BASS GUITAR - Retail '149« sale: »64" 

AMPLIFIERS «•« i-ov. as •49'* 
ACOUSTIC GUITAR SALE still In Progress 

Save Up To 50% 



(over one - hundred to choose from) 



Layaways 

All Charge 

Cards Accepted 



Mason Music 

853 E. LIHLE CREEK RD. 
-NORFOLK- 583-4513 




k 



^^'''pfl^d^i, ■ ^-^.' 



HELP . . . Yourself and 
- The Country 

, ,, ' -^ Ride A 

H ] Bike 

\_y From 

THE BEACH PEDALER 



fciee/ 



bf lleoi $lmi 





The attire of this flower-bedeclced 
rock music fan might have been 
suitable for attending the games 
in ancient Greece. Actually, he 



was intently listening to music 
along with thousands oi others at 
an outdoor concert last summer in 
Portsmouth. 



illS.MACDONALD 



Ms. Macdonald 
to seek election 
to council again 

Cecily Macdonald Monday 
became the second candidate to 
announce plans to run for Uie 
Virginia Beach City Council in 
the May election. 

Ms. Macdonald, 44, who ran 
unsuccessfully for council in 
1972, is a Kempsville resident, 
but is undecided whether she 
will seek the Kempsville 
Borough seat or run for one of 
two at-large seats on the 
council. She feels qualified as a 
candidate for either position 
because of her ihvolvemoit in 
civic activities and knowledge 
of city govemmoit. 

A regular member of the- 
audience at city council 
sessions, Ms. Macdonald is also 
president of the Kempsville 
Borough Assn., second vice- 
presid«)t of the Riverton Civic 
League, education chairman of 
the Council of Civic 
Organizations, a member of the 
Virginia Beach R^iwbUcan City 
committee and legislative co- 
chairman of the Woodstock 
PTA. She received the 
endorsement of the Republican 
City Committee Thursday. 

Ms. Macdonald plans to base 
her campaign on "facts" 
concerning past expenditures 
and actions of the city council. 
She is especially interested in 
seeing changes made in the 
procedure city council uses to 
hold closed sessions and favors 
financial disclosures by all 
elected officials. 

Raised, and (educated in 
Newton, Mass., Ms. Mac(k)nald 
is married and has four 
children. 



c^rn 



Bl-aaK • 



Jf^ 




./*-. 



Phone 486-7334 



?^\^^ 



4320 Va. Beach Blvd. 



ALONG 




^fo^ S 



Accent a room, Britten the 
night with a lamp or shade 
from... 



\j£amp,&Si^7naAi 




4724.VA. BEACH BIVO. 

ocroM from new J. M. Fwldt 

mN..$«T. f:JW:JB-HI. -m » ^Jl. 



We make and repair 
lamps 



I 



^TTTELEDYNE 

,„i„,„,R«CKARDBELL.| 

COLOR TV 

STEREO 
COMPONENTS 

SERVICE 
OUR SPECIALITY 

Phone 486-3311 
VIRGINIA BEACH TV INC. 

Heart of London Bridge 
2322 Virginia Beach Blvct 




Birthstone For 

January Is 

GARNET 

Large Selection Of Garnet Jewelry 

New Shipment Of High Quality 

Lapuis LazuH and Turquoise 

GEM SPECIALTIES i 

Open 10-9 MON. THRU SAT. 3320 VA. BEACH BLVDJ 
PHONE 48 6-7886 Behind The Stroud Bldg. tarn 

The 40,000 Mile Tire 

FALCON 
STEEL 

RADIAL 

Any Size 
Wfilfewo/fs 

$2.65 to $3.52 ^ Ji. A 

Fed. Excise Tax ^ H^^^ 

ONE PRICE Tire Stores 

632 Virginia Beach Blvd. Ph: 428-0352 







tJ r-'t. 




Tt^m " ■-• " 


X~~^- •■■^-■**'' 


^^^■■■^■I^H 


%^ _.iu: 


^\JAX^ 



rou drlye the Boulevard day after day, andby-pass 
the largest and oldest shopping area In Tidewater. 
These are the stores which line either side of Virginia 
Beach Boulevard.Viatch this page monthly for the 

^^~^peclal buys at these stores,,. 

your opportunity for real savlngsl 



ri« 



*V*' 



:\. 

V^^^ QXS^'^ SPECTACULAR* 

■'' Permanent Specials 
$15.00 up 

JVIr. ^U8'8 
Hafp §t.yllnfl 



'4 



3177 Va. Beach Blvd. 



Phone 340-6408 



5;:-:-;^-^ 




Upholstering 

Refinishing 

Repairing 

New & Used 

Furnittire For| 

Sale 

Hilltop Upholstering Co. 
1000 Virginia Btach BN. Ph. 428-6377 




of Virginia 
CRUISES AIRLINES TOURS 



m 




Caribbean 
Europe 



Tickets & 
Reservatioos 



1f»divldual 
or Group 



3500 Va. Beach Blvd. 
340*3403 



Hilltop North 
425-3030 



Both Offices Open Weekdays 9 a.m. - 5 p.m. 
Hilltop Offic e Open Sat. 9.30 a.m. — 1 p.m. 



FRONT END PACKAGE 




With This Coupon 

1. Install 2 famous brand 
shocks 

2. Professionally aligned front 
end 



GoodthreJiR. 31»t, 1974 



4834 Virginia Beach Blvd. 
Vir^nia Beach Phone 499-0501 




iJ^^J^S^iJW* 



ijom 



"ac 





(American 
Can) 

STORES 



fi|pQIimntri)§torF 

Monday thru Saturdays 10-S; 
Sunday 1-5 * 

2956 VIRGINIA BEACH BOULEVARD 
(Next to Pine Tree Inn) 340-6317 



^^^ 



t t^ 



Probation given in assault 



Th* Sun— Wtdrmday, January 9, 1974— Paga 9 



Michael L. Meore, «iio had 
beoi sentoiced to four years in 
irison followiilg a brawl bet- 
ween Hie basdl>all team of 
Norcom and First Coloniai high 
schools, has now been placed on 
twoyews supervised probatimi. 

Circwt Court Judge Paul W. 
Ackiss soitenced Mr. Moore In 



S^tember afta- he was con- 
victed ot malldoua aaaiMt tot 
striking a First Colohial player 
in the head with a baseball bat 
during an April game betwem 
the two schools. Judge Acldss 
delayed imposition of the 
sentence and granted probation 
followed petitions from Ports- 




Your taste 
will always ' 
come first 



BffUiUkis^ 



In many respects, patrons of Tor^erson Hall, the 
enlisted men^s dining hall at the Little Creek Naval 
Ami^iibious Base, are treated like customers at a 
commercially operated civilian cafeteria. Menus 
are based on the likes and dislikes of those who eat 
in the hall. An unmilitary atmosphere is created 
through decorations and civilian mess attendants 
are employed to serve from steam tables and clear 
tables after meals. 

Chief Warrant Officer H.J. l^hn, is the food 
service officer directly responsible for the daily 
preparation and serving of meals, and related 
activities in the operation of Torgersm Hall. 

Mr. Koehn says, "Customer preference is one of 
ttie main points considered in making up our 
menus. We invite opinions of customer likes and 
dislikes through the use of suggestion boxes." He 
added, menus are prepared in fiye-week cycles and 
reviewed each week for items which mdy-npt be 
acceptable. A study is then conducted to determine 
why the item was disliked. Perhaps the reason was 
the method of preparation of the food, or it may not 
have been compatible to other items on the menu. 

SOME OF THE favorite foods at Torgerson Hall 
include eggs for breakfast, steak, fried chicken or 
fish for lunch and creole lasagna and macaroni and 
meatballs for dinner. Mr. Koehn says some of the 
less popular foods include liver, lamb and duck. 
"As a matter of fact," he added, "I'm thinking 
about trying to remove lamb from the menu 
because it is rarely acceptable." 

Other moves to please patrons include offering 
foods such as cottage cheese which ai^al to those 
watching their diet. Special dinners honor different 
nationalities or customs. These include Italian or 
French.di*hes or maybe even "soul food." Holiday 
menu» include traditional American favorites. 

In line with recent Navy changes, a beer vending 
machine has been installed in Torgerson Hall to 
accomodate those who like beer with their meals. 
However, Mr. Koehn says, "Coffee, milk and soft 
drinks are still preferred." 

TH0s6 WHO receive subsidy and are required to 
pay for their meals are encouraged to bring their 
family and friends for meals. Those who take 
advantage of this offer will not only find the food to 
theilr liking, but a price which will please their 
budget. A man and his wife can enjoy a complete 
lunch or dinner for a tqtal cost of $2.05. Their 
children under 12 can accompany them for an 
additional charge of 65 cente each. 

Mr. koehn estimates that, depending upon the 
time of year, upwards (A 900 people are served 
daily. The largest single meal attendance is during 
lunch. This also involves the most preparation 
time, usually requiring an average of five-and-a- 
half hours and 35 people to prepare and serve the 
meal. 

The preference of some for hamburgers and soft 
drinks over complete steak dinners is of concern to 
Cmdr. J.G. Farrell, whose command includes 
operation of Torgerson Hall. He says, "One thing I 
would like to see is our patrons taking advantage of 
a full, rounded menu. It'^ amazing to see how many 
young men think they can subsist only on 
hamburgers and soft drinks." 



Federal grants to fund 
student learning centers 



College Park Elementary 
School will be able to establi^ 
student learning centers in the 
school Ubrary and in individual 
classrooms with the help of a 
$5,000 fed«-al grant recently 
awarded to the school under 
Title II of the Elementary and 
Secondary Education Act. 

The Title II funds were 
awarded for the schools' 



learning c«iter project to 
provide College Park teachers 
with a greater variety of 
teaching materials and aidi. 

Audrey Kufhal, school 
librarian, said 1,000 new books 
will \x purchased with the 
funds, as well as a number of 
films, tape recordings and other 
audio-visual materials. 



Vandals damage 59 autos 
in window-breaking spree 



The windows of 59 autos were 
shattered Saturday night In an 
hour-long wave of vandalism in 
several areas of the city. Hie 
damaige was estimated to total 
$3,000 to $5,000. 

fl Police said the incidaits were 
reported in the Lake Smith 
Terrace, Thoroughgood, 
Aragona, Lake Shores and 
Lynnhav«i Colony areas. All of 
the vandalism was reported 
betwe^ 9 p.m. and 10 p.m. 

Iny^ltgators said most of the 
windows were completely 
blattered, and all the cars in 
volved were parked on streets 
outside homes or in r^id^ce 
driveways. TTie damage ap- 
pears to have be«i caus«l by a 
high powered pellet-gun fired 
by someone driving IhrtM^h the 
area* 



Despite the large number of 
cars involved, authorities say 
they have not received reports 
from anybody who saw or heard 
anything connected with the 
incidoils. 



STUDENT ON TOUR 



Kevin Philips,- son of Mrs. 
Marian R. Philip of Virginia 
Beach, will join t|ie choir of the 
University of the South during a 
ten-day tour of Georgia and 
Florida. TTie 50- voice choir wUl 
be performii^ in a (tozoi sacred 
concerts and church sctvicts. 

The tour begins &mday from 
the University Choir's home at 
All SainM' CSiapd in Sewan^, 
T«jn. ^ 



mouth civic groups wliich 
termed the sentence as "unfair 
and unjust". 

Jik^e Ackias also told Mr. 
Moore, 18. that if he ronained 
f i^ of any involvanent with Uie 
law for two yews bis .maildous 
assault conviction probably 
would be dismissed. 

Mr. Moore had received 
numerous awards as a monber 
of the Norcom High School 
baseball team and is now at- 
tending St. Augustine's CoUe^ 
in Raleigh, N. C. , on a baseball 
scholarship. He had expressed 
concern over the effect a felony 
conviction would have on his 
remaining in college and on h'.^ 
future career in business or 
military so^ice. 

Asst. Commonwealth's Atty. 
Tuck Anderson agreed with the 
court that Mr. Moore was en- 
titled to some leniency, but he 
felt that dismissal of the con- 
viction as well as time to be 
served in prison would be " a 
travesty erf justice." 



[ 



uii^ 



J 



VIRGINIA: 

IN THE CLERK'Si OF- 
FICE OF THE CIRCUIT 
COURT OF THE CITY OF 
VIRGINIA BEACH, ON THE 
2nd DAY OF JANUARY, 
1974. 

In re: Adoption' of Klm- 

berly Ann Sutton 

By: Stephen Charles Roggy 
and Linda Marie Coir Sutton 
Roggy (Natural AAother) 

To: Charles Augustus Sutton 
3884 M. Street 
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 

IN CHANCERY 
C-73-U73 

ORDER 

This day came Stephen 
Charles Roggy and Linda 
AAarie Cole Sutton Roggy, 
Petitioners, and represented 
that the object of this 
proceeding is to effect the 
adoption of the above named 
Infant, Kimberiy Ann Sutton, 
by Stephen Charles Roggy 
and Linda Marie Cole Sutton 
Roggy, husband and wife, 
and affidavit having been 
made and filed that Charels 
Augustus Sutton, a natural 
parent of said child, is a non- 
resident of the State of 
Virginia, tt«e last known post 
office address being: 3884 M 
Street, , Philadelphia, Penn- 
sylvania. 

It is therefore Ordered ttiat 
the said Charles Augustus 
Sutton appear before this 
Court within ten (10) days 
after publication of this Orer 
and Indicate his attitude 
toward the proposed adop- 
tion, or otherwise do wtiat is 
necessary to protect his 
interest in this matter. 

A copy teste: 

John V. Fentress, Clerk 

By: J. Curtis Fruit, D.C. 

John D. Hooker, Jr. , p.q. 
3707 Virginia Beach Blvd. 
Virginia Beach, Virginia 
23452 

1.9, 16, 23, 31 -4T 

Commonwealth of Virginia, 
In the Clerk's OHice of the 
Circuit Court of the City of 
Virginia Beach, on the 2nd 
day of January, 1974 

ORDER OF 
PUBLICATION 

Annie H.» Lynch, Plaintiff. 

against 

Levi Lynch, Defendant. 

The obiect of this suit is to 
obtain a decree of divorce a 
vinculo matrimonii from the 
said defendant, upon the 
grounds of over 2 • year 
separation. 

And an affidavit having 
been made and filed that the 
defendant due diligence has 
been used by or in behalf of 
the complainant to ascertain 
in which county or cor- 
poration the defendant is, 
without effect, the last known 
post office address betng; 
Route 1, Box 7 Virginia 
Beach, Virginia. 

It is ordered that he do 
appear her within ten (10) 
days after due publication 
hereof, and do what may t>e 
necessary to protect his 
interest in this suit. 

A copy-Teste: 

J. Curtis Fruit, Clerk. 

William H. Colona, Jr., p.q. 
281 Independence Blvd. 
Virginia Beach, Virginia 

1-9,16,23,31-4T 

Comnrwnwealth of Virginia, 
In the Clerk's Office of the 
Circuit Court of the City of 
Virginia Beach, on the 2nd 
day of January, 1974. 

Benjamin George Puleo, 

Plaintiff, 

against 

Alice Faye Puleo, Defendant. 

ORDER OF 
PUBLICATION 

The ^iect of mis suit is to 
obtain a divorce a vinculo 
matrimonii from mo said 
defendant, upon the grounds 
of desertion. 

And an affidavit tiaving 
been made and filed that the 
defendant is a non-resMent of 
me State of Virginia, me last 
known post office adch^K 
being: 3249 Orange Street, 
National City, California, 
921^. 

It is ordered that she do 
appear here within tan (10) 
days after due putjiication 
hereof, and do what may be 
neceuary to protect her 
interest in this suit. 

A copy-Teste: 

J. Curtis Fruit, Clerk. 

Fine, Fine, Legum & Fine, 

PO 

720 Law Building 

N«1olK, Virginia 

19,U,a414T_ 

VIRGINIA: 

IN THE CLERK'S OF 
FICE' OF THE CIRCUIT 
COURT OF THE CITY OF 
VIRGINIA BEACH, ON THE 
2ND DAY OF JAN.. W4. 



In re: Adoption of ELAAO 
THOMAS HESSE, JR., 
an Infant under the age of 
fourtean years 

By: Randolph Howard 
Foster and Junalta Hesse 
Fatter, 

PetlHonars 
To: Elmo Thomas Hesse Sr. 
Maysvltle, west Virginia 

IN CHANCBRY 
&73;»S-A 

ORDER 

. This day came Randolph 
l^wrard Foster and Junalta 
Hesse Foster, Petitioners, 
and represented that the 
obicdof this proceeding Is to 
effect the adoption of the 
above named Infant, Elmo 
Thomas HJisse, Jr., by 
RAndotph Howard Foster 
and Juanlta Hesse Foster, 
husband and wife, and af- 
fidavit having been made 
and filed mat Elnrra Thomas 
Hesse, Sr., a natural parent 
of said child. Is a non- 
resident of the State of 
Virginia, the last known post 
office address being: 
AAayswMIe, West Virginia. 

It Is therefore Ordered that 
the said Elmo Thomas 
Hesse, Sr. appear before this 
Court withing ten (10)' days 
after publication of this 
Order and indicate his at- 
titude toward the proposed 
adoption, or otherwise do 
what Is necessary to protect 
his Interest In this matter. 

A copy teste: 

John V, Fentress, Clerk 

By: Sandra Harvove, D.C. 

Barry Kantor, p.q. 
706 Plaza One BIdg. 
Norfolk, Va. 

1-9,16,23,31-4T 



NOTICE 

Virginia: 

The regular meeting of 
the Council of the City of 
Virginia Beach will be held 
In the Council Chambers of 
the Administration 
Building, City Hall, 
Princess Anne Station, 
Virginia Beach, Virginia, 
on Monday, January 21, 
1974, at 2:00 P.M. at which 
time the following 
applications will be heard: 

CHANGE OF ZONING 
DISTRICT 
CLASSIFICATIONS: 

DEFERRED FOR 60 DAYS 
BY CITY COUNCIL ON 
NOVEMBER 19, 1973 AND 
REFERRED BACK TO 
PLANNING 
COMMISSION: 



PR I N CESS 
BOROUGH 



ANNE 



1. Petition Of R.L. 
Munier and William W. 
Robertson for a CHANGE 
OF ZONING DISTRICT 
CLASSIFICATION from A- 
1 Apartment District to 0-1 
Office District on certain 
property beginning at a 
point 1800 feet more or less 
West of South Lynnhaven 
Road, running a distance of 
543.20 feet along the North 
side of Holland Road, 
running a distance of 566.14 
feet along the Western 
property line, runnirrg a 
distance of 495.90 feet along 
the Northern property line 
and running a distance of 
790.50 feet along the 
Eastern property line. Said 
parcel contains 8 acres 
more or less. (Green Run 
Area). PRINCESS ANNE 
BOROUGH 

LYNNHAVEN BOROUGH 

2. Petition of Caritoa E. 
Seay and Laura R. Seay 
Trust for a CHANGE OF 
ZON I NG .DISTRICT 
CLASSIFICATION from R- 
5 Residential District to A-2 
Apartment District on 
certain property located at 
the Northwest intersection 
of Great Neck Road and the 
Norfolk and Southern 
Railroad Right of Way, 
running a distance of 328.02 
feet along the West side of 
Gre^ Neck Road, running 
a distance of 760 feet along 
the North side of the 
Norfolk and Southern 
Railroad Right of Way, 
running a distance of 110 
feet along the western 
property line and running a 
distance of 644.90 feet along 
the South side of the 
Virginia Beach-Norfolk 
Expressway and running a 
distance of 264.24 feet along 
the Northern property line. 
Said parcel contains 5.17 
acres. (London B.ridge 
Area). Planning 
Commission recommends 
modification to B-2 
Community fBusiness 
District. LYNNHAVEN 
BOROUGH. 

3. Petition of Donna 
Goodson by J.H. Robertson 

for a CHANGE OF 
ZONING DISTRICT 
CLASSIFICATION from R- 
8 Residential District to 0-1 
Office District on certain 
property beginning at a 
■ point 150 feet South of Gator 
Road, running a distance of 
150 feet along the West side 
of South Lynnhaven Road, 
running a distance of 327 
feet along the Southern 
property line of which 75.58 
feet is the North side of 
First Street and 251.42 feet 
Is me South side of Virginia 
Beach Norfolk Expressway 
Access Ramp, running a 
distance of 35.39 feet along 
the East side of Ntorrlion 
Avenue and running a 
distance of 300 feet along 
the Northern property line. 
Said parcel is known as 
Lots 4 and 5 and Part of 
Lots 6, 10 and 11, Block 4, 
Plan of Lynnhaven, and 
contains 0.75 acre more or 
less. (Pinewood Gardens- 
Lynnhaven Areas). LYNN- 
HAVEN BOROUGH. 

4. Petition by Resolution 
of the Honorable Council, 
City of Virginia Beach, for a 
CHANGE OF ZON- 
ING DISTRICT CLAS.'i- 
IFICATION from A- 
1 Apartment District to R-2 
Residential District on 
certain property located at 
■the Northern terminius of 
North Plaza Trail and 
North m Ktngs Lake Drive, 
running a distance of 1768.2 
feet along the Eastern 
property line, rwining a 
distance of 269.29 feet along 
the Northern property line 
(Branch of Lynnhaven 
River), running a distance 
of 872.27 feet aloi^ the 
Western property line 

(Ktnt^ Lake) and rwmkig a 
distance of UI8 ta« eleng Aw 
teuHiem prop*r|p line 



(Klnss Lake). Said parcel Is 
known n Kings Orant, Part 
2, Section land contains 30.75 
acres more or leas. Plata 
with more detailed In- 
formatkm are available In 
MM Office of the Plannina 
Department. (Klnes Grant 
Area), lynnhaven 

BOROUGH. 

5. Petition of Carl N. 
Moore for a change of zoning 
diatrlct classification from 
AG-1 Agricultural District 
with Historic and Cultural 
District Regulatlbns to 00 
Office District with Historic 
and Cultural District 
Regulations on certain 
property located at the 
Southeast corner of North 
Landing Road and West 
Neck Road running a 
distance of 690 feet along 
the East side of West Neck 
Road, running a distance of 
480 feet along the Northern 
property line of which 389 

-M feet Is the South side of 
North Landing Road, 
running a distance of 752.27 
feet along the Eastern 
property line. Said parcel Is 
irregular in shape and 
contains 3.964 acres. 
(Princess Anne Municipal 
Center Area). PRINCESS 
^(Ne borough. 

6. Petition of Holloman 
Brown Funeral Home for a 
CHANGE OF ZON- 
ING DISTRICT CLASS- 
IFICATION from 
AG-1 Agricultural District 
to 0-1 Office District on 
certain property beginning 
at a point 2780 feet more or 
less South of the 
intersection of Landstown 
Road and Holland Road, 
runnthg a distance of 467.02 
feet along the Northern 
property line of which 
102.56 feet is the South side 
of Holland Road, running a 
distance of 674.78 feet along 
the Eastern property line, 
running a distance of 750 
feet along the Southern 
property line and running a 
distance of 861.07 feet along 
the Western property line. 
Said parcel contains 7.82 
acres. Plats with more 
detailed information are 
available In the 
Department of City 
Planning. PRINCESS 
ANNE BOROUGH. 



CONDITIONAL 
PERMIT: 



USE 



7. Application of 
Holloman Brown Funeral 
"^omefora CONDITIONAL 
USE PERMIT to operate a 
cemetery on certain 
property beginning at a 
point 3050 feet more or less 
North of Princess Anne 
Road and running^ a 
distance of 3146.87 feet 
along the Western property 
line of which 178 feet is the 
East side of Landstown 
Road, running a distance of 
2718.57 feet along the 
Northern property line and 
running a distance of 
1166.56 feet along the 
Eastern property line of 
which 227.77 feet is the West 
side of Holland Road, 
running a distance of 
3073.54 feet along the 
Southern property line. 
Said parcel contains 117.32 
acres. ^RINCESS ANNE 

borough: t — 

Richard J. Webbon 
'^ City aerk - 

,„.1-T, 16,2T 

Request a resolution by 
City Council upon 
recommendation of the 
Planning Department to 
change the street name of 
that portion now known as 
Bonney Rd. extending 
North of Princess Anne Rd. 
to the intersection of South 
Witchduck Rd. and Bonney 
Rd. to South Witchduck Rd. 



'NOTICE TO THE 
PUBLIC" 



Notice Is hereby given to 
the public that Virginia 
Electric and Power Com- 
pany has applied to the State 
Corporation Commission for 
authority to amend its 
^.Purchased GAS Adjustment 
Factor. Its present ad- 
justment factor provides for 
automatic increases or 
decreases in charges to gas 
customers because of 
changes in wholesale costs of 
gas purchsed from pipelines. 
The present Increases or 
decreases in the wt«olesale 
cost of pipeline gas passed on 
to me Company's customers 
through the adjustment 
factor are changes mat are 
approved by the Federal 
Power Commission which 
has jurisdiction over the 
Interstate sale of pipeline 
gas. Under the terms of the 
revised adjustment factor, 
the Company will be 
authorized to pass on to Its 
customers, in addition to 
pipeline cost changes me cost 
of supplemental sources of 
gas Including, but not limited 
to, liquefied natural gas 
(LNG), liquefied petroleum 
gas (LPG), and other 
hydrocarbons distrltHitad to 
customers or used as feed- 
stock for substitute natural 
gas (SNG). Yhe cost to me 
Company of the sup- 
plen«ental sources of gas will 
not t>e regulated. 

In Case No. 19173, after 
notice to ttie public and a 
public hearing, me Com- 
mission determined ftiat all 
gas utilities should be 
authorized to seek and 
develop supplemental 
sources of gas because of the 
present gas shortage which 
prevails throughout the 
nation. The Commission 
further determined mat the 
gas utilities should be 
alk>wed to file revised ad- 
justment factors which in- 
clude the cost of sup- 
plemental sources of gas. 

Virginia Electric and 
Power Company has been 
authorized to place the 
revised adjustment facfw 
into effect for gas serv%e 
rendered on and after 
J«Mj«y 1, 1974. The revlston 
is subject to forttier m- 
vestlgatkm, upon motkm of 
the Commission, or upon 
motion' of any interes^d 
party tar goad cause, if such 
objecthm Is filed in writing 
wim tlw Commfssloo on or 
before FeteruwTf 4, 1974. 

The ^)pti catio n ami a copy 
of me Twitttt adlusiinent 
factor is avslMrie for review 
in all business offices of the 
Compwiy whwe bill* may be 
paid wMWn me territory ^m- 
whtch it provides gas 
serivdce «id in the o«K»s of 
' the State Corporation 
Commission, Richomond, 
y(rginla<. Any interested, 
member of the public 



wishing to object to approval 
of tlM revised adiustment 
factor tiwuld Inform the 
Commission of such ob- 
lection, in writing, wMressed 
10 William C. Young, Clerk, 
State Corporation Com- 
fnintan, P.O. Box 11V7, Rich- 
^nond, Virginia 23309, and a 
copy should be sent to Guy T. 
Tripp, III, counsel for the 
Company, P.O. Box 1535, 
Richnwnd. Virginia 23313. 
Anyone wishing lo be heard 
orally by me Commlsskm 
should so Indicate In me 
written notice. 

"VIRGINIA ELECTRIC 
AND POWER COMPANY" 

1-9. 16, 23, 31 -4T 

NOTICE 

Virginia: 

The regular meeting 
the Council of the City 
Virginia Beach will be hold 
in the Council Chambers of 
the Administration 
Building, City Hall, 
Princess Anne Station, 
Virginia Beach, Virginia, 
on Monday, January 14, 
1974, at 2:00 P.M. at which 
time the following 
appllcf^tions will be heard: 
Change of Zoning District 
Classifications: 
VIRGINIA BEACH 
BOROUGH 

1. Petition Of Broyles, 
McKenry, Gorrv and Dills 
for a CHANGE OF ZON- 
ING DISTRICT CLASSI- 
FICATION from A- 
1 Apartment District to B-4 
Resort Commercial 
District on certain property 
Beginning at a point 125 feet 
more or less West of Pacific 
Avenue, running a distance 
of 125 feet along the North 
side of 35th Street, running 
a distance of 150 feet along 
the East side of Sea Pines, 
running a distance of 125. 
feet .along the Northern 
property lino and running a 
distance of 150 feet along 
the Eastern property line. 
Said parcel Is known as Lot 
J, Plat of Sea Pines and 
contains 18,750 square feet. 
Planning Commission 
recommends modification 
to A-2 Apartment District. 
VIRGINIA BEACH 
BOROUGH. >, 
LYNNHAVEN BOROUGH 

2. Petition Of T. E. Hurley 
for a CHANGE OF ZON- 
ING DISTRICT CLASSI- 
FICATION from R- 
6 Residential District to A-4 
Apartment' District on 
certain property located on 
the East side of Matt Lane 
and at the Eastern 
extremity of Garden Drive, 
running a distance of 137.40 
feet along the East side of 
Matt Lane, running a 
distance of 133.56 feet along 
the Northern property line, 
running a distance of 137.42 
feet along the Eastern 
property line and running a 
distance of 135.60 feet along 
the Southern property line.- 
Said parcel contains 18,500 
square feet more or less, 
and Is known as 
"Unnumbered Parcel, Plat 
"A" of Additional Lots, 
West Oceana Gardens." 
(West Oceana Gardens 
Area). LYNNHAVEN 
BOROUGH. 

3. Petition of Grayson M. 
Whitehurst, Jr. (Fralln 8i 
Waidron, inc.) by Grover C. 
Wright, Jr., Attorney, for a 
CHANGE OF ZON- 
ING DISTRICT CLASSI- 
FICATION from R- 
4 Residential District to 0-1 
Office District on certain 
property beginning at a 
point 1300 feet more or less 
North of Will-OWIsp Drive, 
and 400 feet East of First 
Coloniai Road, running a 
distance of 422.72 feet along 
the Northern property line, 
running a distance of 400 
feet along the Eastern 
property line and running a 
distance of 522.72 feet along 
the Southern property line 
and running a distance of 
400 feet along the Western 
property line. Said parcel 
contains 4.8 acres. (General 
Hospital of Virginia Beach 
Area). LYNNHAVEN 
BOROUGH. 

4. Petition Of Colonial 
Investors, a Partnership by 
Thomas C. Broyles, 
Attorney, for a CHANGE 
OF ZONING DISTRICT 
CLASSIFICATION from R- 
4 Residential District to 0-1 
Office District on certain 
property located at the 
Southeast corner of WiilO- 
Wisp Drive and First 
Colonial Road, running a 
distance of 489.63 feet along 
the East side of First 
Colonial Road, running a 
distance of 591.32 feet along 
the South side of Wiil-O 
Wisp Drive, running a 
distance of 541.71 feet along 
the Eastern property line 
and running a distance of 
573.47 feet along the North 
side of Wildwood Drive. 
Said parcel contains 6.78 
acres. (General Hospital of 
Virginia Beach area). 
LYNNHAVEN BOROUGH. 

5. Petition of Hado 
Development Corp. (Harold 
W. James, Jr.) by by James 
A. Evans, Attorney, for a 
CHANGE OF ZON- 
ING DISTRICT CLASSI- 
FICATION from A- 
1 Apartment District to' B-2 
Community Business 
District on certain property 
beginning at a point 404 feet 
more or less East of Gary 
Street and 150 feef North of 
Virginia Beach Boulevard, 
running a distance of 279 
feet along the Southern 
property line, running a 
distance of 1450 feet more 
or less along me South side 
of Old Virginia Beach Road, 
and running a distance of 
1399 feef along the Eastern 
property line. Said parcel Is 
known as part of Lots 36 and 
27, Plat of Oceana Gardens, 
excluding a parcel 205 feet 
by 105 feet of Lot 36, and 
contains 9 acres more or 
less. Plats with more 
detailed information are 
available In the 
Department of Planning. 
(Oceana Area). 
LYNNHAVEN BOROUGH. 
Cenditieaal Use Permits: 

6. Application of Hado 
Development Corp. (Harold 
W. James, Jr.) by James A. 
Evans, Attorney, for a 
CONDITIONAL USE 
PERMIT for bulk storage 
yard (mini warehouses) on 
certain property beginning 
at a point 404 feet more or 
less Cast M Gary Street, 
running a distance of 279 
feet more or less along me 
North side of Virginia 
Beach Boulevard, running 
a distance of 1^)0 feet more 
or less along the Western 
l^opertv lino, running a 
distance of 310 feet more or 
loss along me South side of 
Old Virgif^ Beoch Road, 



running a distance of 1549 
feet al^g the Eastern 
property tine. Said parcel Is 
known as Lot 27 and part of 
Lot 36, Plat of Ocean* 
Gardens, excluding a 
parcel 305 feet by 105 feet of 
Lot 36. The total parcel 
contains 10 acres more or 
loss. -Plats with more 
detailed Information are 
available In the 

Department of Planning. 
(Oceana Area). 
LYNNHAVEN BOROUGH. 
PUNGO BOROUGH 

7. Application of Sidney 
Boale for a CONDITIONAL 
USE PERMIT to operate a 
kennel on certain property 
beginning at a point 3600 
foot more or less South of 
South Stowo Road, running 
a distance of 210 foot along 
the West side of Princess 
Anno Road, running a 
distance of 420 foot along 
the Southern property lino, 
running a distance of 210, 
foot along the Western 
property line and running a 
distance of 420 foot along 
the Northern property line. 
Said parcel contains 2 acres 
more or loss, PUNGO 
BOROUGH. 



Richard J. Webbon 
City Clerk 



1-2,9-2t 



VIRGINIA: IN THE 
CLERK'S OFFICE OF 
THE CIRCUIT COURT OF 
THE CITY OF VIRGINIA 
BEACH, ON THE 26TH 
DAY OF DECEMBER, 1973 

In Chancery 

No. 16476- B 

In re: Adoption of Lorl 

Lynn Collins 

By: Hal Max Kanoy and 

Jean Audrey Kanoy, 

Petitioners 

To: Philip M. Collins 

234 Bonn's Road 

Newport News, Virginia 

ORDER 

This day came Hal Max 
Kanoy and Joan Audrey 
Kanoy, Petitioners, and 
represented that tho object 
of this proceeding Is to 
effect the adoption of tho 
above named Infant(s), 
Lorl Lynn Collins by Hal 
Max Kanoy and Jean 
Audrey Kanoy, husband 
and wife, and affidavit 
having been made and filed 
that Philip M. Collins, a 
natural pai'ont of said 
child, tho last known post 
office address being: 234 
Bonn's Road, Newport 
News, Virginia. 

it Is therefore Ordered 
that the said Philip M. 
Collins appear before this 
Court within ton (10) days 
after publication of this 
Order and Indicate his-her 
attitude toward tho 
proposed adoption, or 
otherwise do what is 
necessary to protect his 
interest in this matter. 

John V. Fentress, Clerk 
By: Sandra Hargorve D.C. 

William C. Bunch, Jr. 

Bunch and Swannor 

Attorneys At Law 

4565 Virginia Beach 

Boulevard 

Virginia Boach, Virginia, 

23^3 

1-2, 9, 16, 23-4T 

Commonwealth of Virginia, 
in the Clerk's Office of 
the Circuit Court of tho City 
of Virginia Beach, on tho 
26th day of December, 1973. 
Harold M. Quigley, 
Plaintiff, 
against 

Elizabeth C. Quigley, 
Defendant. 

ORDER OP 
PUBLICATION 

The object of this suit is 
for the «ald plaintiff to 
obtain a divorce a mensa et 
Ihoro on the grounds of 
desertion to be later 
merged into a divorce a 
vinculo matrimonii from 
the said defendarrt, upon the 
grounds of desertion. 

And an affidavit having 
been made and filed that 
the defendaht is not a 
resident of the State of 
Virginia, tho last known 
post office address being: 
28 Quissett Harbor Road, 
Falmouth, Massachusetts. 

It Is ordered that she do 
appear here within 10 (ton) 
days after due publication 
hereof, and do what may bo 
necessary to protect her 
interest in this suit. 

JOHN V. FENTRESS, 

CLERK 

Phyllis N. Styron, Deputy 

Clerk. 

Mr. Oslo H, Gay, Jr., Atty. 
2871 River Road, 
Virginia Beach, Virginia 
1 2,9,16,23-4t 

mmmmmimmmmmmmmm 

Commonwealth of Virginia, 
In the Clerk's office of mo 
Circuit Court of tho City of 
Virginia Beach, on me 36th 
day of December, 1973. 
John D^vld Lindly, 
Plaintiff, 
against 

Debora B. Lindly, 
Defendant. 

ORDEROF 
PUBLICATION 

The object of this suit Is 
for the said plaintiff to 
obtain a divorce A Mensa 
Et Thoro to be later merged 
into a Divorce A Vinculo 
Matrimonii from the said 
'defendant, upon the 
grounds of desertion. 

And an affidavit having 
been made and filed that 
the defendant is not a 
resident of me State of 
Virginia, the last kngwn 
post office address being: 
3936 N. Keeior Avenue, 
Chicago, Illinois. 

It is ordered that she do 
appear here within 10 (ten) 
days after due publication 
hereof, and do what may be 
necessary to protect h«- 
inforest in this suit. 

JOHN V FENTRESS, 

CLERK 

Phyllis N. Styron, Deputy 

Clerk 

Mr. George F. Darden, Jr., 
Atty. 

M5-30m Street, 
Virginia Beach, Virginia 
- 1-2,9,16.23-4t 

ORDER OF 
PUBLICATION 

COMMONWEALTH OF 
VIRGINIA, 

In me Clerk's Office of 
mo circuit Court of mo City 
of Virginia Beach, on mo 
11th day ot December, 1973. 
WcPherson Corprew, 
PlaMtm, # 



agllnsf 

Alice Corprew, Dotandant. 

Thoobjoctofthlssult'lsto 
obtain a divorce A Vinculo 
Matrimonii from the said 
defendant, upon the 
grounds of two years 
mutual separation. 

And an affidavit having 
l^on made and filed that 
tho defendant is not a 
resident of tho State of 
Virginia, the last known 
post offico address being: 
362 Handcock Street, 
Brooklyn, New York, 
' It Is ordered that she do 
appear here within ten (10) 
days after due publication, 
hereof, and do what ma.y bo 
necessary to protect' her 
interest In this suit. 
A copy Teste: JOHN V. 
FENTRESS: CLERK 
BY: Sandra Hargrove 
D.CIork 

Seymour M. Teach 
617 Law BIdg. 
Norfolk, Virginia 

13-31,38, — 1-3,9,-4t 



ORDER OF 

PUBLICATION 
COMMONWEALTH OF 
VIRGINIA, 

In tho Clerk's Offico of 
tho circuit Court of tho City 
of Virginia Beach, on the 
11th day of December, 1973. 
Joan Mario Riner Burgess, 
Plaintiff, 
against 

Timothy Eugene Burgess, 
Defendant. 

The object of this suit Is to 
obtain a divorce A Vinculo 
Matrimonii from tho said 
defendant, upon the 
grounds of two year 
separation. 

And an affidavit having 
boon made and filed that 
the defendant is not a 
resident of the State of 
Virginia, the last known 
post offico address being: 
100 Morton Avenue, Apt. C- 
6, Albany, New York. 

It Is ordered that he do 
appear here within ten (10) 
days after due publication 
hereof, and do what may be 
necessary to protect his 
Intorost In this suit. 
A copy-Teste; JOHN V. 
FENTRESS: CLERK 
BY: SANDRA 

HARGROVE, Of Clerk 
Tidewater Legal Aid 
700 Duke St. 
Norfolk, VA. 

13.31,38, — 1-2,9 -41 



ORDEROF 
PUBLICATION 

Commonwealth of Virginia 

in the Clerk's Offico of 
tho Circuit court of tho City 
of Virginia Beach, on tho 
14th day of December, 1973 
Dixie Leo Jones Dawion, 
Plaintiff, 
against 

Joe Robert Dawson, 
Defendant. 

The object of this suit is to 
obtain a divorce a vinculo 
matrimonii from the said 
defendant upon tho grounds 
that the parties have lived 
separate and apart 
without any' cohabitation 
and without Interruption for 
two years prior to the 
commencement of this suit. 

And an affidavit having 
boon made and filed that 
the defendant is a non- 
resident of the State of 
Virginia, the last known 
post office address being: 
1310 LIndwood Street, 
Grooniboro, North 
Carolina. 

It is ordered that he do 
appear here within ton (10) 
days after due publication 
horsof , and do what may bo 
necessary to protect his 
Interest In this suit. 
A copy-Teste: John V. 
Fentress, Clerk 
By: J. Curtis Fruit, Deputy 
Clerk 

Moss 8i Moss 
830 Maritime Tower 
Norfolk, Virginia 

13-21,38,— 1-3,9 .«t 



ORDER 

VIRGINIA: 

In the Clerk's Office of 

me Circuit Court of tho City 

of Virginia Beach, on tho 

13th day of December, 1973. 

in Chancery 

No. C-7$-l636 

In re: Adoption of Shcryl 
Lynn Eades and Larry 
Dean Eades, Jr. 
By: Mary Louise Ambrose 
and Wlllard Leo Ambrose, 
Petitioners 

To: Larry Dean Eades, Sr. 
1648 East 73rd Street 
Tulsa, Oklahoma 

This day came Mary 
Louise Ambrose and 
Wlllard Lee Ambrose, 
Petitioners, and 
represented that the object 
of this proceeding Is to 
effect tho adoption of the 
above named Infants, 
Sheryl Lynn Eades and 
Larry Dean Eades, Jr., by 
Mary Louise Ambrose and 
Wlllard Lee Ambrose, 
hucband and wife, and 
affidavit having been made 
'and filed that Larry Dean 
Eades, Sr., a natural parent 
ot said Children, is a non- 
resident of the State of 
Virginia, me last known 
post office address being: 
1648 East 73rd Street, 
Tulsa, Oklahoma. 

It Is therefore Ordered 
mat the said Larry Dean 
Eades, Sr., a natural parent 
this*Court within ten (10) 
days after publication of 
mis Order and indicate his 
attitude toward the 
proposed adoption, or 
otherwise do what is 
necessary to protect his 
Interest in mis matter. 
A copy teste: John v. 
Fentress, Clerk 
By: J. Curtis Fruit, D.C. 
Steingoid, Steingold and 
Friedman 

Citizens Bank Building 
Norfolk, vrginia 

12-31,28— 1-3,9. 4t 



VIRGINIA: 




^^ 


IN THE CLERK'S OFFICE 


OF THE CIRCUIT COURT 


OF THE 


CITY 


OF 


VIRGINIA 


BEACH, 


ON 


THE 18 


DAY 


OF 


DECEMBER 


, 1973. 




IN CHANCERY 




73-1487 





In re: Adoption of 
DERRELL KEITH 
GREENE 

By: SADIE LOUISE 
LUNDY, Petitioner 
T04 Betty Jean rirM>ne 
S82 Powell Street, Apt. 2 
Brooklyn, Mew York 

• ORDER 

This day came SADIE 
LbUlSE LUNDY, 
Potlttoner. and r^rmentod 
Rial Me flfe^ct M HM 
procee^ngi^ to effect ^^ 









^mt 



Page 10— The Sun— Wednesday, January ^, 1974 




Am Clo//ifie4 4a6-M» 

486-1414 



PERSON to PERSON ADS! 



xtii 



UNGIttS 



adoption of the above 
named' infant, OERRELtL 
KEITH GREENE, by 
SADIE LOUISE LUNDY, 
and affidavit having been 
made and filed that Betty 
Jean Greene, a natural 
parent of said child, is a 
nonresident of the State of 
Virginia, the last known 
post office address being; 
582 f*oweli St, Apt." 2, 
Brooklyn, New York. 

It is therefore Ordered 
that the said Betty Jean 
Greene appear before this 
Court within ten (10) days 
after publication of this 
Order and indicate her 
attitude toward the 
proposed adoption, or 
otherwise do what is 
necessary to protect her 
.interest in this matter. 

JOHN V. FENTRESS, 

CLERK 

BY: J. Curtis Fruit, O.C. 

James R. McKenry 
3500 Pacific Avenue 
Virginia Beach, Virginia 

12-21,28, 1-2,9 4T 



-"\ 1 — SUNSHINE ADS 



WHAT DO FROGS SAY 
.PURING AN ENERGY 
CRISIS-DtMIT-OIMIT! 



OICK-Saturday was great 
fun, can't wait to do It 
again! Dee. 

WELCOME HOAAE GUS, I 
really missed you. 11 sure is 
good to have ybu back! 
Diane & the gang. 

TO THE GAUS FAMILYA 
Happy and Healthy New 
Year! Edith and Charlie. 

TIMMY-Congratulations on 
winning your first 
basketball game. Your 
father Is very proud of you. 
(me too) 

Gary-You are reading your 
sunshine ad In a really 
great paperl 



3 Special Notice* 



■ AuroMonvEB 



t1 AirtomoMin For Safi 

CAPRI-'7l, 4 speed. 
Immaculate inside and out. 
$1,595. 
DAVJS CORNER MOTORS 

497-8100 Va. Lie. 3211 

CHEVROLET — 1965 
Impala; 4 door, good 
condition, best offer; 420- 
1317. 

BUICK — 1968 Le Sabre, 2 
door hardtop, power brakes 
Sr steering. Exc, cond. 4 
new tires. Air conditioning. 
340-4607. 



RATES;. "Person to 
Person" ads for in- 
di v id u aU- ba y i n g, se llin g ,- 



renting, or offering a 
service. Up to 12 words,, 
only St. per issue, add SO 
cents for each additional 4 
words. 

Classified display $3.44. 
per column inch, with a 
minimum charge of $7.28' 
except on contract basis. 

Business Rates: First 16 
words in straight 
classified are S2.00 Lower 
rates may be earned. 

DEADLINE lor 
classified & classified 
display is Noon on the 
fy/tonday prior to 
publication date. 

Place ads at the SUN 
office 138 5. Rosemont 
Rd., Va. Beach, Va. 234S2, 
or mail "to, Classified 
Desk ; or phone 486-3433 or 
486-3434. Classifieds are 
priced on cash basis; 
payment is diie upon 
receipt'of statement. 



HAWAIIAN FLOOR SHOWS 
— South Sea Islanders; 
Private parties, Luaus, 
Lodges, Pool parties. Call 
Ted Grimes; 499-1428 after 4 
PM. 

CANDY THE CLOWN 
Bi rthda ys. Promotional, , 
Grand Openings. 587-3697. 

SEWING — done in my 
home, alterations. Children 
or adults; Fine work, 486- 
7610. >* 

THE PEMBROKE POP 
PETS — Are now available 
for Birthday Parties, Special 
Events, etc. Children and 
Adult entertainment. 497- 
4141, 497-0982. 



1000-79^ 

Gummed return address 
labels. Please print Name, 
Address 8, Zip Code Price 
includes tax. 

double "G" enterprises 
Ltd. PO BOX 572 Virginia 
Beach, Va. 23451 (No 
Stamps Please) 



1 SUNSHINE ADS 



BILL Your cheery voice 
brightened my day, 
Thanks. Miss Popularity. 



BLOOD DONORS 
NEEDED 

Earn immediate cash. $40 to 
$60 a month. Blood plasma 
urgently needed. 

NORFOLK 
PLASMA COR P. 

733GranbySt. 623-3173 



QUICK CHECK 
CLASSIFIED INDEX 



ANNOUNCEMENTS 



Sunthlne Ads _ 1 

Personal Notlcet 2 

Special Services 3 

Transportation 4 

Lost & Found 5 

Card of Thanks « 

In Memof iam 7 

MonumentsBurlal Lots 8 



AUTOMOTIVE 



AutonidbllestorSale 11 

Trucks, Trailers, Jeeps 12 

Wanted Automotive 1 JA 

Autos, Trucks fOr hire 13 

Auto Parts, Repairs U 

Auto Access. Painting 14A 

Utility Trailers 15 

Buses ISA 

Wanted Trailers 1SB 

Motorcycles, Scooters 14 

Aircraft for sale, parts IT 



I RECREATIONAL \ 

Campers, Trailers 11 

Rec.Vetiicles for hire ...ISA 

Camp. Sports Efluip 1* 

Beach Supplies 30 

Boats, Marine Supplies 11 

Boats for.Hire 31A 



DODGE — 1967 RT. 
Excellent condition. $450 or 
,take over payments. 425- 
■ 1991. 

fORD — 1966 Galaxle 2 
door hardtop, jair, power 
steering. Excellent cond. 
Extra clean. 340-4607. 

FORD — Galaxie 1965, 
avtomatic, excellent 
running condition. $400. 484- 
4457. 

OLDS— 1972 Cutlass 
Supreme, air, automatic, 
AM FM radio and tape, low 
nniieage, excellent 
condition. *3J50^499^2^7a 

OLDSMOBILE 88 custom 
sedan, 1968. Original owner. 
Black vinyl top. Make offer. 
486-3464. 

LINCOLN — CON- 
,/riNENTAL 1970 Mark Ml. 
Blue with white vinyl top. 
White leather Interior, loaded 
with all the extras, new 
radial tires. In A-1 condition. 
Very clean. 38,000 mi)es. 
Selling to settle estate. 
Owner, 427-1787 after 6 pm 
weekdays, anytime week- 
days^ 

PEUGEOT - 1969, 
automatic transmission, 
positive steering. Good 
Transportation. $800. 486- 
7843. 



RENAULT 

The nation's largest selection of 

fed Renaults from the nation's 
rgest Renault dealer. All 
models, colors and prices. Most 
are one owner cars with our 
famous one year warranty. 

EASTERN AUTO 

933 E LITTLE CREEK RD. 588 
]V' * 



EMPLOYMENT 



] 



MERCHANDISE 



Articles for Sale 51 

Antiques 51A 

Household Goods , .52 

GarageRummage S2A 

Wanted to Buy 53 

Swap-Trade 53A 

Musical Merchandise 54 

TV Radio Stereo 55 

Electronic Equipment 55A 

Coins and Stamps 5* 

Jewelry fc Watches 57 

Wearing Apparel 57A 

GoodYhlngstoEat 5* 

Farm and Dairy Products 5(A 

Firewood 5» 

Lawn and Garden «0 

SeedS'PlantS'Flowers 

Feed and Fertlllier tl 

Farm Iniplements 41A 

Machinery and Tools .42 

Building Materials 43 

Business Equipment 44 



I MOBILE HOMESJ 



MobUettomes lor Sale «s 

AMWIe Homes for Rent '. 65A 

Mobile Home Movers i5ft 

Atobile Home Sites M 

Mobile Homes Wanted . 6«A 



ROOMS-HOTELS | 

Rooms with Board W 

Rooms without Board « 

Rooms for Housekeeping «» 

Resorts Hotels «• 

Restaurants '1 

Wanted-Rooms or Board 72 



VOLKSWAGEN — 1971 van, 
equipped for camping, stereo 
tape player, call 425-7793 
nights. 



U Tnicla, Tniten. lecpi 



FORD PICKUP - 1965, 
rebuilt engine, needs little 
work, $200, also 1965 Ford 6- 
cylinder engine, 170 cu. in., 
$100. Phone 438-0352 or 429-. 
5784. 

FORD PICK-UP, '59, F-100, 
V 8 automatic. Special $388. 
DAVIS CORNER MOTORS 
497-8100 Va. Lie. 3211 



IS Campers, Trallar^ 



LAYTON — 1963, 13" Sleeps 3, 
Ice box, stove, sink, water 
and electrical connections. 
See it and make a reasonable 
offer. 427-3273. 



■ EMPLOYMENT 1 



n Help Wanted Female 

GIRL TO DO light 
housework and baby sitting 
after school. 499-2854j 



33 Help Wanted Male 



BOYS CLUB DIRECTOR, 
Virginia Beach. National 
Youth Serving Agency, 
$9500 plus full fringe 
benefits, 3 weeks vacation, 
degree plus 3 to 5 years 
related experience. Mail 
confidential resume to P.O. 
BOX 11101, Norfolk, 
Virginia. 23517. 

34 Help Wanted M-F 

AMBITIOUS PERSONS 
WHO WANT TO EARN 
BUT CAN ONLY WORK 
PART-TIME. Opportunity 
to earn $3. or more per 
hour. Training given. Call 
for appointment only, 497- 
2236. 

COLLEGE STUDENTS- 
Work Study scholarship 
available at the ocean. Join 
Ocean City College. For 
Information call (301) 289 
4065 or Inquire: Ocean City 
College, P.O. Box "L", 
Ocean City, Maryland 
21842. 

Large Corporation 
expanding. Need 2 positive 
thinking men or women. We 
prepare you to earn $125 
weekly or better, If 
qualified. Call Mr. Bailey, 
499 4606 weekdays, 8:30 to 
10:00 A.M. 



34He»WMitedM-P 



<7 Do»$, Cats, OWwf Ptt« 57A Weaiim Annul 



w 



PROFESSIONAL REALTY CORP., 

has excellent opporttmlty for 
licensed real estate 
salespeople. Advantages 
such as generous com- 
mission split; extra 
benefits; bonus; Insurance. 
Very active in new home 
developments and resale^ 
Also unimproved and rural 
sales. Member Metro MLS. 
Two completely staffed 
offices and four field 
locations. Continuous 
training and much more. 
For appointment and con- 
fidential discussion call 
Paul King, 3404000; 464 
4979 



GREAT 6ANE - AKC 
registered, black, terms. 
428 8578 

HAMSTERS— 2 females 
with cage, very tame. $5. 
Call Mrs. Parker, 486-3430, 



NEEDED 

8 People for fast growing 
business. You niust 
qualify. 

499-0876 

BY APPOINTMENT 

ONLY 



PEKINGESE — AKC, 1 
male, 1 female. Reasonably 
priced. 499-5176. 



51 Aititlw for Sale 

FOUR pachfnko games. $25. 
apiece, $100 for all. 340-9022. 

INSULATION — 3W full 
thick. 4.29 roll. Area Hard- 
ware, 3365 Military hwy. 853- 
1379. 

INVALID'S WALKER — 
Aluminum; adjustable; 
excellent condition, never 
U^ed. $20. 427-1787. 

MINOLTA MC RokkQf 135 
MM, F-3.5 lens with leather 
case and skyllgttt filter. $90. 
481-0502 evenings. 



WANTED: FULL 
TIME R6AL ESTATE 

SALESPEOPLE 

Better than 50 per cent 
split, no pressure. Good 
opportunity for the right 
people. 

R.B. Smith Real Estate, 
phone 486-1177; nights 340- 
7388. 


Toys, tricycit* and inch 
worm, others; girls 
clothing, sizes 18, 2, some 
new. 486-6215. 


SlAAntiquei 


» 


WE BUY & SELL 
OLD & USED 
FURNITURE 

SHIRLEY'S ANTIQUES 

3008 Lafayette blvd. 
855-4385 853-9537 


36 Jobs Waiitaci 


BABYSITTING - London 
Bridge area. For working 
mothers. Experienced. 486- 
7843. 



MINK COAT— Maxie> blond 
size 10-13. Reasonable. 340- 
9135. 



U ■vIMing Materials 



HOME Builders 8< Con- 
tractors - Let us help you 
with ttiat new home, ad- 
ditions or repairs. We can 
furnish materials from 
basement to attic and aid you 
in financing. Phone 
KELLAM & EATON 427-3200. 



64 Bvflnass Eciulpmwit 



DICTATING MACHINES — 
one set of tuo. "DIct-A- 
phone". Excellenfconditlon. 
464-9395, 428-9179. 

RENT OR BUY ^ new & 
used office ftjrniture. Ex- 
rental desks $49 & up. New 
damaged files $39 8i up. Free 
delivery. 

DESKS, INC. 
3411 High St. 397 7883 



65 Mobile Homes Sale 



72 Capelia - 12' x 65' with 
expansion, fully carpeted, 
drapes. Has to be moved. 
Assume balance. 
Must Sell. 499-3401 



Help Wanted Female 32 

Help Wanted Atole 33 

HelpWanledMF 34 

Resumes, Listings 35 f 

Jobs Wanted U I 



REAL ESTATE FOR RENT 



I FINANCIAL I 

Buslneu Opportunities 3| 

Wanted to Buy Business 3<A 

Stocks and Bonds 39 

Loans Mortgages « 

Wantedto Barrow 4\ 

I INSTRUCnON \ 

correspondence Course 43 

Local Instruction Clanes O 

General Instructions .43A 

Music Dance Dramatics 44 

Private Instructions 45 , 

Instructions WanIM 4«, _ 



Apartments-Furnlsttcd 73 

Apartments, Unfurnished 74 

Garages for Rent 75 

Farms and Land for Rent 76 

AtoversStorage 7«A 

Houses forRenI 77 

Furnished ftousos 77A 

Resort l>ropcrty for Rent 7S 

Suburban for Rent 7tA 

Outof Town for Rent TtB 

Wanted loR«)t 7t 

For Rent or Sals M 

Ground Leases HA 

Business Places for Rent II 

Offices and Desk Space tIA 

IndMlrW tor ReM IIB 







BABYSITTING— in my 
home, nice yard. Hilltop 
Manor. 425-8832. 

BABYSITTING— My home. 
Princess Anne Plaza Area. 
340-8936. 

NURSES .^ AIDE— desires 
private dutf, 3 p.m. to 11 
p.m. or 11 iJ.m. to 7 a.m. 
Own transportation. 853- 
6435. 

RESTAURANT MANAGER 
— experienced in large 
volume units. Seeks good 
opportunity. 428-0257. 

1 r-s 

TYPIJNG — i,'#i:niy hopie, 
experienced secretary; 
reasonable. 420-9584. 



38 Businew Opportunity 

BUSINESS Opportunity — 
can make $1,000 a month 
part-time. Call 340-1317 for 
appt. No information on 
phone. 

43 Local Instruction aines 



$2 Househpld Goods 



BEAUTIFUL 5 ft. glass & 
chrome cocktail table. 
Bought at Haynes. 427-2403. 

DINING ROOM SUITE— 
Mahogany, table, 6 chairs, 
corner cabinet. Very good 
condition. Call 340-5659. 

riviNG~ROOM SUITE — 
Green and Gold Color 
Scheme, modern decor, 
couch, chair, coffee table, 
end table, lamp, and 2 sets of 
full length drapes. $300 or 
best offer. 425-5880. 

KEFRfGERATOR — 
Apartment size. Copper-tone, 
in very good condition. $70. 
Call 427-1787 after 6 p.m., 
anytime weekends. 

SIMMONS HIDE-A-Bed 
Sofa, Like new. Black and 
bronze floral, $125, 486-3464. 

TABLE — Drop leaf dining 
room, Duncan Phyfe. 428- 
9179. 



66ci44i£ied 

DIAL-486-3433 
or 486-3434 




or 





MONTESSORI 

MUSIC 
WORKSHOP 




AflMlMMl. tmofl groupt, flmlMa 
schttfHlInf, certified Nenlessorl 
teac)««r. Oilld is construction of 
hissell through creative self 
expression. Basic concepts, 
I>e9innjng piano FORTE 

Foundation 428 &339 428 6373. 



S3 Wantwl to Buy 



ELECTRK TRAINS — 
Lionel, Flyer, any condition. 
Cash paid. 427-6256. 

Portable TV's, record 
players, radios, toy trains, 
5456242. For the Glory of 
the Lord! 

WE NEED BADLY 
Cash paid for cameras, tape 
recorders, stereos, TV's, 
Band instruments, 
Typewriters, ggns. 

LITTMAN'S . 
201 City Hall av. 622-6989 



S4 Musical Merctondist 



43A.Gefferal Instructiofls 

VOICE LESSONS — 
Beginners, advanced. Jarnes 
AAorrlSSOl, 428-0587, 

44 Music-Dance-Drama 



ORGAN — Orcoa Concert, 
like new, $150. 420-3319. 

PIANO — Stelnway, upright. 
$800. 428-6734, 

s^oln^m^tam^^^^ 



CRIMES! 



1SCHOOL 



GUITAR CLASSES 
In Pembroke Area 
Students Taught In Small 
Groups According to Ages 
After 4 P.M. 499-1428 



BUYING 

SILVER COINS 

BEFORE ISM 

HIGHEST PRICES PAID! 
NORVIEWCOINSHOP 

Discount on all 
Supplieswith this Ad 
6212SewellsPt. Rd. 

Phone 853-81 18 



<7A Wearing Appnd 

MINK COAT — Blonde, 
maxi, size 10-12, Cost $1,250, 
sell $625. New, 340-9135. 



34 Help Wanted MF 



'■f 



.SUPER 

USED CAR DEAL 



Irers-uvESToacI 



DB9. Cots, other Pets 47 

Pet stud Service . 47A 

Horses, Cattle, Etc 4( 

POtMtrv 4 Supplies m 

wanted Livestock 4*A 



DIRECTORIES 



IMMS tSRVKa-eePAIR »WIDC 

Under Real Estate 



REAL ESTATE FOR SALE 1 1 

Indostrtalfor Sale MC 

Business Property Sale •! 

Investment Property .W* 

Apartments for Sale WB 

Fwms Land Timber M 

Real Estate Notices 14 

p«r Sole Morfelk jM_ 

For Sale Virginia Beach ~U 

Par Sale Chesapealie 17 

^m Sale Porlsmoulh . . M 

CondBffilniums MA 

SiAurlMn for Sole W 

Aesert Property tar Sal* ei 

Oulat Town tor Sole n 

LotsforSale 93 

£x^Mnoa9eat Ciiaie -^ 94 

PorSaleor Exchwge « 

Wanted Real Estate N 

New Kiemes lor Sale 97 



mj^em * -^mmem t^ pimom" ao 

IN ANV or TMi Aa«W CLMSWICATIONt 
t LMMS-4 ^Wat-M. 



ICOME SEE OUR COMPLETE! 

SELECTION OF QUALITY 

USED CARS -- MANY 

MAKES AND MODELS 
IFROM WHICH TO CHOOSEI 

We'd like to usher In the New 
Year with our happiest wifhesl 

[to all - May 1974 be your bettf 

year everl 

ILONDON BRIDGE SUZUKI 

12439 Vo. Beoch Blvd., Vo. BBQi\ 

CALL 486*2636 



WHAT ARE YOU WORTH? 

Its up to you. 



Ambitious men or women. None too old. 
Will train in dl phases of our businen. 
Salary while training. Many benefits. 
Hospitalization and Major Medical. $1,000 
per month draw plus bonus. Apply Imme- 
diacy. 



6914 N. Military Highwai, Norfolk. 
Applly in person after 10:00 A.M. 



emcLE 

MOBILE HOMES 

NEW&USED 

NO CASH DOWN 

881 N.AAilitaryHghy. 

( Across froin 

Military Circle) 

420-4444 

D»»laf 



BEAT THE 
FUEL SHORTAGE 

BUY AN ALL 

ELECTRIC 

MOBILE HOME 

WE HAVE LOTS 
FOR ALL 
ELECTRIC COACHES 
AVAILABLE NOW 

DELTONA 

MOBILE HOME SALES 
NORFOLK LOT ...„853-4584 
CHESAPEAKE LOt487-8866 



ALL 1973 
MODELS REDUCED 
TO MAKE ROOM FOR 
1974 MODELS 

1974, 12' wide Aigo- 
Fot Only $4,895 

At 

ANCHOR 

Trailer Sales 

6838 N.Milituy Hwy. 
For infoimation cafl 
collect 804^3-4554 
Va. License 1862 



66 Mobile Home Sites 



LOTS OF LOTS 

We have vacant lots immediately 
available lor each of bur 
customers in either Virginia 
Beach or Chesapeake Forget 
prot»lems, don't drive many miles 
each day. come buy from us, come 
tfve with 

DELTONA 
MOBILE HOME SALES 
The Deafer With Local Lots 

NORf^OLK LOT, 853 4584 
Chesapeake lot, 487 IMM 
CLOSED SUNDAY 



TOP CASH 

PAID FOR USED 
MOBILE HOMES 

Call Jack 

at 

aSSMlt) 

Va. License 0599 



73 Apartmmits-Furnished 



VIRGINIA BEACH 

win!* rates, I room efficiency 
weekly ana menthly rates: ^Mr TV. 
Msic #etins and cooking vtenMi, ail 
utilities '< 

VIROINIAfI 

MOTOR APTS. 

310 24th St. 

428-5333 




74^»tmeiittUnftimMie^^ 

COLONY PINES APTS. 

2 and 3 bedroom apts. In 
exclusive adult complex. 
$180 and $M0 nrtonthly. Call 
486-7363 



77 Houses for Ront 



PRINCESS ANNE PLAZA: 

Newly painted, 3 bedrooms, 2 

bath ranct\. With den and 

garage on fenced lot. Fully 

carpeted. 486-3800 or 481-6429. 

REAL ESTATE CORP. 

OFVIRGINIA 

"For the People" 

PRINCESS ANNE PLAZA — 
beautiful 3 bedrm. 
Townhouse, carpet down, 
oak floors up. Electric heat, 
central air. $215 mo. 428-6265. 

VIRGINIA BEACH- 
QUICK OCCUPANCY 
3, 4and 5 bedroom homes in 
Thalia, Arrowhead, Malibu, 
Green Ruii and Windsor 
Woods. Call 340-9722. 
BISSETT REALTY 



86 For Sate yhgiiUa BeiiA, 

—CAPE HENRY SHORES- 
LARGE AND LOVELY 
completely carpeted 5 
bedroom ranch on deep 
water bulkhe.aded lot. Huge 
beamed ceiling den has 
raised hearth fireplace. 
Screened porch opens -from 
eatin kitchen, separate 
utility room, 2 door garage. 
Owner will finance. 486- 
3800, 481-6429, 481-6866. 
REAL ESTATE CORP. 
OFVIRGINIA 
"FOR THE PEOPLE" 



CHESAPEAKE BEACH- 



m 



BARE FACTS 

Charm and space in 2-»tory 
older home. Direct access 
to boating and fishing. 
Lovelv*waterview. 460-1177; 
Beth Bare, 481-6032. 

PROFESSIONAL REALTY CORP. 



GOING, GOING, GONE! — 
Sell your home fast with a 
Sun Classified AdI Call 486- 
3433. 



THOROUGHGOOD- 



m 



3 bedroom, 2 baths and 
Family room with fireplace. 
Call O.D. King 460-1177; 
481-0227. 

PROFESSIONAL REALTY CORP. 



KING'S GRANT- 

la 

POOL AND PATIO 

Look ahead to \^arm 
weather entertaining. 
Lovely 3 bedroom, 2'/? toath 
Colonial on large wooded 
lot. Screen porch 
overlooking pool and 
beautiful backyard. Low 
50's 340-0000; Tom 
Wynkoop, 340-0329. 

PROFESSIONAL REALTY CORP 



78 Resort Property-Rent 



HOUSES Si 
APARTMENTS 
Available on a yearly or 
short term basis. 

DUCKS REAL ESTATE 

323Laskinrd. 

428-4882 



81A Offices-Desk Space 

PRIME OFFICE SPACE — 
New space available in 
modern, SUN building at 138 
S. Rosemont Rd. next to 
Expressway. Large and 
small unit for several office 
use, ready for you. Call 486- 
3430. 



«SFo( Sale Norfolk 



PRINCESS ANNE PLAZA — 
Split foyer, 4 bedrooms, 2 
baths, panelled den, 2 kit- 
chens, 2-car garage, and 
treesi Call Jim Hill, 547-5339. 
We trade. Higgins Realty, 
Inc., 486-4041. 



LAKE EDWARD WEST 
$27,500 



VACANT 



3 bedroom townhouse on 
quiet court, freshly 
painted. Call Mr. Alien, 
499-7611; nights 497-0408. 



® ESTES 



MEMBER REALTORS MLS 



CAMELLIA SHORES — 
$39,900 

BEAUTIFUL 

Split level on a wooded lot. 
Huge den with fireplace. To 
buy call Marie Hazelbaker, 
499-7611; nights 464-1328. 

® ESTES 

.MEMBER REALTORS MLS 



MALGREN COURT— 
3 bedroom ranch in a quiet 
neighborhood; ideal for 
small children. Call Mr. 
Allen, 499-7611; nights 497- 
0408. 

® ESTES 

Member Realtors MLS 



NORVA HOMES ■ 4 
bedrooms, 2 baths, near 
shopping, bus and schools. 
Call Joe Robinson, 464-4839. 
We trade. Higgins Realty, 
Inc., 486 4041. 



hSOUTHERN POINTS-I 

Large 3 bedroom 

Brick Ranch, 

Low equity 

and assume. 

Call Jim Stanley. 

486-1423 486-U31 

PEOPLE'S REALTY 



SANDBRIDGF- 



@ 



WHY 

Walt till next season to own 
this 3 bedroom home at 
Sandbridge? 340 0000; Don 
Kay, 4810358. 

PROFESSIONAL REALTY CORP. 




86 For Sale Virginia Beach 



THOf?OUGHG00D 
ESTATES 



m 



BARE FACTS 

Super-clean, 3 bedroom 
Colonial ranch on picture 
book lot. Vacant and 
waiting for the lucky 
buyer! 460 1177; Beth Bare, 
4816032. 

PROFESSIONAL REALTY CORP. 



66A Moi>ite Homes WiBJtd 



ALANTON- 



la 



EXCELLENT BUY 

Over 3,000 square feet of 
comfortable living on 
country size lot. Good 
financing. New Hilltop 
area, Ocean and hospital. 
3400000; Jean Cordle, 481- 
4299. 

PROFESSIONAL REALTY CORP 



BIRDNECK POINT- 



m 



5 bedrooms, 4<; baths. 
Older home loaded with 
charm and renovated for 
modern comfort. Call for 
appointment, 340-0000; 
Barbara Kirkpatrick, 486- 
4324. 

PROFESSIONAL REALTY CORP 



WOLFSNARE ROAD 
5 Bedroom Brick Ranch, 
Formal Dining Room, 3 

Baths, Den, and Fireii^ace. < 

All appliances, carpieting i 

and Drapes. 428 3822. i 

DAVE MILLER REALTY I 

WELLINGTON WOODS > 
All electric, 3 Bedrponi,_ 2_^ |^ 

Bath, Ranch. Den^ ' ; 

Fireplace, Formal Dining . i 

Room, and Carpeting. 7 per • 

cent Loan. Make an Offer. ' ' 

428 3822. 'I 

DAVEMILLER REALTY . , 

WINDSOR WOODS — '> 
Charming, warm • and 
immaculate 4 bedroom 
Colonial with den, fireplace 

and built-in kitchen. H 

Beautifully landscaped. J 

Call Mary Rau, 486 3248. We f 

trade. Higgins Realty, 486 , 
4041. 



38 Jbtdmm Op|>ortunitie> 



^MWMMS 

AUTO HOME ACCESSORIES & CARE PRODUCTS 

Htm natkvtmf lyrtam p** mMi^mcn a« ivefiun to disiftbuic muH' miHion S pra wM 
•#*#rtt«*d producit of 6 mato^ US cempsnto m ih* titvcn b»tl*Dn % Aut0^4*fn« 
protfHcU fM«. nMtodi our company wcyrvd acroumt wtthly witli hn^ pKolti. 
iHfh imputM. tMt r«pval censunw pmitutii from 



SMMomi nxin dommit jomoonwax 

HOltVUWOO ACC^SORIES PREMIUM TOOLS 

K2r MMITOII IN A MIUM. fAMTASTIK SrilAV h WASH. SU^tR SRAVO. 
PLCOGE FUTURE, CiAOf AaILT WAX MASTER WAX 7EREX, VlfTA 
J/W AX k MANV OTHERS <« 

M mam. m»mm % wun ai a uu t h hhi cMmn . 

•0 UUIMl UUMSI IKOM MIH HUUtllTini 

I cm ■niiaoif M»a, m«o v.m » w um 






WINDSOR OAKS WEST 



ISl 



QUICK POSESSION 

on 5 bedroom 2 story 
Colonial. All the amenities 
included. Work shop in 
double garage. For details, 
3400000; Sherri Parkinson, 
425-9212. 

PROFESSIONAL REALTY CORP 



»»»l I duaM IWM at, imniowii •< • ipvt tomn ^fMfl - 

M rmm tinin»» m»omiliil.w» IMIM 10 tnf H i ^i fci i I 

hn* tli« (aMh mHlnm mi^ fmtnlf ••M lo •»• (fW i>"n ft»«ni««. Il»n "tm 

tat I I * tin* pfc p i il iiuliilHi to 

mmMTIONAl MAIIITIN6 SYSTIMS NK. 

I ifl«/M« MV Wt •• ' MB MMewn NWniNM N • It lOM, ■»«« 



17 For S»» ClwsajWfce 

GEORGETOWN COLONY 
Large 3 bedroom brick 
luxury home. Owner will 
iielp finance. Call Joe 
Robinson, 462 4839. We 
trade. Higgini Realty, inc., 
486 4041. {^ 

96 Wiwtwt Reri^ Estate 

CASH TALKS 

WebuySiseil Need Homes 
Cmi 464 620S Crowgey 
Realty 



# .1 



MAi^Ma^^Mi 



'^'^^^^^^^^mmmmmmm 



■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■I 



nuKp 



Racks & ricks : 
wily woodmen 

cutting tricks 

B^ Peter Weaver 

Q. We need some firewood in case our heating fuel is 
temporarily cut off. What's a fair price and viliat's the 
best way to buy it?— Mrs. D.B., Alexandria, Va. 

A. It's a sellers market, and a "fair" price is tiie best 
price you can get in your area. Prices vary all over the 
place and have Ut highs of |75 a cord (two ^cks of 
two-foot logs measuring 4 ft. by 4 ft. by 8 ft., or 128 
cubic feet). 

Always buy wood by the cord. Make sure you get 128 
cubic feet when you order a cord or 64 cubic feet when 
you order a half a cord. Don't fall for all the wily 
woodmen's measure such as a "rack" or a "rick" or 
any other od<&all names. 

Look in the {dionebook yellow pages under "wood" 
and start making some price comparisons among 
sellers. Be sure to get prices based on a cord or a 
fracti«Mn of a cord and be sure to get costs for delivery. 
Some sellers charge for "stacking" the wood but don't 
tell you this in advance. When the wood is delivei^d, 
get a yardstick and estimate the volume ox the stack to 
make sure you got what you paid for. ' 

Best kind of wood is dry, seasoned hardwood (oak, 
maple,' cherry, elm, apple). Softwood such as pine 
bums too fast. You can tell if wood is dry enough 
because the bark is falling off. Green wood has tight 
bark and smells woody around moist edges. 

Always stack wood well away from your home on 
concrete 6r brick if possible. Otherwise it could 
become infested with termites and these could get into 
your home's woodwork. 

Mina llour Money 



Q. I have squeaky floor in my house and would like to 
cmrect it without going through the expense of getting 
a new floor installed. Is there anything I can do?— G.S., 
Redding, Calif. 
A. Squeaky floors, accorduig to the National 
. Association of Home Builders, are usiially caused by 
loose floor boards. If you can get under the floor 
throu^ a basement or crawl space and have someone 
walk over the floor, you can mark the areas that 
squeak. You can put pieces of wood into the cracks 
between the floor and the beams. Or, you might be able 
to roll up your carpet and naU down the loose boards. 
Either way, you'll save hundreds of dollars. A new 
floor is quite costly. 

Q. I'm tryhig to get the best gasoline mileage for my 
car, and I'm confused by the octane ratings they're 
posting on the gas pumps. Have they lowered the 
quality of the gasoline? The octane numbers are 
lower.— R.H. Richmond, Va. 

A. The gasoline is the same. It's just the 
method of computing the octane rating 
that's different. You're used to seeing advertisements 
Mgiving octane ratings based on a "research method" 
iDomputatlOn. The^CoStdf living Council, however, 
requires gas stations to post octane ratings based on an 
average figure of the "research" and "motor" 
method. 

Your best bet is to set the lowest octane gasoline 
(recommended in your owner's manual) and stick with 
it. If you're getting a gasoline that's too low on octane 
. for your car, the engine will "ping." Mix in a little 
higher rated gasoline the next time (half rt^ular, half 
medium-price, for example). With gasoline prices 
soaring, yoU'U save money this way. 



King Features 
Syndicate, Inc., 1974. 



EvmrnHA 

REALTY 



FOR ALL YOUR 
ftEAL ESTATE 
NEEDS 



4810955 



1413 N. Great Neck Rd. 
Virginia Beach, Va. 23454 



PLANNING TO SELL 
YOUR HOME? 
PRICE IT RIGHT! 

Call us for the ptofeisional 
seivice you uc looidng fot. 

JOHNM. 
WRIGHT 

REALTY, INC. 

I964LASKINRD. 
VA. BEACH, VA. 
425-8702 

Membtn of Realtors MLS 



^^¥^: 



*# 




;k^^ 






its. 



O*^' 



runnii 

ffiin, 

ttCNTS o« 










nemodeliftg? 




4^ 



Whatever You Need, 
We'H Do It R^htl 

Add a porch, panel a room or 
install new picture windows? 
You can count on us for o job 
well done. We're ixpertil 

Bonded ami traurad 
FOR HOME IMPROVEMENTS 
OF ALL TYPES - — 
EAGLENUT CONSTRUCTION CO. 



mrm |iM*fl||1V{! 



CALL 

486-7527 



^^^r^inia Beadi Re J Estate 

lUliere The LiyiA9 1/ LoYely 

Jr'inanC^BusineSs/EcOnOinyThirSunHMKlrwKlay. Januiry 9. 1974-Pa9e 1 ] 



Tourist-related businesses 
increase volume statewide 



Travelers find a rush to bus 
in getting from here to there 



ries 



We're going to see a 
dramatic "changing of the "■ 

wheels" throughout m4 a|.||^ y^^ ^ ^^ ^^ ^^^ ^^ ^ ,^^ 
more and more of us are ^ 



forced to switch from 
personal transportation to 
public transportation. 

After the airlines cut off 
short-haul, fuel-consuming 
flights, some communities 
will find that buses are the 
only sure way out of town. 
Many bus companies are 
already crammed to 
capacity during peak 
hours. 

Local transit buses, 
wherever they exist, will 
start getting passengers 
they've never seen before 
(car commuters). With 
our airline wings clipped 
and personal wheels 
restricted, the rush to 
buses might reach frantic 
proportions this year. 

You're., advised to grab 
local transit and inter-city 
bus schedule for your 
home transportation file. 
Wherever possible, play 
your local and long- 
distance trips around these 
schedules. 

YOU MAY HAVE TO 
combine modes of tran- 
sportation. T^i-avellers 
don't go from one'teiteinal 
to another. They travel 
from home to work, from 
work to another office out 
of town and back home 
again. You may have to use 
a variety of local transit, 
inter-city bus, train, plane 
and other combinations. 



consumer columnist Peter Weaver tells how to cope with the 
energy shortage tmdfhe resulting tnmsportation firoblems. 



When you start looking, 
into inter-city bus 
schedules, you'll find that, 
with rare exceptions, there 
are no reservations. Ffa'st 
come, first served. If you 
have to change buses in 
some distant city, there's 
no assurance you can get a 
seat (especially during 
peak hours). 

You'U also find that the 
inter-city bus driver has a 
seatbelt but passengers are 
not provided with this 
proven safety device. 
Seatbelts will be put in 
buses when passengers 
begin to demand them. 

There's another surprise 
for first time or infrequent 
bus travellers. You can't 
use credit cards to pay for 
tickets. You have to come 
to the bus terminal and pay 
cash on the barrelhead for 
your tickets. This is most 
inconvenient and could 
even be dangerous for 
passengers who must come 
to an isolated terminal, 
with cash, after dark. 

Most companies will 
accept bank cashier's 
checks, money orders and 
travellers checks if you 
have plenty of iden- 
tification. 



Realty board to hold 
installation banquet 



The annual installation 
banquet of the Virginia 
Beach Board of Realtors 
will be held Jan. 18 at the 
conference center of the 
Mariner Motor Hotel, 57th 
Street and Oceanfront. 

Cocktails will be served 
at 6:30 P.M. and dinner at 
7:45 P. M., with dancing to 
Jap Currie and his or- 
chestra beginning at 9:30 



P.M. 

James S. Watkinson, 
president of the Vkgima 
Assn. of Realtors, will 
install new officers and 
directors. 

Attendance is by ticket 
only , and reservations 
must be made by Friday. 
Reservations may be made 
by telephoning the Board of 
Realtors office at 428-3802. 




CONGRATULATIONS 
T0N0.1! 

D.A. "JIM MEYER 
Top Salesman 
for December 



ESTES 

REALTY CORP. 

499-761 1 

4565 Virginia Beach Blvd. 



Member 
Realtors 
MLS 



RENT BEAUTIFUL 
NEW FURNITURE 




WITH 
PURCHASE OPTION 



iin owr tfwwroemt. yeult dteotvcr the convenient •conomicat 
wty to 9iv« yow apoi^ncnt ttisf ptrionol lodch. Wide ctwic* 
oi stylet •»! acxciwrifi. including TVs. pklurtt, cvpttt, 
h*rs end boohcnet Rent trs ttie Itnn or cempleti apart 
ment Complex 3 room groups trom$22psr.montti free 
delivory on 12 month lftas«s. 




J^ETROLe>^ 



4995 OevcUnd St., Virginia Beadt, Va. 
Rione (804M99-988i 




FREE ESTIMATES 

• Kitchens • Family Roomt 
•Bedrooms • Convert 

Oarages, 

'^ii^ 545^13 

iMBawspace to ywMf oome >■•■••■■••▼•»• •»- 
ymirhomc: Hake your hoone oon coeifor^te Mid 
eoiwntont by addi^ a rooiii...DM't Watt..CALL NJBI 








James Kerrigan, 
president of Greyhound 
Bus Lines, says "We'd loye 
to offer credit card servio», 
computerized reservattons 
and other amenities, but 
we can't afford it.. .The 
government (federal and 
local) spends money on 
airports and trains 
(Amtrak), why can't we 
get some help?" 

Some bus operators are 
ordering new buses an<) are 
keeping the old ones' in- 
stead of trading them \n.' 
Why? You guessed it. Like 
everything else, there's a 
shortage of buses and bus 
manufacturing capacity. 

The speed inter-city 
buses travel is important. 
If buses are limited to 50 or 
55 miles per hour they 
might not be able to handle 
the passenger load. To 
attract passengers ^*l^ay 
from more wasteful modes 
of transportation (auto and 
air), buses should be able 
to go 60 miles per hour. 



When businessmen, 
politicians and othM* people 
with dout suddenly have to 
ride buses, then you might 
see an upgrading of. the 
seirvice from a reservation 
system on up to better ibd 
ihore conveniently located 
terminals. 



Hotds, motor hotds and 
motels in Virginia did 
almost $299 miUlon worth 
of bushiess in 1972, an in- 
crease of 12 per cent in 
dollar volume of business 
since 1967, acoirding to the 
1972 cerous of selected 
service industries in the 
state. 

The 1972 data, rep(Hrted 
by the Bureau of the 

Insurance 
agency 

formed 

The newly formed 
Insurance Services of 
Virginia Beach, Inc. 
(ISVB), a general in- 
surance agency, has 
opened its offices at 968 S. 



Census, coven a wide 
variety of personal and 
business servicea in the 
state, induding hotels and 
motds, personal servteas, 
business services, 
automotive services, 
miscellaneous repair 
service*, amusement and 
recreation services and 
profeisiMwl services, such 
as dental, legal, ar- 
chitectural and 
oigineering services. 






The (jbita for 1972 was 
recently reported by the. 
Bureau at the Census. 

The state's 8^ hotels, 
motor hotels and motels 
had payrolls totalling 
almost $62 million for 1972. ' 
The state's 961 hotels, 
motels, trailer parks and 
campgrounds realised a 
business volume of 1239 
miUlon and had payrolls 
totalling $63 million for 
1972. 



— ^Oriole Drive. 



' Meanwhile, try ' hot ~to 
travel during major 
holidays. Get your 
schedules in hand and start 
plotting: "How do we get 
from here to there in the 
best time, for the best 
price, and sAth our hides in 
one piece?" 

Khig Features 
Syndicate, Inc., 1974. 



' Officers , of the new 
agency are Thomas C. 
Kyrus, president; Samuel 
W. Scott, secretary and 
David Cassida, treasurer. 
Ms. Doris L. Lewis has 
been named manager of 
tiie agmcy. She brings 16 
years experience in the 
insurance business to her 
new position. 





HOW 
INUCH 
DO YOUR 
UTILITIES 
COST 

PAY' 

ONE 

BILL 

AT 

REGENCY 

ALL UTILITIES 
INCLUDED! 
SEE OUR FURNISHED 
MODEL 

R^ency 

alNIUTOr 

1,2,&3 bedroom 
, Apartments, 
Townhouses, 
Garden and Bachelor. 

LASKIN ROAD AT 
HILLTOP 
PHONE; 428<SM 



SEU.ING...RENTING...BUYING...TRADING 

YouH Do Bettw With. 

BISSEH REALTY JNC. 

"A Respected Name In Real Estate" 

Thalia Shopping Center 
4316 Virginia Beach Blvd. 
Virginia Beach, Va. 23452 

Mike Vance, GRI 340-7000 Lowell Powers, 420-3802 
Jack Bissett, GRI 340-6626 Lee O'Men S40-4084 
Rose Bissett. GRI 840-9898 Ron Gregory 497-9535 



Omtt 340-9721 



To buy, sell or trade your 

home, call us right now. 
We can give you quick results! 

CALL 340-83 11 

. Fr«d Sol«t. Mgr. 

9 2>*JJa.t f^.ailf 



e 



Oanaral Raai EttMi 
1 16 London Bridge Shopping Canter 
Vlr^nls Beach, Va. 




Old Doijatioq, 

GARDEN APARTMENTS 

New and Lovely In Park-Like Surroundings 
1 & 2 BEDROOMS NOW LEASING 



Beautiful spacloui rooms, fully 

carpeted, with ample dosets 

big eat-in-kitchens with outside windows 

large storage urea in each apartment 

individual entnncet 

front door parkli^ 

clow to ihopplng 

Off Independence Blvd. on Honey Grove Rd. 
AcrtMs from H«ygood Shopping Centor fai 
Beautiful Old Donation If anor 

CAli46(M)92t 



OOT ^^^ 




PROBLEMS? ^^/M) 






Trying to - v^^^^# 




fix up ■■'^''P^li^^m'' 


> 


your home? ( (^f^nu lOjwf .'^ 




Want ' v^ f ImI^' 




to increase 1/^ 




its re-sale 




value? Want to buy, sell, or rent a 




, jew/hprne or apartment? Then "Cliff" 




Clifton is your man! For all your 




maintenance problems, and also all your 




real estate and insurance needs, 




call now - 




490-2315 


■ 


CLARAtON REAL ESTATE 




a INSURANCE AGENCY, 




CORP. 




o/so 




CLIFF'S REPAIRS, INC. 




505'A N. WITCHDUCK RD. 





HOME SERVICE — REPAIR GUIDE 




mm^^ 



USE THIS HANDY UP TO DATE ALPHABETICALLy USTTO 




Additions-Remodeling 



GUIDE FOR AU YOUR SERVKE Nra>SI 

Electrical Contractor - Home Improvements 



Locksmiths 



ADDITIONS- 
REMODELING 
Free Estimates 
Home repairs of ail types. 

Bonded and Insured 

EAGLENUT 
CONSTRUCTION CO. 

486-7527 



ELECTRICM. MfORK 

Bectric heat and (faysn; 
houses rtwfred. 
Free Bstimates 
CaU Mike Lerin^ 



Ower-M Mantoiim' 

Roof in«. tuttwing, carpen- 
try and Inlnor rapalrt. W« 
nx all thota hard to find 
faku Fraa Eftlmata*. 
OWNE R, W.J. Ollvarlut 



LOdCSkOTHCboadedl 

Im^KqiShop 

23l6Vi.lMClilM. 
Loirfaalri^ 
J.ILDotU 
340-2490 



Tile 



YOU CAN'T 
BEAT MY PRICES! 

On any Bathroom or Kitchen 
tile work. Also Acoustical 
ceilings. 

Call 5(7 1720 



Asphalt-ConcretB 





ELECTRICAL 
OONTKACTOR 



D.E. MITCHELi 
426-7262 



H0M£ HOHOVEMEMTS , 

Lumber and building miiterlals, 
room »<»dillon«, »torm doors an6 
wintHPM, wall to wall carpat, 
vinyl tiding. Fraa (Stin^lai, 
terms, 

(ELLAM*EAT(m,INC 
427-3300 



Painting 



Upholstery 



Home Improvements House & Yard Cleaning 



ASPHALT 

and 

CONCRETE 

PAVING 

ASPHALT ROAOS 

MATERIALS CO., INC. 

4985 Holland Rd. 

Virginia Beach 

Phone 497-359T 



BicydeR^Mrtrs 



l.aKft flimir Si'nttr 
Bkyck Repairs W<1diiy 
and Otnwnmtal Iron RaU- 

VA. BEACH LAWN 
MOWER A WELMriK; 
428-9029 



Carpentry 




W(K)D TEltCE 
CONTRACTOR 




SPLIT RAIL 



Kail* in 


Mrdweod. 


apruct 


and 


chatfnM* 


will all 


l«C«lt 


poat. 


SWaltad. 








Hardwood, ^miee, 




Cbestnitt 




2 RAIL 


1^ 


1.29 


L64 


3 RAIL 


1.44 


1J5 


2.00 


4RAIL 


1.79 


l.K 


2.15 



Priced par «o«t Prica InchMM 
nsNarfals antf mafaWaHan. PiIm 
MNMact to Mte* tax 

FREE ESTIMATES 
BUYRNIII6IV00D 
FARMS 



WE DO PLANTING, 

SHRUBBING, 
CLEAN GARAGES, 
GUTTERS & YARDS 

ALSO HKUL TRASH. 
isjasr 



PAINTINO 
Take advantage of the 
season! Save money on 
the cost of painting your 
home, do it now! Call 
Americati Home 
Painting Co. 4990444 
Free Estimates 
All Work Guaranteed 



uPHOLiTsey 

ANDIRSON'S UPHOI,tTIRY 

If your fumltura It tick ...bring 
H to Andarton'i Upholtlary for a 
face lifting AM work tirtt citit 

Call 464^37 



Plastering 



\nimwr Decoratii^ 



INTERIOR-EXTERIOR! 

SPECIALIST 

Guaranteed workmanship 

Special Rates for 

Senior Citizens 

FREE ESTIMATES 
497M1|(M-5I3$44« 



PLASTERING & 
STUCCO 

JohnL. Brown 

Rt I.Box 1033 

Princess Anne Rd. 

Virginia Beach 

427 23S1. 



UPHOLSTERY 
ALL Types, Fast Service, 
Reasonable prices. 
"Serving Tidewater 
for ever 3S years." 

BENDER'S CUSTOM 

SERVICE 

627 0244 



atpcrcMifOFFSALE 
ON ALL FABRICS 
Hundreds of fatjrtcs to 
choose from. We also have 
•CUSTOM DRAPERIES 
•WINDOW SHADES 
•WALLPAPER •VENE 
TIAN BLINDS 

t»-«M4 

BENDER'S CUSTOM 

r *"'^*^^ 



Rooflng 

R0OFTN6 



m 



and 
GUTTERINO 
SPECIALISTS 

Senior Citixens 
Special Rate 

S«4t or 497 

af fw4 pm 



3011 



TtR 40,000 



YttfSMMet. 

To place your id In 
this dIrMtory call 
Mrs. Afin Parker 
4M-34I3 



wm 



Mi 



Hsa la—The Sun— Wednesday, January 9, 1974 



^ 



Wesley an students to get taste of migrant living 



By DONNA HENDRICK 
Sun Staff Writer 

A Viifihia Wesleyan College professor and 23 
students will leave Friday for Florida to learn 
aboitt "one of the great tragedies of American 
life," in the words of sociology professor Dr. 
Wayne ArtJs. , 

Dr. Artis and the students will travel to a 
migrant worker camp in Altamonte Springs, 
Fla., to work in the orange groves and learn 
about the living conditions of the migrants and 
the education of the migrant children. 

The students' trip to Florida is part of a unique 
learning experience at Virginia Wesleyan known 
as the January Term. The term begins Monday 
and runs through Jan. 25 and is designed to 
provide students with opportunities to explore 
the new and untried. 

NO GRADES are given for the January Term, 



but all studoits are required to participate. Hie 
January Term was adopted in the fall of 1973 as a 
part of the college*! ^duation requiremttits. 

Students and faculty had a hand in selecting 
projects to be undertaken during the term. The 
27 courses range from instruction in how to buy 
and fumi^ a home to the^tudy of the films of 
Ingmar Etergman. 

Dr. Artis' project in Florida is entitled 
"Throw-Away Children" and is designed to 
intr«duce studeHt§ to the inhermit problems 
facing the children of migrant workers. 

AS DR. ARTIS explains the course, "many of 
the forgotten children of America today are 
members of migrant families. Our society has 
had a tendency to throw away these children and 
lock fheni into a migrant salary where their 
annual income is less than |1,500 a year." 

He said he expects the students who ac- 
company him to Florida to experience cultural 



shock when Uiey encounter the living condkloM 
of the migrant v/orlan. 

"I wmt'thMe comtetaUe, flnanclally secure, 
middle<lass Mds to be exposed personaOy to one 
of Uie great tragedies of American life," Dr. 
Artis explained. 

THE 23 STUDENT! will travel to Florida by 
ear. Tbey report to work Bfonday in the orange 
groves and will be paid the same rate as die 
migrans. 

Dr. Artis, tiirough tfie Florida Council of 
Churches, has secured the cooperation of a 
Florida grower who will anploy ithe students. 

The students will live in camping trailers at 
the orange groves but will not live in the homes 
of migrants. 

"For one thing, ihen't not enough room in the 
migrants' homes," Dr. ArtiR explained. "For 
another, most of the growers would not welcome 
this kind of interruption." 



Aftar ttw MideBtt haw wwked in the gnm» 
with the migrmits, Dr. Artis a ^n u ed Hathofe 
that the students wOl recdve Invitations to the 
migrant cainpe «iiere th^ can gaUier first-hand 
infiBinatioh on the mi§ruA lifestyle. 

lUE STt^ENTS will be divided into groups of 
five with each group raqioHtible for planning its 
own menia, purchasug its own food and cooking 
its own meals. 

Each stuctent participating in Dr. Artis' 
January Tora was required to pay $200 to cover 
tranqMrtation, food and lodging. In' addition, 
students wa% required to read several boolu on 
migrant workers over the Christmas holidays. 

Dr. Artis became inta«sted in the pSgii{ of the 
migrants when he was executive director of the 
FUiode Island State Council of Churches. 

IN RHODE ISLAND he was resprasiUe for 
insuring that minimum Iwusing standards for 



miff-ants wen maintained, that health care 
facilities were eiUUldied and that the migrant 
chiliferen were involved in the educ^ooal 
syitons of ttie state. 

Dr. Artis is an (HtUmied minister in a» 
Methodist (^urdi. He holds a Ph.D. from Bortm 
University, as w^ as bachelors and masters 
d^rees in echication. 

LAST-^SUMMER be led an mtoura^ of 
students to Israal whrae they worked ip potato 
fidds on a kiblNite. During last year's Vhrginia 
Wesl^an Commrni Leamii^ Experience (the 
forerunner of the January Term), he intnxtaiced 
students to the problems of aging by lecturing on 
gerontology and taUog-them to old age homes. 

"These kids will never look at the world 
through the same pair of eyes a^fai," he said. 
"They will feel a twinge in thefa- consciences. 
They will have a germ of an ictea that thii^ can 
be changed. Iliat germ will grow, but it will be a 
k>ng-term thing." -_' : 



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This week's • 
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49th Year No. 3 




"1 



^^ ^% *^. ^ t -f ^ fi"_'^"nr''^'r 



Economy 



State growth 
steady in '73 



By DONNA HENDRICK 
Sun Staff Writer 

Virginia's economy continued to show steady growth 
during 1973 and surpassed the growth of the national 
economy in many instances. 

In a report issued by the division of industrial 
development of the Commonwealth of Virginia, the state 
showed ?^low and relatively stable unemployment rate as 
compared to a higher national rate. 

Virginia's unemployment rate of 2.7 per cent for 1973 
was a slight decrease from the 1972 level. The national 
unemployment rate for the year-averaged 4.9 per cent, the 
first time in two years that the national unemployment 
rate fell below five per cent. 

VIRGINIA MARKED a record year for industrial 
development with over 19,000 new manufacturing jobs 
anni^qeced. The tourist industry in the state also made 
significant gains, and the agricultural segment of the 
economy continued to grow. ' 

liie state's population as of July was estimated at 
4,811,000 by the U.S. Census Bureau. The figure includes 
api;m>nmately 146,000 members of the armed forces. The 
state's ctvilian population increased 1.2 per cent during 
the year, as compared to a national gain of less than one 
per cent. 

The state's population growth rate, however, continued 
to decline, matching a national trend in declining growth 
due to the falling birth rate. 

Real gain in personal income for the state was ap- 
proximately three per cent. Although personal income 
increased 11 per cent over last year, inflation reduced the 
effects of the growth. The state's increase in personal 
income matched the national increase. 

THE UNEMPLOYMENT rate of the Norfolk-Ports- 
mouth area, as reported in October by the Virginia 
Employment Commission, was exactly the same at the 
statewide unemployment rate. The 2.7 per cent rate, well 
below the national average, is matched by a 2.7 unem- 
ployment rate in the Newport News-Hampton area. The 
state employment commission reported on 16 labor 
markets in Virginia. 

Liken Inc.'s announcement that it will establish a $5 
million manufacturing firm in Virginia Beach was one of 
11 announcemraits by firms establishing investments of $5 
miUiop or more in the state. Volvo of America Corp. will 
build «^ $100 million plail in Chesapeake and Mi^or Gas, 
Oil & Refining Corp. will build a $33 million plant in the 
same city. Both Chesapeake firms are expected to employ 
many residents of both Virginia Beach and Norfolk. 

The federal government .continued, to be one of the 
largest employra^ in Vironia during 1973, although 
military personnel statioiwd in the state declined. 
Military personnel stationed in Virginia should average 
146,000 for the year. This is a decline of 7,000 persons, or 
4.6 per ceit, a much greater loss rate than the national 
military decline of .9 per cent. 

IN ADDITION TO military personnel, approximately 
154,000 civilians were employed by the federal govern- 
ment in the state during 1973. 

Latest complete figures indicate that the civilian 
portion of the federal payroll accounts for about 12 per 
cent of all personal income received by Virginians. The 
manufacturing sector of the state produces about 14.1 per 
cent of the personal income. The military segment con- 
tributes 6.4 per cent of the state's total personal income. 

Despite problems with fuel shortages, Virginia's 
tourist industry continued to grow. Virginia Beach showed 
a 20.6 per cent increase over last year in food, lodging and 
admission receipts, with receipts totalled through 
November. Colonial Williamsburg experienced a 16.7 per 
cent gain through November. Mount Vemon visits were 
up six per crait. Traffic through the Chesapeake Bay 
Bridge-Tuinel was up 18.5 per cent, and visits to the 
state's national parks grew 7.1 per cent. 

- THE STATEWIDE tourist industry reported a 6.9 per 
cent growth rate through November, a rate substantially 
higher than previous yearS. 

Employment in hotel-motel establishments 
increased seven per cent in 1973, with a total of 
21,300 employed by hotels and motels. Last year's em- 
ptoymmt gain was 4.7 per cent. Statewide, approximately 
$100 million was spent for construction of new tourist 
establishments in 1973. The record figure is 46 per cent 
more than last year's $68.9 million. 

The past year can be summed up as one of the best for 
the state's agricultural industry in quite some time. 
Estimates are that Virginia's cash receipts from 
marketings of crops and livestock will reach a new record 
of more than $840 million for the year, a figure ap- 
proximately $180 million above last year. 

TOTAL CASH receipts for all crops will average 31 per 
cent over last year, while livestock cash receipts will 
average 27 per cent over 1972. However, higher production 
costs partially offset increases in both areas of the state's 
agricultural industry. 

Higher prices were received for all major crops and 

prodiKtion increases for com, sorghum grain, soybeans, 

' peanuts, sweet potatoes, cotton and tobacco contributed to 

the growth of the agricultural segment of the economy. 

The stale's leading ca^ crop, tol)acco, set a record by 
selling for more than $120 million. ProdiKtion of peanuts, 
the number two cash crop, increased by 13 per cent with 
cash receipts up 16 per cent over 1972. Soybean production 
was up 23 per cent for a cash receipt gain of 91 per cent 
and com production increased seven per cent. However, 
small grain production (wheats, oats and barley) 
decreased nine per coit. 

ALTHOUGH APPLE and potato production was less 
than in 1972, both received increases of 40 per cent in 
receipts due to hi^er prices. 

Meat animals and poultry ^owed the largest gains, 
while livestock and poultry producers realized a 27 per 
c«Jt increase in receipts. Milk production was down two 
per cent and egg prodirction down five per cent. However, 
gross inrome from milk gain^ 10 pw cent and ^gs 
gained 35 per cent over last year. 
. Although the 1973 crop season started with wet soil and 
frequent rain, the weather lm|Ht>ved enough duing May 
to pirt farm activities ob scheuise. ranners ^ojo^wu one oi 
the best late summ«- and fall seasons in sev««l y^rs. 

CORN WAS STILL being plants! at the b^inning of 
June Iwt had made excellent progress and was in the 
sHked stage in Tidewater by the first «rf At^tnt. Own 
harv«Mta« was well uoder way by Sq>t«nb«-. 




23 n 9 



Vt ^^"^^ 



U pdate 



^iS0t0lk:ial edition 



City Of Virginia Beacli, Va. 



Wednesday^ January 16, 1974 



V 



(^Copyii^t, 1974 
BMch PubUihlngCqi^ 



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HE 



Plaza area may get 
$2.5 million center 



Firemen fight shop blaze 



Only minor damage was reported 
Saturday afternoon as fire broke out 
in a suspended gas-fired heater unit 
at Hillti^ Volkswagon on Laskin 
Road. Bob Rodriquez of the Oceana 
Volunteer Fire Dept. quickly 



extinguished the fire with carbon 
dioxide. Cause of the fire, which 
broke out shortly after closing of the 
auto service §'hop, was not 
immediately determined. (Sun 
photo by Lou Roberts) 



Councilmen support ERA 



Equal ri^ts for women? The 
Virginia Beach City Council 
said yes Monday as they 
became the first Tidewater 
area city, and perhaps the first 
city in the state, to pass a 
resolution in support of the 
Equal Rights Amendment. 
(ERA). 

Though Vera Henderson, 
president of the Virginia Beach 
Chapter of the National 
Organization for Women 
(NOW), was armed and ready 
to answer any questions the 
council might have, the 
resolution passed unanimously 
with little fanfare. Ms. Hen- 
derson siad when she first asked 
the council to pass the 
resolution at the Jan. 2 council 
session, she was not sure they 
would act favorably on the 
matter. %e' was surprised by 
Monday's unanimous vote. "I 
think the more people know 
about the ERA, though, the 



more they are for it, and I'm 
glad to see that the council gave 
it consido-ation," Ms. Hen- 
derson said. 

Ms. Henderson said she felt 
the council's vote indicated 
"they believe there is support 
for the ERA in their boroughs." 

(Although he voted for the 
resolution, Dr. Clarence 
Holland said he wasn't "sure 
the ladies were going to be 
happy with what they ended up 
with." And Councilman Curtis 
Payne told the council that 
although his wife told him to 
vote against it, he would also 
vote aye.) 

Representatives of the 
Virginia Beach Chapter of NOW 
will be among other women's 
groups traveling, to Richmond 
Thursday for a legislative 
breakfast sponsored by the 
Congress of Woman's 
Organizations. The "lobbying" 



breakfast will be an effort to get 
the support of state legislators 
for the ERA. Virginia Beach 
representatives to the General 
Assembly have already voiced 
support of the amendment. 

Ms. Henderson says she has 
"high expectations" that the 
amendment will pass the 
(General Assembly this year. 



Gardner may present 
growth control plan 



Growth control has become a 
favorite topic among Virginia 
Beach City Councilmen, and 
Councihnan Charles Gardner 
wittiin the next month hopes to 
{H'esait a land use plan to the 
council that will prohibit 
developers from obtaining 
building permits until city 
services can meet the demands 
of the proposed development. 

Mr. Gardner, who has been 
pushing for some kind of growth 
controls for the city, helped 
arrange a trip last week for city 
officials to Fairfax County, Va., 
to discuss that county's ap- 
proach to "orderly growth with 
a>unty officials." Five coun- 
cilmen (Murray Malbon, 
Garland Isdell, John Baton, Dr. 



Esttfclished in. 



Clarence Holland and Mr. 
Gardner), four planning 
commissioners (Sam Houston, 
Jane Purrington, Everett Irby 
and Bailey T. Parker) and City 
Manager Roger Scott were 
among the Virginia Beach city 
officials to make the trip. 

FairfayCounty is considering 
adopting^ a land use system 
similar j[ to onej eW^in use in 
Ramapo, N.Y., which lets the 
builder "earn" a building 
permit on a point system. Ihe 
more city services available, 
like water and sewer, the more 
points the builder would 
receive. WhCT he reached a 
sufficient numb«, he W}uld be 
issued a buildng permit. 

1925 



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Closed 
council 

The Virginia Beach City 
Council met Monday for 37 
minutes in closed session, 
open to neither the public 
nor the press. The agenda 
listed the only item for 
discussion as a "lepl — 
financial matter." This 
brings the total amount of 
time behind closed doors 
Ihb year to one hour and 
nine minutes. 



Plans are undelwayf-Jar 
residents ef ffil> Pirincess Anne 
Plaza area of the city to get a 
$2.5 million community center 
designed to, serv« 50,000 people 
of the area. 

The center will contain 
facilities for family-type 
recreation, including a 
gymnasium, swimming pool, ' 
small theatre, crafts room, 
areas for teaching various types 
of recreation classes, large 
meeting rooms for meetings of 
civic leagues and other groups, 
facilities for the handicapped 
and meeting areas for senior 
citizens. 

Harold Whitehurst, director 
of the city's parks and 
recreation department, told 
members of the perks and 
recreation commission at last 
week's meeting that the 
Virginia Beach architectural 
firm of McClurg and Wall will 

Griffin to 
join race 

for council 

Promising to seek a 
moratorium on building to allow 
city services to catch up with 
public demand, if elected, John 
R. Griffin Monday became the 
third person to announce his 
candidacy for a seat on the 
Virginia Beach City Council. 

Mr. Griffin says he feels "the 
new n>ning laws which were 
supposed to provide forordtfly 
develapraent and |trep«r land 
use have left our city without 
any viaf^le {dm, and as a result, 
we have a hodgepodge of 
business, single family and 
multifai)nily" buildings 
throughout the city. Mr. Griffin 
proposes a study of the city's 
present and future needs during 
the moratorium. 

A resident of Lynnhaven 
Borough, Mr. Griffin has not 
decided whether he will seek the 
borough seat or one of two at- 
large seats up fbr grabs. He is 
an investment broker with Legg 
Mason and Co. Inc. 

A FORMER newsman 
(general manager of The Sun 
from 1968 to 1971 and WTAR 
director of 'news and public 
affairs from 1962 to 1967), Mr. 
Griffin says he is "strongly 
opposed" to closed council 
sessions, unless it is a matter 
explicitly covered under the 
Freedom of Information Act 
(FOI). Mr. Griffin served on 
Virginia's first broadcaster's 
FOI committee pushing for FOI 
legislation in 1968. 



begin drawing preliminary 
plans for the center. 

CITY COUNCIL has 

appropriated funds to retain the 
firm, and the architects plan to 
look at community centers in 
other cities before drawing up 
preliminary plans. 

James K. Cole, recreation 
s^pervisor, said that the center 
is tentatively planned at Plaza 
Park, a 28-acre city park off 
Holland Road 

Although no target date for 
completion of the building has 
been set. Oral Lambert, general 
services director, said that 
plans for the building should be 
completed in fiscal year 1974-75 
with corotructlon to begin in 
fiscal year 1976-77, 

However, Mr. Lambert 
indicated that the communify 
center enjoys a high-priority 
slot in the city's five-year 



capital improvements plan and 
may be completed even "sooner 

ALTH0U6H THJI cg^ of the 

building is estimated to be 
around $2.5 million, Mr. 
Lambert said that the cost may 
vary considerably since the 
project is still in. the 
preliminary design stage. 

McClurg and Wall will 
receive approximately six per 
cent of the total cost of the 
project,' to be paid in 
increments when preliminary 
drawings and construction 
plans are completed. 

When the preliminary 
architectural design plans are 
finished, they will be reviewed 
by members of the city's 
recreation department, general 
services department and city 
manager's office. The city 
manager will then submit the 
plans to city council for 
approval. "^ 




— -Update 

Thii week's special iiaue of The Sun looks back- 
ward to the year 1973. Sun editors, staff writers and 
photographers review the major events of the year 
and how those events helped shape Vb-gbila Beach 
hi government, economy, education, growth, sports 
and many other areas. This update Issue not only 
details what happened, but also offers perspectives 
for future trends. Highlights of the update Issue 
are: 

Tht year In rsvitw .........A-2 

City councH update. -A^ 

Growth summary.... > cA*! 

Pisnnififl uposio.«........«jn«wiw « « « »»«>'»«'»"«»»""•'»«*"** 

Education wi^ti..„.... A-6 

Military updSts... A-« 

The ntw regional airport A'7 

The year in pictures A-10 

Sports update B-1 

A year of service B-14,1 5 



Cooler schools out; 
walking students in 




GRIFFIN 



students in Virginia Beach 
schooli may not have to shiver 
throu^ the rest of the winter 
after all. 

Although the Virginia Bei(ch 
School Board Tuesday 
unanimously adopted certain 
energy-saving measures 
recommended last month by a 
school conservation committee, 
the board failed to-^dopt a 
recommendation to lower 
daytime school tempera hires to 
the 65-68 degree range. 

School thermostats will 
cmitinue to be set in Uie 68-72 
degree range, as directed in 
November by the school 
administration. 

The board adopted five of 15 
energy-saving methods 
recommended by the 
conservation committee. 
Among these was a 
recommendation that walking 
zwtes be established b| all 
schools and any existing 
walking zones be expended. 

Besides walking more, 
students also will be urged to 
serve on energy-conservation 
committees in each school. The 
COTnmittees also will Incluite 
faculty members. 

Other measures adopted 
Tuesday incltjde 
recommendations that: 



• the schod boaf-d make all 
efforts on the state and national 
level to see that the schools are 
given official priority In 
receiving gasdlne and other 
fuels; 

• the school board request 
city council to sponsor an 
energy-saving campaign 
appealing to the general 
citizenry, business and 
industry; 

•night cut-back 
temperatures of 60-^ degrees 
be maintained in gymnasiums 
during non-school sponsored 
recreational programs. 

In other school board business 
Tuesday, Dr. Brickell reported 
on results of the 1973 fall testing 
program for grades one through 
six conducted in March. 

The gene^ ability level of 
the studefiST a8~mea8ured by 
the sufndardized Scholastic 
Test df Educational Ability, 
exceeded or met the national 
average in all grades except 
fourth grade, which m^sured 
five per cent below the national 
average, and sixth grade, which 
was one per cent below. 

Dr. Brickell indicated that the 
overall test scores are generally 
considered good and the scwes 
are "alright in terms of the 
standards of quality." 



Planners elect Parker chairman 




ifl»(/un 



We are proud to have been a part of the City 
of Vir^ia Beach for 49 fear$. See pqges B-4 aruT 
B-S for other busineues offering another year of 



service. 



Meeting in closed session last week, the 
Virginia Beach Planning Commission 
elected Bailey T. Parker Jr. as chairman, 
succeedit^ J. Harry Mote, who served as 
chairman for three years. 

Also elected in the closed session, which 
preceded llie commission's regular 
meetii^, were R. Dean Lee as vice- 
chairman and R. L. "BiKldy" Rigp as 
secretary. 

The planning commission was re- 
shuffled last month when new city council 
appointees to the commission v/ere made. 
Roy DeHart, Walter Pankiewicz and Roy 
Alphin were tnt re-aRwinted to the 
commissiwi. Their seats were filled by 
Jane Purrington, the first woman to serve 
on the (»mmission, James L. McKown Jr. 
and Everett Irby. 

IN ADDITION. Sam Ifotuton Sr., past 
president of the Council of CiviQ 
Organizations, was named to rei^ce tN 
late Arthur Jurgeisoi. 

Mr. Mice's fcHff-year term as a com- 
misswner has not expired, ami he win 
continue to sit m the commtekxi. TIm 



commisston elects 6fficen annually each 
January. 

During the commission's regular 
s«Hk>n, it recomm«K)ed: 

Denial of a zoning change that wouM 
have aUowed Wedgewood Building Corp. 
to construct a 104-room hotel with pool and 
related restawant oa 1.91 acres of land off 
NorthampUw Boulevard in the Dianwnd 
Uke Estates^area of Bayside boroi«h. 

Denial of a zoning change that wwild 
have allowed Robort D. Ruffin Jr. to 
construct a shof^ing center at the old egg 
factory m N(»1liampton Boulevard n^u- 
9iell Road in the Mjo Farms area of 
Bayside BoroDgh. 

A{q>roval of three B»>taig ^ai^n 
allowing Commonwealth Finandti Corp. 
to construct a maximum of 446 toi^Mnwi 
for sale and a self-^mtalned sht^riig 
coiter on 52 acTM on either side itf Genoral 
Boirth Boi^vard tma South Binfaiedc 
Road. 

A^KOval <a fliree swing chanf^ 
allowing Ms. E. S. Garcia to bidM ap- 



proximately 700 townhouses and single- 
family homes on 133 acres near the in- 
lersectkin of Colony Drive and London 
Bridge Road in the Colony Acres area of 
Princess Anne Borough. 

Ai^nroval of a change of zoning 
allowli4 Diamond Springs Corp. to btdld 
106 apartment units on 5.23 acres near the 
Airport Imfaatrial Park on Diamond 

SpriRSfi Road ami Ara^na Boulevard in 
Bayskle Uoroi4pt. 

An>roval of a zoning change to allow 
11 petitioners to build a maximtan of 1% 
townhoines or apartments on 10.7 acres 
near Independence Boulevard and 
Pleasure House Road in the Rot>bins 
Comer area of BaysiJfe Borou^. 

In addition, the commission <tef erred for 
90 days actiw on four zoning ciiange 
rec^wMs fw land on the Clwsapeake 
tayfront. aty council rec«iUy impoa«l a 
•0-day moratorium on bayfront 
devdopment to allow the cMnptetim of a 
plannbig d^artmwjt stwJy of the hMvUy 




Page A-2-The Sun-Wedmiday, danuary 16, 1974 



During best and worst of times: we hung in tliere 




ByNEALSIMS 
Sun Editor 

Oiaracterfee 1973, the lOth year of lifef for tee 
world's iargest resort city, as a year of honors, a 
year of be^nings and a year of controversy. 

During its 12 months, Virginia Beach, a city with 

boundle^ potential, Combined imagination with 
resources, taking major steps toward progressive 
goals. A commuter express and an information 
"Hotline" were begun, and the city dump was 
turned into a planned playground. The year had its 
flat moments too, with the city council meeting 
weekly behind closed doors and defeating a 
resolution calling for finani^al disclosure by city 
officials. 

The city took time out from its pace to welcome 
home some special old friends and to greet 
thousands of tourists in the summer. And 
throughout it all, the prices of food and gasoline 
went up as their supply ran down. 

THE YEAR OPENED with a chill, and by Jan. 8, 
a four-inch snow had virtually shut dov?n the city 
for a day. Banks and schools were closed, as 
drivers and bicyclists tested their abiflties at 
negotiating ice-slick roads. 

The first controversy of the year arose on Jan. 15, 

Wiyside 

By Linda MUer 

Patience is key 
to public hearing 



If you've never been to a public hearing at the 
Virginia Beach City Council chambers, you don't 
know what you have missed. 

The chambers, which will seat only about 155 
persons, just aren't large enough to accommodate 
the mass of emotional citizens who turn out when 
they are upset about something the council is doing 
"of not doing. And granted, if I were a citizen who 
had taken off work to go down to the city council 
meeting at 2 p.m., I might be a little perturbed if I 
ended up standing in the corridor outside the 
council chambers. But is it necessary to nearly kill 
your neighbor Itecause he happens to be leaning 
against the wall and you're stuck in the middle of 
the hall? 

Fortunately for me, as a member of the press, I 
have a reserved ring-side seat for all the council 
sessions — even when no one but the press bothers 
to show up. Trying to get through the crowd of some 
200 citizens in the hall and battle my way to the door 
of the chambers at the Jan. 7 hearing was more 
than I could bear. Besides, I wasn't sure I could 
convince the fire marshal guarding the dopr that I 
really t)elonged in there, if I ever made it to the 
door. (When I get in a crowd like that, I have an 
urge to let out a Iwid Moo-oo-oo. ) I just gave up and 
creeped into the chambers the back way, the way 
the councilmen come into the chamber — through 
the door that looks Uke a part of the wall behind the 
councilmen's chairs.' 

The whole public hearing affair is hectic for all 
concerned — especially if any of the speakers get 
windy. One has to have a little compassion for those 
who stood patiently in the hall for nearly three 
hours waiting to speak what was on their minds. 
But, iV§ the only way for the average citizen to 
voice his opinion. Perhaps one lady put it best when 
she told the council, "waiting out there in the hall to 
talk to you gentlemen is truly a labor of love." 

Rough as it may be, it would probably be a good 
experience for all members of the Beach 
population. 

PEOPLE IN the Beach have been talking about 
how the energy crisis may hurt the tourist season, 
but no one seems to be doing much about it. Russell 
Chaplain appeared at last week's council session 
with a suggestion. 

Mr. Chaplain proposed that the city ask the 
federal government for additional gasoline allot- 
ments. He explained that a few weeks ago Vice- 
president Gerald Ford told the nation that tourism 
should be considered along with other industries 
which will be asking for extra gasoline alloUnents 
to survive. 

The Chaplain family is building a new hotel at the 
beach and no doubt, like other hotel owners, they 
would like to protect their business. But, Mr. 
Chaplain is the first of those hotel owners to come 
forth with a concrete idea for a solution. 

SEVERAL BEACH attorneys were oMifused 
whorit came to addressing Uie Virginia Beach 
Planning Commission last week. It seems old 
habits are hard to break. 

Most of those appearing before the commission 
began by saying, "gaitlemen," or "gentlemen of 
the ^nunission." 

It took a while for some of them to notice ttiat one 
new member of the commission, Jane Purrington, 
is not a goitleman. 




yvn 

An Indepen^nt New$paper 



OAVIOaOCAR 



WAL MUTTON SUtS^ 
iMmr 



^JNOnAIXAOLOAKCn MATT)«W WBSON 



JAMES C. B80«H« 

Ctoiktioit Dii9^ 



KA04 nMLISMING COM>OIIATtON 
^■pOH •«c*i. Vw^Mt 234K 



In retrospect: 1973 



when Cmmcilman Charles Gardner introduced 
before city council an ordinance pn^ibitiiq; topless 
dancifig ia the Beach. That same day Rdbert 
Whittey, 'fipurist development coordinator, 
predicted that the year would be the best ever for 
tourism and said the city would stress its image as 
a "family resort." When the ordinance wentjinto 
effect on Feb. 6, an injunctioi agains't its 
enforcement was immediately filed by Jamaica 
Inn, where topless go-go dancers had been 
performing. 

In February, Algy Cohen was named Fu^t 
Citizen by the Jaycees, but the month also marked 
the return of the ex^POWs. On Feb. 21, a crow<| 
gathered at Norfolk Naval Air Station (NAS) to 
welcome home two Beach residents who had been 
held captive by the North Vietnamese, the crowd 
sang "Grod Bless America," "America the 
Beautiful" and "Onward Christian Soldiers" to hail 
the arrival of Jeremiah A. Dentm and James A. 
Mulligan. 

DURING THE first week of March, the long- 
await^ Comprehensive Zoning Ordinance was 
released by the planning department, and the 
challenges immediately b^an. Joseph Canada and 



S.J. "Joe" Smith annmmced their candidacy for 
the offices of state senator and sheriff of Virginia 
Qeach, respectively. And four ,mQre ex-POWs 
rmimed, Allen C. Brady, Eugene B. McDaniel, 
Michael Christian and John Fellowes. 

Also in March, Dr. E.E. Brickell, superintendent 
of schools, was named Virginia EducaticHial 
Administrate of theiYear by the Vurginia Assn. of 
Educational Secretaries. 

The 1974 city budget was released, calling for a 13 
per cent increase in expaiditures. 

By April the city had signed a water c(Hitract 
with Norfolk, ending an eight-month moratorium 
(H\ new water connections in the Beach. The 
moratorium had brmight ccmstruction to a i^ar 
standstill. 

IN MAY Mary Barraco, a former Nazi POW who 
worked underground for the French in World War 
II, received the George Washington H(Hior Medal 
for her patriotic activities. Augustus Brown was 
sworn in as the first black justice of the peace in the 
Beach, and Princess Anne and Kempsville high 
schools won state championships in golf and 
baseball. 

Vice-mayor ReidErvin introduced to city council 




Sun's rays 
sparkle in 
a lone tree 

The branches of a lone 
tree on Landstown Road 
sparkle with the light of 
the winter sun, creating 
a jewel-like effect 
amidst the greenery. 
The brightness of the 
sun behind the tree 
emphasizes the 
starkness of the setting 
and creates the 
silhouette effect against 
the sky. A wide-angle 
lens with the addition of 
special filters causes 
the appearance of the 
halo image armmd the 
tree. (Sun photo by Lou 
Roberts) 



Forum 




some say in how the land is tp be developed 
around Uiem. ' 

Several of our CQuncilmen have ex- 
pressed to the news media how well they 
realize we are becoming a city of 
townhouses, apartments and commercial 
sites and that something must be done. 

I certainly trust when the rezoning of the 
Sanderlin Farm comes again before the 
city council, they will take a real long look 
at the situation and deny rezoning. 



TTie schools that service our borough are 
already over-crowded, our roads are at 
capacity and we certainly have enough 
vacancies in these type dwellings in our 
borough to accomodate those who would 
like to move out this way. 



Letters from 
our readers 

Sad in Kempsville 

sir: 

The people in the Kempsville borough 
have been involved since mid-September 
trying to get the Virginia Beach Planning 
Commission and City Council to deny a 
zone change on the Sanderlin Farm from 
single family to multi-family and com- 
mercial. 



It has been denied once and okayed once 
by the planning commission. It has gone to 
city council twice only to have it refrared 
back to planning, and the second time they 
allowed the devetope? to withdraw tiieir 
plans (after the people had waited four 
hours to be heard) when the devetopers 
realized their chance of winning wctc 
slim. 

This type situatiiw has been r^eated 
COTSlantly on the Kemi«viUe bon»^ in 
rec^it years. It is certainly sad the peq)le 
of any borou^ must be axistanUy in- 
c(mv«uaiced to make trip aft^ trip to city 
hall toexpre^opporition. It would seem to 
me that th^ ma who have bees ^«cted 
by the peofrie woaM let the pe^rile h»ve 



Shirley Lewis yours? 



his profit or hold his present prices. Are 
these sources too greedy to set prices on 
their own and save our free enterprise 
system, or would they rather be controlled 
and shout abuse about the police state? 

The choice is really up to them. After all, 
taxes along every step of the way are 
passed on to the people in the form of in- 
creased prices, leaving the in-betweens 
tax-free. Every step also produces tax for 
the government. The more steps, the more 
tax. 

We live in a land of plenty. We would like 
to pay an honest dollar for an honestly 
prices amount of goods. Why give away 
our surplus wheat when it could be used to 
reduce the price of a loaf of bread? 

Can we reverse this trend and everyone 
fight inflation? My offer stands. How about 



Sydney M. Dows 



Standing offer 



Sir: 

As a recipient of Civil Service and Social 
Security annuities, I am about to receive a 
5.S per cent Civil Service increase and an 
11 per coit increase in Social Security by 
July 1974, a total of 16.5 per cent. If I said 
that I did not want the increases, people 
would say, "That fellow is off his rocker." 
Yet, I know from past experience what will 
happen. Everyone who has anything to sell 
me will go up on everthing he sells. So 
where do we stand? No better, surely, and 
maybe worse off. 

The cost of yving index will show 
another increase in my annuity and ex- 
penses. Shmdd otho^ have to pay more 
because I got a raise? Am I helping in- 
flation? I feel that I im costing others, who 
are raising families and need every cent, 
more in Social Security deductions. If the 
spiral continues, what do we have to look 
forward to? WiU the dollar in time buy 20 
cents worth of merdiandtse instead of 50 
coits worth today? 

I would gladly sacrifice this 1S.S per cent 
incr^se if evoy merchant, chain store, 
(^ributor, manufacturer, packer, stock 
holde- anl all Uie oth«« b^k to tte raw 
matoial (rnKkK^* will reAice a ^lare (rf 



In merjkory 



Sir: 

By the time this letter to the editor is 
printed the 45th birthday of the late and 
beloved Dr. Martin Luther King will be 
gone, but his memories still remain in the 
hearts of many of the American peoi^e 
today. 



Before his death at the age of 39, Dr. 
King had won the world's respect and 
admiration as a leader of the "civil rights" 
protest that began with the Montgomery 
tKi8-boyo>tt in IKS and ended with his 
aisassination in Memphis cm April 4, 1968. 

Since that time there have be«i many 
changes in Uiis coinitry, but the fuinUment 
of his "dream" is stili becoming a reality. 

William Bennett 



The Sun welcomes «0 ktten from in read- 
tn. Names \MI be wUhheU mi request, but 
plMte incbtde yatr mrnie and teleph<me mm- 
ber mth your letter. Letters art ml^t to 
editum to meet new^mper styk and space re- 
^utwMma. Write: Forum, Vb^raa Beach &ih, 
138 RomMmt Rd., V^^Hle Bem:h, Va 23451 



on May 21 a resolution which would have required 
city officials to make public their finances, but the 
move was (tefeated by a 6-5 vote on June 4. 

During the last week of June, Fort Story opened 
750 feet of beach Igc public use on weekends in an 
effOTt to ease the crowded conditions caused by a 
record year of tcHirists. Despite threats (A 
enforcement of the Sunday closing law (which was 
later averted), the Boardwalk Art Show netted 
more than $120,000 for the week-long event. 

On the final day of June, the city learned of one of 
the most violent crimes in its history. Two 19-year- 
dd girls, Lynn Seethaler and Janice Pietropole of 
Pittsburgh, were found brutally murdered in a 
Beach motel cottage. The girls had been 
vacationing here. No suspect has yet been charged 
in the slaying. 



DAVID OZMAN and Mt. Trashmore were, the: 
stars of the day on July 14, when the garbage 
mound-turned-park officially opened. Young David 
won the Tidewater Soap Box Derby, the first 
scheduled event for Virginia Beach's answer to the 
garbage problem. ^ 

It took three July meetings for the city council 
finally to approve funding for the Virginia Beach 
Qvic Ballet, bi»t not without establishing the Arts 
and Humaniti^ Commissiwi as a byproduct of the ' 
confusion. j 

After two reversals and a parade of irate 
choreographers, the council agreed to fund the 
civic ballet but set up the commission to handle 
such requests in the future. 

Meanwhile, the 45-15 school attendance program 
was in full swing in Princess Anne Plaza. Students 
alternated nine weeks of classwork with three 
weeks of vacation to maximize use of facilities in 
this year-round education pilot project. 

The city^s new information "Hotline" was 
averaging 50 callers a day by early August, and the 
emergency mobile coronary care unit was in 
operation. Also in August, school lunches went up a 
nickel, and the Pungo Bluegrass Festival promoter 
lost more than $35,000 on his musical extravaganza. 

ON AUG. 27 Charles Gardner, having led tl» 
fight against topless dancing, struck out at 
pornography again. His anti-obscentity ordinance 
passed city council, forbiddmg display of Playboy 
and other such magazines wher^ juveniles could 
see them. 

The Plaza Express Transit (PET) began in 
October a 90-day trial of rush hour commuter runs 
to and from Norfolk, but the project has been halted ,, 
since by a bus driver strike against Carolina 
Trailways. 

Novonber was a month for both new and 
familiar faces. The elections saw Owen Pickett and 
Glenn MClanan returned to the Virginia House (rf 
Delegate, and a fcxiner Jhaytnr, Donald Rhodes,^ 
also won a seat. An ex-state patrohnan, S.J. "Joe" 
Smith was elected sheriff of Virginia Beach. 

Garland Isdell was appointed to fill Mr. Rhodes 
vacant seat on city council, and Lawrence A. 
Sancilio was named president of the Virginia Beach 
Chamber of Commerce. „ 

Plans were announced for the first annual 
Virginia B6ach Neptune Festival, to be held during 
the fall of 1974. Frederick Napojitano, festival 
chairman, said the nine-day event will feature 
sporting contests, symphony concerts and a 
coronation ball. 

THE CONTINUING problem of sand er(»ion— 
which had defeated the ingenuity of sand fence- 
builder John Potter— may have found a partial ^ 
solution in a $3 million plan to replace the beach 
with sand dredged from the Chesapeake Bay. 

Nov. 29 went down in local history as the day the 
CZO became law. And by the end of the year, the 
energy crisis had reduced garbage collection to 
once a week in the Beach. 

Confidence took a beating in 1973. The dollar was 
devalued twice, and by December, a Gallup Poll 
showed that only two professions, doctors and . 
garbagemen, held the confidence of more than 50 '. 
per cent of the people. ; 

Virginia Beach rejoiced, applauded and suffered ' 
through it all. And as 1974 unfolds, by golly. Beach 
residents can say. We hung in there, baby." 




Many of our readers prefer to get 
their personal copies of The Sun by 
mail. 

If you wish The Sun to be mailed 
weekly to your home or butinen, mail 
us the coupon and service will begin 
immediately. 

Mail To: 

Virginia Beach Sun 

Circulation Dept. 

138 Rosemont Rd. 

Virginia Beach, Va. 23452 



iN^se Mail The Sun To: 



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I 1Yr.$9n 6Mos.$4.50n 3Mos.$2.S0()! 

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^[^i^Wl 1 ISIW 



1 



HASSLES 




~ V \'\ 



By 

Donna 

Hendrick 



Singing those 
washday blues 

Going to the laundromat is a horrible hassle. 

The whole thing begins when I suddenly realize 
I've run out of clean clothes completely and I'm 
se'rioiisly §hort on tbwels and all those other 
necessary things. 

&> I must load the laundry basket, find the 
detergent, get some hangere, haul the load down to 
the car and proceed to the nearest coin-operated 
laundromat. 

I'm a big chicken and I dot't like doing the 
laundry at night in an almost deserted laundromat. 
Who knows what types of fiends are lurking be- 
hind thewashers in the dark, waiting to pounce? 

BEING A CHICKEN means I have to do the 
laundry on weekends in the daytime when everyone 
else in town without the convenience of a washer 
and dryer is also doing laundry— at the same 
laundromat. 

The first problem is money. I never have the right 
change for both washers and dryers. (Why 
don't they make washers and dryers that use the 
same types of change?) The employes of the con- 
veniesnce store next door growl at me if I try to get 
change from them because I'm always the 21,435th 
person to ask them for change that day. The 
automatic coin changers in the laundromat never 
work, of course, and I never have anyttiing but 
folding money anyway. 

MOST OF THE clothes I own are permanent 
press. Their labels state very clearly that they 
should be washed in warm water, tumbled dry at 
medium heat and hung on hangers immediately. 

Most commercial washers are fine for permanent 
press because they offer a choice of water tem- 
peratures. Some progressive laundromats even 
have washers with a permanent press "cool-down" 
cycle. But I've never yet seen a commercial dryer 
with a temperature control. (Maybe I'm going to 
the wrong laundromat.) So the permanent press' 
items get baked at the same high temperature as 
the big, thick towels, which destroys the whole 
purpose of permanent press. 

Miat I really love about the laundromat are the 
people who frequent it, especially the children. 
While I'm trying to separate the light items from 
the dark or the permanent press from the wrinkle- 
prone, there is always a 4-year-old watching my 
every move with great interest and commentii^ in 
a loud voice on my choice of underwear. ("Look, 
mommy, the lady has pink panties.") 

There are also those who own a washer but not a 
dryer. They bring in all their wet laundry and 
monopolize the dryers, while we poor slobs who 
have to do both washing and drying in the laun- 
dromate wait in vain for an empty dryer. 

Then there are the folk who toss their clothes into 
the washers and leave for hours. They leave their 
clean but wet clothes for some other customer to 
unload if that customer wants to use one of the 
washers these inconsiderate persons have filled up. 
The same goes for the dryers . 

AFTER MY clothes are dry, the permanent press 
ones must go on hangers immediately. But where 
are you supposed to hang these clothes while you're 
folding all the others? Some laundromats provide 
movable racks to hang up permanent press clothes 
and s6me don't. Mine doesn't. ^ 

Someday I'm going to own a washer and dryer, 
too, so I can sit back and drink a cup of tea in my 
own home while the laundry almost does itself. 
Then I'll think about those poor people still playing 
the laundromat game and hope I never have to set 
foot in there again. 



face/ 



by Rod ■Mil 




If tests give you the jitters and 
make you conjure up nightmarish 
thoughts of failure, the city of 
Virginia Beach has someone there 



to help you forget all those 
thoughts. She's Gwen Henley, and 
she's a jewel in the city's 
personnel testing room. 



The Sun-Wednesday, January 16, 1974— Page A-3 



Bandit bags golfers' wallets 



WUliAiD F. Huber of Norfolk 
was robbed for the second time 
on the Kempsville Meadows 
Golf Course Jan. 8. Mr. Huber, 
73, and three golfing partners 
were robbed at gunpoint at the 
15th tee. 

JohnL.Diggs,71, isquotedwith 

saying a masked bandit rushed 
out of the woods brandishing a 
pistol and demanding the men 
put their wallets into a paper 
bag he tossed on the ground. He 
reportedly fired a shot into the 
ground near the golfer's feet. In 
his haste to escape the bandit 
left one of the wallets behind. 
He reportedly got around $10 in 

Beach PTA 
istill largest 

in the state 

The Virginia Beach Parent 
Teacher Assn. (PTA) con^iiiues 
to be the larg^t (rf any cHy in 
the state, according to figures 
compiled duping the first week 
in January. 

Membership of the Beach 
association increased almost 
six^per cent last year. The local 
association now has 41 PTA 
chapters in the city with a 
membership of 17,022, an 
increase of 1,004 members over 
last year's membership of 
16,018. 

Two new chapters were 
started this s(;hopl year at 
Hermitage Elementary School 
and the Center for Effective 
Learning. 



the stick-up. None of the golfers, 
identified as Mr. Diggs of West 
Lynn Shores; Herman 0. 
FYeeman, 74, of Thalia Point 
Road; Albert Phillips, 57, Rolfe 
Avenue, Norfolk; and Mr. 
Huber, Monroe Place, Norfolk, 
were injured during the rob- 
bery. At last reports police were 



still searching for a suspect in 
the robbery. 

Mr. Huber was robbed on the 
golf course the first time some 
five years ago on the 13th tee. In 
addition to that robbery, police 
also report another robbery 
occured within the last two 
years on the course. 



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Attorney plans to delay 
dentistry board actions 



Attorney Richard G. Brydges 
indicates he will take legal 
action to prevent the Virginia 
Board of Dentistry from han- 
dling sodomy charg^ filed 
against a Virginia Beach oral 
surgeon uritil the matter is 
resolved in local courts. 

Commonwealth's Atty. Andre 
Evans nol-prossed the charge 
Jan. 7 in Circuit Court on 
grounds this would permit the 
board to decide what action 
should be taken in the case of 
Dr. Frederic R. Levitin. Such a 
move does not preclude future 
criminal proceedings against 
Dr. Levitin, 32, on the charge. 

Mr. Brydges said Thursday, 
"If the board decides to proceed 
I will have to take some action 
to enjoin them for doing so until 



the matter is disposed of in the 
courts." Mr. Brydges said he 
felt that before the board 
be permitted to act on the matter 
the case should be tried 
in court or the charges 
dismissed, with prejudice, 
which means criminal action 
could not be renewed. 

The dentistry board, which 
has the power to suspend or 



revoke licenses, has indicated it 
plans to hold a public hearing on 
the matter in Richmond within 
the next two months. 

The woman who says the 
incident allegedly occurred last 
January in Dr. Levitin's 
Independence Boulevard office 
has filed civil action against Dr. 
Levitin seeking $50,000 in 
damages. 



Bar assn. picks Guy 
as new president 



NAVY HONORS DOW 

Midshipman first class 
Michael J. Dow of Virginia 
Beach has been named one of 
six battalion commanders <^t 
the U.S. Naval Academy in 
Annapolis, Md. 

As one of the top ranking 
midshipmen in the academy, he 
will command a 600-man bat- 
talion through March 3. 

A 1969 graduate of Bayside 
High School, Midshipman Dow 
is majoring in general 
engineering at the Naval 
Academy. He is the son of John 
F. Dow of Five Forks Road. 



Attorney Richard D. Guy was 
installed Friday as the new 
president of the Virginia Beach 
Bar Assn. at the association's 
annual meeting at the new 
Sheraton-Beach Inn. 

Robert S. Wahab Jr., senior 
judge of the circuit court of 
Virginia Beach, installed the 
newly-elected officers of the 
association, including Grover C. 
Wright as vice-president, John 
K. Moore as secretary and W. 
Edward Hudgins Jr. as 
treasurer. 

Mr. Guy, 42, is a partner in 
the Virginia Beach law firm of 
Owen, Guy, Rhodes and Betz. 
He and his family live in 
Chesopeian Colony. 

He succeeds J.R. "Jim" 
McKenry as president. 





BLEYLE 

SUPERBLY— COLOR 

CO-ORDINATED 
SPORTSWEAR FROM 
EUROPE. BLAZERS, 
SHELLS, SLACKS, IN 
EASY-CARE 

POLYESTER 

ALL PERFECTLY 
MATCHED TO 
EACH OTHER. 



"For the Woman who Cares H'hat She Wears' 

111 College Place Norfolk 
3303 Atlantic Ave. Va. Beach ' 



GUY 




Ethan Allen 
Home Fashion Sale. 



Save on irlegant Elhan Allen living rcx5rns and dining rooms 




(tpi'n Sfiindnxs and Fnrfffx-* T" M / 



B 



CRAWFORD HOUSE 

Sorfclk . . . -iTJ S. Military H'uay .,. W[-m21 



i^^ 



m^^'m'-W 



Page A-4-The Sun-^edneKlay, January 16, 1974 



Factions had a smaller role in 1973 council 



By LINDA MILLER 
Sun SUff Writer 

The Virginia Beach City 
CouncU is probably the most 
unpredictable group in the city. 

At one time the council was 
composed along factional lines,* 
and predicting the voting 
pattern of one group on specific 
issues seemed simple. But the 
vote switching during the past 
year would imlicate that, for 
all practical purposes, those 
factional lines are gone. 

It is still normal for Coun- 
cilman John Baum, Councilman 
Charles Gardner and Vice- 
mayor Reid Ervin to cast 
idoitical votes on an issue, but 
even they have been known to 
sifiit \heir "factional" vote this 
year, (lliis .group has been 
called by some the "Ervin" 
faction and by others the "anti- 
organization" faction.) 

ANOTHER group, called the 
"pro-organization" group 



because of their connection with 
the Sidney Kellam political 
organization that ruled Beach 
politics for so long, also has split 
on various issues. Councilman 
George Ferrell, Councilman Dr. 
Clarence Holland, Councilman 
Floyd Waterfield and Coun- 
cilman Robert Callis are most 
often named to this group. ^ 

Aftd Mayor Robert Cromwell, 
along with Councilman Murray 
Malbon and Councilman Curtis 
Payne (who are considered 
"anti-organization," but don't 
fit in with the "Ervin" group 
either), have jumped from side 
to side in different conflicts. 

Former Councilman Donald 
Rhodes was at one time con- 
sidered to be a member of the 
"pro-organization" friction, but 
he too seemed to vote in- 
dependently prior to resigning 
from the council to fill a seat in 
the General Assembly. Gaaland 
Isdell, Mr. Rhodes' successor, 
was also called a "Kellam" 
man after his appointment to 



the council, but his voting at the 
few meetings he has attended 
has proven to be nothing but 
indq)endent. t 

APRIL 17^ was a day to 
remember in 1973. The councfl 
brought to an aid nearly four 
years of n^otiat;ions for, a 
water contract with Norfolk. 

The Beach agreed to pay 
Norfolk in a bulk rat^ of 48.5 
cents per 1,000 gallons of water 
for resale in the Beach. The 6 to 
S vote by the« council to accept 
the contract also put an end to 
an eight-month moratorium on 
new water connections imposed 
on the Beach during the final 
months of contract 
n^otiations. The moratorium 
seriously curtailed construction 
in the city. 

The counciU however, delayed 
establiriiing a water i;ate or- 
dinance for ^ Beach residents 
until September, then, despite 
pfeas from Vice-mayor Ervin to 
establish a flat rate, the council 



Update 



In 1973 the Vlr^rUa Beach City Council wa at unpndktaMe 
at ever. One reaton may have been the diminlthed rak played 
by formerty ttrong factions. Sun Staff Writer Linda Miller exam- 
ines a year's work by the unpredictable sity council 



A water contract, obscenity, finan- 
cial disclosure and closed meetings 
were among the main issues facing 
city councit last year. 



^4 



One of America's 
Most Beautiful 



Airports! 




Landscaped by 



WINN NURSERY, Inp, 

NORFOLK, VIRGINIA 



passes a water rate ordinance 
basing rates on volume con- 
sumption. The "incoitive rate," 
as it is known, is to help draw 
big industry to the city. Rates 
now range from 82 ctots per 
1,000 gallons per quarter if a 
consumer uses 0-30,000 gallons 
of water to 60 cents per 1,000 
gallons per quarter for persons 
using 100,000 gallons or more. 
The ordinance also calls for step 
rate service charges based on 
Uie size of the consumer's water 
meter. 

THE NEW water contract by 
no means promised city water 
for all. Many person are still 
, without city water. And those 
who do have city service are 
wondering whether they will 
ever get a bill for the water— 
and when they do, wiU they be 
able to pay it. Computfr 
changes to adapt to Norfolkli 
billing procedures have caused 
a six month delay in billing. 

The councU also made history 
with the unanimous passage of 
the Comprehensive Zoning 
Ordinance (CZO) in October. 
The council and the planning 
commission batted the or- 
dinance back and forth for three 
years before its passage. Even 
when it was passed there 
continued to be much public 
dissent. 



CONGRATUUITIONS 

TO THE CITY OF 

VIRGINIA 
BEACH 

On Your Continued 
Growth And Progress 

HOLMES 

NURSING HOME 

340-0620 




Virginia Beach, Va. 



I 




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to a giant potentid with one welding machine and one pick-up truck. Men of the future, John 
and George Parker, worked, designed, developed and perfactsd tfie Parco portable building of 
today. Now with a caravan of truck and tiailer equipment, a 50,000 square foot assemtMy 
plant, f(Mjr score employees, coupled with steel and the finest quality building materials, 
J.K. Parker, Im:. has become one of the leaders in this mushrooming industry. 

J.K. IHirkiBr is proud to be part of a tfiriving Virginia Beach. It is proud to serve it and arras of 
the east with a quality product now so much in ctomand. J.K. Parker pledges to ccmtinue to 
produra only the most exacting modular units, to the most exacting specif ications at a cost below 
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Our 25 th Anniveriary 

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VIRGINIA BEACH 



^mm ^ for MorB Information 
^^^l^ CALL ZAO-S^W 



Now that the CZO is in effect, 
the council hears cases where 
citizens feel their property was 
unjustly rezoned. Numerous 
suits have been filed against the 
city over provisions in the CZO. 
The document was not enough 
by itself, and the council has 
passed several supporting 
ordlinances since the adoption of 
the CZO, which include 
provisions for shopping centers, 
planned housing developments 
and erosion and sedimentation. 



THE YEAR was also the year 
for Councilman Charles Gard- 
ner, who succeeded in covering 
uptiie "bare essentials" of k>cal 
night club dancers, and pin-up 
girls at the local newsstands 
with his anti-nudity and anti- 
smut ordinances. Both or- 
dinances stirred public 
emotion. There were those who 
spoke out for the ordinances In 
the name of morality and others 
who continued to believe in the 
individual's freedom of choice. 

The ordinance prohibiting 
topless go-go dancing brought a 
'court injunction the same day it 
was passed and has continued to 
make the news pages because of 
various club owners w^o feel 
the only way their establish- 
ments can survive is to have 
some sort of show or gimmick. 

And no longer can one find 
magazines like "Playboy" on 
display on shelves at the 
newsstand. Mr. Gardner's 
ordinance bans the display of 
such "nudity" magazines from 
the sight of juveniles. Only 
persons 18 years or older may 
purchase the magazines from 
"under-the counter." 

THE COUNCIL unantfnously 
passed the ordinance of which 
there were really three or- 



dinances, but as Vice-mayor 
Ervin put it, "It's kind of like 
ntotherhood and apple pie, and 
it's hard to vote against it." 

Despite the unanimous vote, 
it's interesting to recall some of 
the comments made prior to the 
vote during a survey of the 
council by The Sun: 

"You mean he (Mr, Gardner) 
doesn't want to look at all those 
pretty girls?"— Mr. Malbbn. 

"People don't pay attrition to 
those magazines anymore. It 
used to be, 'Hey, I've got a 
Playboy,' but now people don't 
care."— Dr. Holland. 

"Most people find out about 
things like sex and reproduction 
whether they're published i^ a 
newspaper or magazine or 
not."— Mr. Ferrell. 

The question of whether the 
ordinance is enforceable 
remains to be seen. The or- 
dinance ppg^es only for in- 
vestigation by the police of a 
store after complaints from a 
citizen. However, the manager 
of a Peoples Drug Store was 
recently arrested (the first 
arrest made under the or- 
dinance) for having "Playboy" 
on the shelves in view of 
juveniles covered only by a 
brown paper band. 

THE EXPENDITURES of 

Revenue Sharing funds sparked 
much council debate. (The 
proposed $220,000 tennis 
complex was especially con- 
troversial). After postponing 
the revenue package presented 
by City Manager Roger Scott 
for several weeks, the council 
passed the proposed ex- 
penditures only to find out later 
that the Virginia Beach Finance 



Dept. had over-estimated the 
amount of federal funds due 
the Beach by more than 
$200,000. It was decided the city 
would reduce the previous, 
appropriation for the addition to 
the Administration Building by 
$245,352, since contracts for the 
construction cannot be let until 
the latter part of Fiscal year '74. 
(Though there's been a lot of 
talk about tennis courts, the 
council didn't get around to 
actually designating that 
$220,000 to specific tennis court 
projects until a couple of weeks 
ago.) 

In 1973 the council also 
established an Arts and 
Humanities Commission — after 
a $8,000 grant to the Virginia 
Beach Civic Ballet brought 
irate dancers from around the 
city down to the council 
. chambers. The commission will 
review all fund requests from 
area art groups before they go 
to the council. 

AN IMPORTANT proposal 
that the council didn't pass was 
a resolution calling for annual 
financial disclosures by all 
councilmen, the city manager 
and other appointed officials. 
The council defeated the 
resolution by a 6 to 5 vote. 

Eight of 11 councilmen and 
the city manager complied with 
a request from The Sun to 
voluntary supply the newspaper 
with financial statements for 
publication after (he resolution 
was defeated. Those who did not 
were Mayor Cromwell, Mr. 
Callis, and Mr. Ferrell. Mr. 
Waterfield, who did not have the 
information compiled when The 
Sun published the other 
statements in August, said he 
would file a financial statement 
with the city clerk ^s soon as he 



*^^^^^^^^* ** ■■■■■■■■ *— -- i - i -yyyy-M-ynrw'irinrunrLrxrtnjTjviJvuTJxr^^ 



M^^«MMW«MMMMAAM^ 




Krispy KremeCoughnut Company - 4001 Virginia Beach Boulevard 
Opened November 1 5, 1 966 

We congratulate the city of Virginia Beach on its astounding growth 
since Its birth ten years ago. Our success in this location is greatly 
attributa ble to the pat ronage of the people of Virginia Beach. We 
take this opportunity to express our sincere thanks for letting us 
serve you. 




JiJuAQulViemeo 



DOUGHNUTS 



>WM«^«#MM*AMMMMM^ 



got the material together. He 
has not filed that statement yet, 
however. 

Those councilmen who 
fayored the resolution felt it 
would help restore faith in 
government in light of the 
Watergate affair. But, even 
those who favored open 
disclosure, continued to vote 
unanimously every Monday to 
hold a closed session the 
following Monday prior to the 
regular council session. 

IN ONE OF those closed 
sessions, and after an earlier 
get-together, the councir chose 
Mr. Isdell to take over the 
Kempsville Borough seat 
vacated by Donald Rhodes. Mr. 
Rhodes was elected to the 
General Assembly in 
November. The question in the 
public's mind was not whether 
Mr. Isdell was a qualified 
replacement, but was it legal 
for the council to appoint a 
person to fill an elected position 
in a closed session. 

The proposed purchase of 
Bow Greek Golf Course dragged 
on for months. Residents of the 
Bow Creek area don't want to 
see a huge residential 
development replace the open 
space of the golf course. The 
council has heard several 
proposals concerning what 
should be done with the land. 
After two appraisals they of- 
fered golf course owner Edward 
Garcia $1,035,000 for the 118- ., 
acre parcel, but he turned the~" 
offer down. Now, the land may 
undergo another two or three 
appraisals to obtain an 
agreeable price. Then, the , 
proposed purchase will go to the 
voters for approval or disap- 
proval. 

.*' 

While the council approved 
6,304 building permits for a 
total of $229 million in con- 
struction Value, last ^^ear most 

recently there has been a move 
to stricter with area builders 
and control some of the City's 
growth. Councilman Gardner 
proposes the city develop a lanf) 
use plan for the future. ^ 

THE GENERAL ASSEMBLY 

will be hearing a resolution soon 
asking for a charter change to . 
increase the city's bonding 
capacity. Quarrels over 
whether the. city needed in- 
creased bonding capacity 
started last summer after a 
proposal became a campaign 
issue for Del. Glenn McClanan 
in Septembei<!^nd the coun- 
cilmen began to get numerous 
phone calls questioning the 
proposal. A special bankers' 
committee was appointed to 
study the matter, and their 
proposal to increase the city's " 
bonding capacity to 10 per cent 

of the assessed value of real 
estate (or six per cent of the 
true value) is the resolution the 
General Assembly will con- 
sider. 

But the resolution may not 
meet witl\ the support it needs 
to pass in the General 
Assembly. Del. McClanan and 
Sen. A. Joseph Canada, who 
oppose the change without a 
voter referendum, say they will 
work against th^ proposal. 

With the arrival of the new 
year, the May election is on the 
minds of at least six council 
members. (Terms expire for 
Dr. Holland, Mr. Malbon, Mr. 
Isdell, Mr. Waterfield, Mayor 
Cromwell, and Vice-mayor 
Ervin.) And while 1973 brought 
the' splitting of the council 
factions, the 1974 election could 
change the voting again. 



St 



_ 



% 



Helping to Build 

VIRGINIA BEACH 

C.L. Pincus, Jr. & Company 




SPECIALISTS IN 

BUTLER BUILOrNGS 

and building systems 



^-}4>9 




General 
Contractors 




Ideal ffy stores, offices, bo«irling lanes, 
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UNDERGROUND UTILITIES 
:* ^muTLmif% '^" -w.ww.„« SYSTEMS DIVISION 



PW^ 



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" f: '^Ji=- ^^ "tTrf 



Rapid growth the key 
but also the suspect 



4^3 



By LINDA MILLER 
Sun Staff Writer 

Grgwtii has cmiUnued toltl 
the key word in Virginia 
Beach^-^frowth from a small 
township in 1906 to a city in 1%Z 
and a merger with the 
surrounding Princess Anne 
County in 1963. 1973 was no 
exception in city growth. 

Witii a total of 310 square 
miles (land and inland water 
bodies included), Virginia 
Beacti ranks among the 25 
largest cities in land area in the 
U.S. (it ranks third in the state). 
And, with 28 miles of shoreline 
stretching to the outer banks, 
the city has earned the title "the 
world's largest resort city." It 
is that shoreline that draws 
more than 32,000 persons daily 
to the resort area in the summer 
months. 

The beach is also the key to 
the boom in population, housing 
construction and industrial 
growth in the city. Virginia 
Beach, undeniably one of th6 
fastest growing cities in the 
state, hit an estimated 
'^ population of 206,500 during 
January, 1973. (The population 
is expected to continue to grow 
at an annual rate of 3.7 per cent, 
reaching the 256,000 mark by 
1980.) The Virginia Beach 
Planning Dept. estimates 
that the greatest 

growth has taken place 
in Kempsville Borough. Since 
the 1970 Census, the borough 
; has gained approximately 
;' 12,000 residents. Kempsville is a 
; part of the city's "growth 
corridor" where most of the 
new housing additions are being 
built. 

ESTIMATES OF statistics 
show that, in 1970, the Virginia 
Beach population was 90 per 
cent white. Beach residents 
were better educated and 
wealthier than those in 
"~ surrounding cities. Thu^y-eight 
per cent of the population is 
between the ages of 21 and 44. 

With the population growth 
has come industrial develop- 
ment. Companies moving to the 
city's various industrial parks 
during 1973 brought with th«m 
469 new jobs. (Two hundred of 
- those job positions are with 
"^^ Snark Boat Products, which has 
not ,yet recruited all its em- 
ployes, and an additional 250 
positions will open up with the 
completion (rf the Lik^n, Inc. 
building in Airport Industrial 
Park. Major industrial and 
"distribution companies that 
moved to the area this past year 
include Associated Tt-ansport, 
(Tooper Split Roller Bearing 
Corp., Reliance Universal, J.C. 
Penny (area distributor). 
Burger King (meat processing) 
and Prestige Kitchen. Other 
major manufacturing em- 
ployers are Yoder Dairies Inc., 
Forbes Candies, J. K. Parker, 
Inc., Guille Steel Products Co. 
Inc., Krispy Kreme Donut Co. 
Inc., Ferrell Brothers Inc. 
and Sadler Materials (3orp. 

The entire 202 acres in the 
Airport Industrial Park off 
Diamond Springs Road had 
been optioned. The park was 
begun in 1971. The city will now 
look to Oceana West Industrial 
Park for attracting new 
businesses to the area. 

THE NUMBER of the city's 
retail establishments has also 
grown with new stores in Hilltop 
Plaza and Hilltop Square 
(Hilltop West is just beginning 
to open new shops), a new 
Mazda and Toyota dealership 



and numerous smaller 
businesses along Virginia 
Beach Boidevard. 

1972 statistics from the 
Virginia Employment Com- 
mission show that ap; ' 
proximately 38,000 persons 
make up the city's civilian work 
force. An average family in- 
come is more than $10,000 a 
year. Leading employers are 
govemmoit and the wholesale 
and r|^il trade, whij:h employ 
more than 8,000 parsons each. 

Perhaps the most astounding 
figure for the year is the 
number of building permits 
issued. While the Beach is only 
78th in population of the nati(His 
200 largest cities, it ranks 14th 
out of those same cities in the 
total value of construction in the 
area in 1973. While the con- 
struction in most cities declined 
by two per cent, the con- 
struction in the Beach increased 
by 58 per cent. 

A TOTAL OF 6,304 building 
permits were issued amounting 
to more than $229 niillion in 
construction value (land cost 
not included). The city 
government approved 2,380 
single family dewUtaig units, 
2,800 multi-family units for sale, 
1,478 multi-family units for rent 
and 158 duplex units. (The 1970 
Census showed the Beach 
having approximately 48,000 
housing units or about 3.2 per 
cent of all housing units in 
Virginia.) Commercial con- 
struction (including motels, 
hotels and retail establish- 
ments) netted 93 new building 
permits last year for a total 
construction value of almost $19 
million. 

The rapid population growth 
and construction has come 
under much criticism from 
some Virginia Beach City 
Council members, qity planners 
and local citizens. Councilman 
Charles Gardner, concerned 
with the problem, has urged 
that the city develop some type 
of land-use plan. Mr. Gardner 
was the impetus for the coun- 
cU's trip to Fairfax, Va., last 
week to meet with local officials 
to discuss how that county has 
been trying to deal with its 
growth problem. 

Besides regular development, 
Mt. Trashmore, which is to 
become one of the city's largest 
recreational areas, was of- 
ficially opened in 1973. The high 
pile of trash covered with dirt to 
form a mountain is hailed as 



The Sun-W«dn«sday, January 16, 1974— Page A-5 



one of the dty's most out- 
standing accomplishments. 
City Manager Roger Scott was 
presented with the 1973 
Environmental Planning 
Award for the city's efforts with 
Mt. Trashmore and passage of 
•r the Comprehensive 2ioning 
Ordinance. 

EVEN WITH the population 
boom and despite the fact titat 
41 per cent of the city's 
population commutes to 
Surrounding cities to work, the 
region has yet to devetop any 
efficient meails of transporting 
the masse%, Bus transportation 
in the Beach (the only form of 
mass transit) consists of bus 
trips along Virginia Beach 
Boulevard and an experimental 
commuter express transit from 
Princess Anne Plaza SiopDins 
Center to downtown Nor- 
folk. But even those services 
were shut down by a Carolina 
Trailway^bus drivers' strike 
which began Dec. 9. Most of the 
city's residents continue to fight 
the battle along "the 
Boulevard" and on the Virginia 
Beach-Norfolk Toll Road in 
their automobiles. (Special 
double-decker buses run in the 
Beach borough during 4he 
tourist season.) The in- 
tersection of Virginia Beach 
Boulevard and Independence 
Boulevard is the busiest in- 
terescetion hi the city, with 
50,000 automobiles traveling 
through it daily. 

The city is presently working 
with the Southeastern Virginia 
Planning District to 
prepare a plan for a trans- 
portation study to be funded by 
the Urban Mass Transit 
Authority. The study will take 
at least a year to complete, and 
it is doubtful that any major 
steps toward a transportation 
system will be made prior to 
that time. 

While the growth in the Beach 
is remarkable, and many 
persons point to it with pride, 
the continual population in- 
crease and addition of new 
developments throughout the 
city has caused the problem of 
keeping up with the demand for 
city services. Even some of the 
older, well-established com- 
munities remain without city 
water and sewer. And, as 
predictions promise continued 
growth, the city must now try to 
catch up with and meet demand 
for those services, or look for 
steps to control that future 
growth. 




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GENERAL TELEPHONE: AREA CODE 703-420-2480 
WAREHOUSE DIVISION: AREA CODE 703-420-6920 



Planners do 'comprehensive 'job 



By DONNA ftENDRlCK 
8u Stair Writer . 



Perhaps the greatest accomplishment of the 
Virginia Beach Planning Commission during 1973 
was the final adoption of the long-awaited Com- 
|M«hen8ive Zoning Ordinance (Clip). 

The City of Virginia Beach had opa*ated under 
two zoning ordinances since its birth in 1963. Ilie 
CZO Was to replace the Master Zoning (hxlinance of 
Princess Anne County and the Master Zoning 
Odinance of the City of Vhrghiia Beach. 

City planners experienced tremendous dif- 
ficulties in promoting orderly and planned growth 
in the rapidly mushrooming city while laboring 
under the restrictions of two obsolete zoning or- 
dnances'. 

IHE PLANNING commission's efforts to prepare 
the final CZO text and zontig maps for approval by 
city council started in 1971 and culminated in final 
approval on Oct. 29, 1973, when the council adoption 
of the CZO became a reality. 

The planning commission held its first 1973 
workshop on the CZO text four days after the new 
year was bom. January 1973, saw four planning 
commission workshops on the text and zoning 
maps. 

After January's series of workshops, an amended 
version of the CZO was released to the planning 
commissioners and the city's administrative review 
staff. 

The planning commission concentrated on the 
CZO zoning maps during three workshops in 
February to prepare the maps for pubic viewing 
before the first CZO public hearing of 1973. 

THE MAPS went on display in March, and the 
first heairing for both the CZO text and maps was 
held before the planning commission on March 21. 

After a series of city council briefings and 
worktops on the text and maps, the council 
received the planning commission's final recom- 
mendations and took them under advisement in 
May. 

The city council took over the CZO effort then and 
held a series of workshops, hearings and briefings 
from May until the final adoption in October. 

Planners attempted to use a "straight con- 
version" method in changing and renam^g plan- 
ning districts of the city. Whenever possible, zoning 
of various parcels of land was not changed when the 
zoning maps were adopted. If a certain parcel of 



Update 



In 1973, die Virginia Beach Pknulng Commission 
computed Its task of preparing the final version of die 
dty's new Compr^ei^e Zoning Ordinance. Sun 
Staff Writer Donna Hendrkk reviews the efforts of the 
dty i^anners. 



land was zoned agricultural under the Master 
Zoning Ordinance of Princess Anne County, at- 
tempts were made to retain the agricultural zoning 
under the CZO. 

HOWEVER, many residents of the city 
discovered their lisnd was not "straighlconverted" ' 
and both the planning commission and city council 
are now hearing requests for zoning changes to 
return many parcels to their original zoning 
classifications under the old zoning ordinances. 

In March of 1973, J. Harry Mote, then planning 
commission chairman, said of the CZO, "I think 
people are going to be real pleased with it." 

Mr. Mote's expectations may have been overly 
optimistic. Hotel and motel owners were concerned 
about density and height requirements in the new 
ordinance. Some residents were concerned that 
rezoning would affect tax assessments on their 
land. Civic leaders felt that land use plains used as 
guidelines by city plann^s were abandoned in the 
newest CZO revisions. 

The planning commission's CZO labors are by no 
means over, even though the ordinance is now law. 
At their final meeting of 1973, the planning com- 
missioners laid the groundwork for a public hearing 
at the end of this month to hear comments on the 
extablishment of historic and cultural districts 
within the city, as ouUined in the CZO. 

OF COURSE, the commission faced other 
decisions in 1973. Many were brought about by the 
newest entries to the Beach oceanfront and 
bayfront— the highrises. 

"A new way of life is coming— condominiums" 
read a Larasan Realty advertisement published in 
January 1973, to promote its bayfront high-rise 
condominium, the C3ies«peake House on the Bay. 

Larasan was undoubtedly correct in its 



assMsment of a "new way of life" for Virginia 
Beach developmofit. The year 1973 saw the 
proliferation of new high-rise concfeminiums on the 
Chesapeake Bayfront. 

A total of six condominiums are now under 
construction or in the planning stages for the 
bayfront, as well as additional concominiums on the 
oceanfront and in other areas of the city. 

CITY PLANNERS became concerned over the 
change of the bayfront from a sparsely populated 
residential development to a high-density, 
congested area. Planners worried that new 
developments in the area would overtax public 
services, such as water and sewer systems and 
recreational facilities. 

To evaluate the existing density and future 
growth possibilities, the city's planning department 
undertook a study of the bayfront and the impact of 
development on Uiat area of the city, To help the 
planning department implements its study, city 
council imposed a 90-day moratorium on all zoning 
changes east of the Lesner Bridge on the 
Chesapeake Bay. The moratorim went into effect 
last month. 

IN ADDITION to work on Uie CZO and im- 
plementation of -the moratorium, the planning 
commission heard innumerable zoning change and 
use permit requests during the year. 

Time and time again, commissioners had to 
weigh objections of residents opposed to the 
development of multi-family housing and com- 
mercial enterprises in their neighborhoods against 
the future growth and development of the city. 

Residents of the Hilltop area won a major victory^ 
in January when the planning commission 
recommended denial of an application to exp<ind 
Hilltop North 'Shopping Center by building an en- 
closed mall immediately east of the center. 

IN MARCH, the commission approved a use 
permit for construction of a 100-bed convalesc«fil 
facility near the General Hospital of Virginia 
Beach, despite the objections of the hospital and 
Medicenters of America. 

In August, it was residents of north Virginia 
Beach against other residents of the north end in, ^ 
dispute over a use permit for the Assn. for 
Research and Enlightment Inc. to build a library on 
its property on AUantic Avenue. The commission 
approved the permit after hearing one hour of 
debate. 



BAYSJDE PHARMACY 

STARTS THE NEW YEAR RIGHT 




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OF 
. HHICS 



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Your 

IndivMual 

Medication 

Rocord 




A - We believe, "A pharmacist should hold the health and safety of patients to be of first consideration; he 
should render to each patient the full measure of his ability as an essential health practitioner. Code of ethics 
of the American Pfiarmaceutical Assoc. 



B - We have changed the physical arrangement of our prescription department so our pharmacists will 
ALWAYS be available as your PERSONAL CONSULTANT for prescribed rtiedications and all your health needs. 

C - A pharmacist w\\\ PERSONALLY receive your prescription order 
. whether you bring it in or phone it in. 

D - The pharmacist will review with you your PATIENT MEDICATION 
PROFILE . We shall maintain such a record for every person having 
his prescriptions filled at Bayside Pharmacy. 

E - The pharmacist will check your prescription order with your 
medication record, watching for drug interactions with prescription 
and non-prescription medicines you may be taking, and drugs to 
which you maybe allergic. He will consult your physician if he finds 
a conflict. 







F - Your prescription wilt be prepared as promptly as possible and carefully checked. 

G - A pharmacist will discuss the finished prescription with you. He will indicate how the medicine is to be 
token or used; how to prof^rly store it; what medicines, food or beverages should not be taken with it; 
and any activities to be ovoided while taking it. 

H - V/e shall deliver the prescription and communicate this information by phone or note, if it is not 
possible to consult you personally. 



I ■ Our pharmacists will keep well informed and refresh their knowledge by programs of continuing 
education. 



As the guardians of your health - Bayside Phormocy will do its best to make 1 974 a healthy year for you and your family. 



PHARMACY PHONeS 
464-2711 
464-1463 




PHARMACY 



BAVSIDE t SHOPPING CENTER 
&DN UMn A PfaHMt HouM Rd. 



PHARMACY HOURS 
Mon. thru Sat. 9 o.ifi. to 9;30 pjn. 



I 



Overcrowded schools continued 
to plague the school board in '73 



By DONNA HENDRICK 
Sun Staff Writer 

Tl^e biggest job facing the Virginia 
Beach School Board in 1973 was the 
ever increasing problem of coping with 
the city's rapidly growing school 
population. 

More than 52,000 students are at- 
tending the city's 49 public schools. A 
report issued recently by the schools' 
research departments shows that 
Virginia Beach schools are ac- 
commodating aUnost 8,500 students 
over capacity. 

Tlie student population was increased 
last year by the addition of kin- 
dergarten classes, which swelled the 
total number of student in the public 
school system by almost 3,000 and by 
the closings of military basis in other 
parts of the country. 

The Southeastern Virginia Planning 
District Commission estimates that 
12,000 Navy personnel and families will 
eventually move to Virginia Beach 
because of the base closures. However, 
there are no accurate estimates 
available of the number of school age 
children moving here or what grade 
level they will be. 

TO HANDLE the growing student 
population, the school board started an 
experiment in year round education in 
four elementary schools and initiated 
various construction and expansion 
projects. 

45-15 

The Virginia Beach 45-lll pilot 
program in year round education 
enables four elementary schools in the 
Princess Anne Plaza area to ac- 
comodate a number of students over 
capacity since one-quarter of the 
students are on vacation at all times. 

The program, started this summer, is 



— Update 

Virginia Beach schoi^s closed out 
1973 operating at over-capacity. Sun 
Staff Writer Donna Hendrick examines 
the impact of that problem and explains 
new programs put into effect last year by 
tiie Virginia Beach School Board. 



called "45-15" because students attend 
classes for 4^ school days, then ar6 on 
vacation for IS school days. The 45-15 
cycle continues year round with four 
cycles equaling a normal school year. 
Approximately 5,000 students attend 
school on the 45-15 plan at Windsor 
Woods, Windsor Oaks, Plaza, and 
HoUaiid elementary schools. 

Kindergarten 

In March, the Virginia Beach School 
Board approved a plan to start kin- 
dergarten in the fall of 1973 The board 
had previously voted to initiate the 
kindergarten program in 1974 but 
started it last year to take advantage of 
full funding from the state. 

The Standards of Quality and 
Objectives for Public Schools in 
Virginia, enacted by the state 
legislature when the constitution was 
revised in 1971, calls for all of the 
state's school systems to submit plans 
for new kindergarten programs by this 
year, with, 1976 as the latest acceptable 
date for all school divisions to start 
their kindergarten programs. 

Virginia Beach's kindergarten 
program is free to all children who 
were 5 years old by Nov. 1. Children are 
not required to attend kindergarten, 
however, since Virginia's compulsory 



school attendance law applies only to 
children between the ages of 6 and 17. 

Expenses 

Parents of school age children 
received a financial break in one 
respect from the school board in 1973 
whoi a textbook reital plan was 
started, but many parents had to 
assume additional expenses when 
school lunch prices were increased. 

When the school year started in 
September, parents of elementary 
school age children were allowed to 
rent textbooks instead of buying them. 
City council authorized the school- 
board in April to use $190,000 in state 
funds to initiate the book rental 
program. 

Rising foo^ prices compelled the 
school board to vote a five-cent in- 
crease in all school lunches in August. 
Lunches in elementary schools went 
from 30 to 35 cents and lunches offered 
in secondary schools increased from 35 
to 40 cents. 

Energy 

The year was almost over when the 
school bbardr as well as every con- 
cerned consumer in the nation, realized 
the impact of the energy shortage and 
initiated plans to cut down on energy 
use to conserve dwindling supplies of 
gasoline, heating oil and other fuels. 

In November, the school board issued 
guidelines for conserving fuel and 
energy in the schools, including 
lowering thermostats to the 68 to 72 
degree range, turning off unnecessary 
lights and keeping windows and doors 
closed. 

The following month, a school energy 
conservation committee recommended 
lowering thermostats even more, to the, 
65 to 68 degree range. 




The city's 49th public school. College 
Park Elementary, opened in September to 



serve 900 students in Ifempsville Borough. 
(Sun staff photo) 



Conslrnction 



The city's newest public school. 
College Park Elementary, opened in 
September for classes and was for- 
mally dedicated in November. Funds 
for the new school came from a $12.6 
million bond issue approved by voters 
in 1972. 

Three new junior high schools started 
construction in 1973, also using funds 
from the 1972 bond issue. They are 
scheduled to open by the^start of the 
1974-75 school year. The three new 
schools, expected to accommodate 
approximately 1,400 students, are 
Independence, Princess Anne and 
Lynnhaven Junior High Schools. 

After planning for some time to build 
an elementary school in the Cahip 



I^oidleton area to serve students of 
Navy families, the school board instead 
voted in November to build the school 
on North Landing Road near the 
Virginia Beach Vocational-Technical 
Center. 

The board will continue to try to 
secure an elementary school site in the 
Pendleton area and plans for a new 
school there may become reality in 
1974. 

The city's so-called "growth 
corridor," essentially contained in 
Kempsville Borough, continues to 
contribute to overcrowding in Virginia 
Beach schools. To help alleviate this 
situation, the school board voted in 
September to purchase a site for an 
elementary school in the Fairfield area 
of the borough. The $100,000 site will be 
used for construction of a building to 
serve elementary school age chili"en 



ah-eady hving in the 'Fairfield sub- 
division or expected to move there. 

In addition to construction started or 
completed in 1973, the board also ap- 
proved expansion of two elementary 
schools to serve approximately 250 
more students each. 

Bayside and Hermitage Elementary . 
Schools will both be enlarged and 
improved. Bayside will have an ad- 
ditional wing, consisting of eight 
classrooms, an administrative office 
and a clinic and library. Bayside's 
cafeteria will be enlarged and existing 
offices will be converted to resource 
rooms. 

Hermitage will receive eight ad- 
ditional classrooms, plus will have 
enlarged administrative offices and 
library. 

Bids for expansion of the two schools 
will be let later this month. 




BEACH 

OFFICE 
MACHINES 

• SALES • SERVICE 
• RENTALS 

TYPEWRITERS & ADDING MACHINES 
Complete Selection Of Office Supplies 
316 London Bridge Center 
4861204 



Navy ships in more Beach population 



By LES LEHIGH 
Sun Staff Writer 

The transfer of Navy per- 
sonnel to tidewater from 
thi-oughout the United States 
virtually assured the con- 
tinuance . of a booming 
population growth in Virginia 
Beacl). Operations were in- 
creased at Naval bases located 
in the city, but the Army made 
reductions at Ft. Story. 

The Navy's transfer of 13 
ships and four, commands to 



Tidewater from throjughout 
United States also meant an 
estimated 16,000 men, women 
and children would be moving 
into the area. The Southeastern 
Virginia Planning District 
Commission (SVPDC) 
estimates 12,000 of these will 
eventually establish residence 
in Virginia Beach. 

As the announcement of the 
transfers was made, city of- 
ficials began operations to 
provide additional housing, 
schools, and water and 



^ I 



VIRGINIA BEACH CITY 
PUBLIC SCHOOLS 

ADULT EDUCATION EVENING COURSES 

1973 ■ 1974 



Second Semester Registration 



PRINCESS ANNE HIGH SCHOOL: 

Registration • January 21, 1974 

7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. - Monday & Wednesday 

Refresher English 
Spanish (Refreshn only) 
Beginning Typing (Refresher only) 
Advanced l^ing (Refresher only) 

8:30 p.m. to 10 p.m. ■ Monday & Wednesday 

Beginning Typing (Refresher only) 
Beginning Shorthand (iCefresher only) 
Personal Typing / 

Refresher Math j 

Offlce Machines (Refresper only) 
7 p.m. • 10 p.m. 



VOCATIONAL-TECHNICAL EDUCATIONAL CENTER; 



Registration - January 22, 1974 
7 p.m. to 10 p.m. • 



Advance Sewing • Knits (Monday only) 
Beginning Dressmaking (Wednesday only) 
Crafts (Monday or Wednesday) 



Advanced Typing 

Data Processing (Key Punch) 

Clerical Accounting 

Machine Transcription 

Steno Block 

Air Conditioning & Refrigeration (Basic 

Tlieory Required) 
Auto Machanics (Front End Alignment) 
Carpentry (Cabinet Making) 
Basic Photography 
Drafting 
Electronics 
Machine Shop 
Masonry 
Plumbing 
Small Engines 
Welding 
Horticulture 
Beginning Typing 



sewerage facilities which would 
be required. Private 
businessmen, such as traitors 
and developers, combined 
their forces to assist in meeting 
the increased demands for 
housing. 

OPERATIONAL INCREA- 
SES at the Little Creek Naval 
Amphibious Base included 
establishment of five new 
commands. The base also 
became a minesweeper 
homeport for the first time 
since 1968. The USS Exploit was 
reassigned to the base, with a 
primary purpose of training 
naval reservists. 

Initiation of several new 



programs increased 
capabilities at the Navy's Fleet 
Combat Direction System 
Trainug Center, Atlantic, at 
Dam Neck. One of these in- 
volves training men who would 
direct offensive or defensive 
operations on board ships in the 
event of hostile engagements. 
Another new program is the 
training of men who will be 
assigned to land base stations 
where activities of naval air- 
craft squadrons are coordinated 
in operations against hostile 
forces. 

These new programs 
necessitated additions to Fleet 
Composite Squadron VC-2 at 
Navar ATf Station (NAS) 



1 



Update 



Military transfers could add an estirtutted 12,000 persons to 
the Virginia Beach population total by the end of 19 74. Sun Staff 
Writer Les Lehigh traces the movement of military personnel in- 
to Tidewater and reports on the operational changes at Beach mili- 
tary bases. 



Oceana. The squadron's reduced by nearly 50 percenii^ 
mission involves flying aircraft and a majority of the remainder 
in exercises for training of was transferred to Ft. Eustis. 
radar operators at Dam Neck in These realignmer^ts had 
the* itfentification and ln-."i|iBffect on military access tOl 
terception of enemy aircraft. Story beaches for use in at,, 

phibious training and testinj^ ; 



ai^ 



Contractors 
Paving 

Company 



SQUADRON VC-2'S strength 
was increased by nearly 300 
additional naval personnel, and 
100 dependents. Citing reasons 
of security, officials declined 
comment on the number of 
additional aircraft assigned to 
the Squadron. 




The following courses will also be registering on January 21, 1974, at the indicated locations. Bayside High School: BASIC 
WOODSHOP (Monday or Wednesday - 7 p.m. to 10 p.m.); Kempsville High School: GERMAN I (Refresher only, Monday 
and Wednesday ■ 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m.), CRAFTS (Monday or Thursday ■ 7 p.m. to 10 p.m.); and BASIC WOODSHOP 
(Monday or Wednesday - 7 p.m. to 10 p.m.); First Colonial High School; BASIC WOODSHOP (Monday or Wednesday. 7 
p.m. to 10 p.m.). 

PRE-REGISTRATION for AUTO MECHANICS will be held at Bayside High School on January 14 and 16, 1974. Claaes 
D^*^" **"y °' Wednesday evening from 7 p.m. to 10 p.m. Also, pre-registration for UPHOLSTERY and FURNITURE 
REPAIR AND REFINISHING wfll be held at the Center for Effective Uaming on January 17, 1974, from 9 a.m. I» 4 p.m. 
pay dasws wiU meet Monday through Friday 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Evening classes meet Monday and Wednesday evenings 7 p.m. 
to 10 p.m. 



The ADULT LEARNING CENTER At 233 N. Witchduck Road provides a comprehensive adult school program, covering 
frates 1>8, awl also includes instouction|| programs to prepare applicants for the G.E.D., high school completion) test. In 
addition, th«e are facilities and insbvctiors to help foreign-born individuals with the English langui^e ami to prepare them to 
beeoiTO citizens. No tuition is charged to attend the Center, which operats free days per week, Monday through Friday, 
8:M a.111. to 3:M p.m. and Monday through Thursday, 7 p.m. to S p.m. 



TOmON: Virginia Beach ResidenU - $5 par semester; Non-readenU ~ $10 sanester (Mort Vocational courses also 
■we a fee f<w matCTUs); there is no tuition for senior citizens over 60 years of age attending evening eouisn. 

FOR ADDITIONAL INFORMATION ABOUT THE VIRGINIA BEACH 
PUBLIC SCHOOL ADULT EDUCATION PROGRAM CALL 427-4151 
BETWEEN 8:30 a.m. and 4:a) p.m. MONDAY THROUGH FRIDAY 



Concrete Paving 

Curbs 
and 

Sidewalks 




The program to reduce 
operating costs of military 
installations caused the 
reduction of training and base 
operations at Ft. Story, along 
with the transfer of certain 
Strategic Army Force Units to 
Ft. Eustis. The mihtary and 
civilian forces at the base were 



The U.S. Navy also showed 
increased interest in Ft. Stoqr 
facilities. The Navy requested 
use of a 79-acre site on Ft. Storj/' 
for construction of 600 family 
housing units to relieve serious 
housing shortages for military 
personnel in Virginia Beach and 
Norfolk. A,_ 



An interservice suppoHl 
agreement was also conclude^ 
with the Navy t» 
assume maintenance and repav 
responsibility for all rea 
property at Ft. Story, thi 
eliminating any dual main 
tenance responsibility. 





On Its 
11th Birthday 

Herbert Harrell 
Floriat 

J 1041 Laskin Rd. 428-8732 




PAVING THE WAY 
FOR THE nJTURE 

We are pnmd to play a pah in the 
growth of this city 

'■ . ^ ^angratulations 

illtk » 



Va. Beach ^ 
You 're growing fine 





^^w«*^ 




TRAVEL HOUSE 



OF VIRGINIA. INC. 




f^ JIth ^ 

Itineraries? Travel, 
Hotel Arrangements? 
We take care of all 
that. All you decide 
is where you want 
to go. 



3500 Va. Beach Bhrd. 

340-3403 

Quises 

Caribbean 

Europe 



Congratulations 
To The City Of 
Virginia Beach On 
The 11 til Anniversary 
Of Annexation . . . 



Airlinu 
Tickets & 
Reservations 




732 Hilltop North 
425-3030 



Tours 
Individual 
Or Group 




The Sun-Wednesday, January 16, 1974-Pa9> A-7 



Airport dedication, 
tours set for Friday 



Formal deditation ceremonies for the new 
Norfolk Regional Airport will be held at 11 
a.m. Friday in the new air terminal building. 
Alttwugh the airport was originally scheduled 
to be open for air travel service Monday, 
construction on the terminal building is not 
complete yet, and airport officials are now 
hoping to begin regular air flights froih the 
facility sometime after Monday. 

Speaking at Friday's dedication 
ceremonies will be Rep. G. William 
Whitehurst and Norfolk Mayor Roy B. Martin 
Jr. James J. Gara, chairman of the Norfolk 
Port and Industrial Authority, which owns 
and operates the air facility, will preside over 



the dedication ceremony. 

During the two-day open house, the new air 
terminal also will house several displays. 
NASA is providing displays including a look 
at a lunar sample that was collected. by the 
Apollo II crew in the Seii of Tranquility, a 
display showing NASA's research and 
development in aeronautics, a full-size 
replica of the lunar space suit worn by 
astronauts whe| walking on the moon and 
scale modes of t|e space shuttle and the scout 
launch vehicle. The Flying Circus of Northern 
Virginia, a company of antique aircraft en- 
thusiasts, also will display five of Iheir crafts 
^turday. 






K VIEW FROM THE AIR OF tHE NEW Norfolk 
Regional Airport shows tlie airport's two 
concourses attached to the main terminal 
htiildihg. With 12 arrival-departure gates, the 



new facility is equipped to handle the area's 
annual average of 1.3 million passengers' with 
nians for future expansion. 



New airport built to end headaches 



By LINDA MILLER 
Sun Staff Writer 

If you picked up passiengers 
or caught a flight out from the 
old Norfolk Regional Airport 
over the holidays, you know 
what it's like to wait 30 minutes 
for a parking place, to battle for 
a piece of the sidewalk and to 
wait for your baggage to come 
off the plane. The opening of the 
New Norfolk Regional Airport, 
still scheduled for Monday, but 
with much work remaining 
should put a stop to some of 
those headaches. 

The new $30 million airport 
will be directly across one 
runway from the old airport, 
but will offer greater con- 
veniences than users of the old 
airport coidd ever imagine. 
Everything from nursery ac- 
comodations for the child who 
needs a change to dining 
facilities will be at the travelers 
disposal while at the airport. 

"The airport was actually built 
into the Gardens-by-the Sea, 
gSite of the annual International 
Azelea Festival. More than 
8,000 ^azaleas, camellias and 
rhododendrons were tranS;, 
idanted in new flower beds to 
make room for the ..alcport 
facilities. A special earth berm 
ledge was built up along the 
perimeter of the airport to 
reduce the noise intrusion from 
air traffic into the gardens. 



THE NEW airport is 
arranged so as to separate those 
persons trying to get tickets for 
a flight and those at the airport 
to pick up arriving passengers. 
If you are taking a flight out of 
Norfolk Regional, you will use 
the southwest, or "departure" 
side of the terminal. When 
arriving at the airport, you will 
be using the northwest, or 
"qrrival"side of the building. 
The four ticket counters (for 
National, Allegheny, United and 
Piedmont airlines) are all 
located on the "departure" 
side. The four electrically-, 
operated baggage conveyors 
are located on the "arrival" 
side. (Airline ticketing areas, 
like the rest of the airport, were 
designed to accomodate future 
growth with space to double in 
size when n^essary.) 

Escalators will take travelers 
to and from the two areas to the 
second floor main lobby. The 
lobby is arranged much like a 
shopping mall, with restaurant 
and shops surrounding the 
lounge area. Included in the 
"mall" will be a bank, a barber 
shop, a newsstand and gift shop, 
as well as restroom facilities. 

Extending from the second 
floor lobby are the two con- 
courses, or "arms" which 
passengers will use when 
boarding flints. A total of 12 




ticket gates are housed on the 
two concourses.; National and 
Piedmont flights will originate 
from Concourse A, and flights 
on Allegheny and United will 
have gdtes on Concourse B. 
Passengers will be subjected to 
security procedures before 
entering either concourse. 

UPON ENTERING the 

concourse, travelers will find a 
smaller waiting area at their 
appropriate ticket gate. Special 
loading bridges will permit 
passengers to proceed directly 
from the airline boarding 
lounges into the aircraft cabins 
without going outside the ter- 
minal. 

The airport also has been 
designed with the elderly and 
haridUcapped in mind. Specially 
built facilities include ramps to 
accomodate wheelchairs at 
curbside and in the parking lots, 
elevators, low-level telephones, 
and restroom facilities 
specially-equipped for 
wheelchairs. 

The entire airport terminal 
(everything from the bronze- 
tinted windows to the teak-wood 
paneling around the lobby 
ceiling) is decorated in bronze 
and beige colors, or what air- 
port designers call "earth" 
tones. "Hie new facility also will 
have a special type of lighting 
and a loud speaker system 
geared to the noise level of the 
airport. The lighting, designed 
to be easy on the eyei, will be a 
combination of Luc-a-Lux (a 
special soft lighting), in- 
candescent and fluprescent 
lighting. Sound "sensors", 
located throughout the terminal 



and concourses, "listen" to 
each individual room and adapt 
the flight announcements over 
the loud speaker to the noise 
level of the area. 

The parking area, both long 
and short term, has a total of 360 
parking spaces and is adaptable 
to multi-deck parking service 
for future growth. The new 
approach road to the air 
facilities being built by the 
Virginia Department of High- 
ways will connect with the in- 
terstate, but will not be ready 
for use until 1975. Passengers 
will have to continue to use the 
access road that goes to the old 
terminal off the Interstate 64 
exit at Military Circle Highway. 

All of the air facilities are 
financed, operated and 
maintained by the Norfolk Port„ 
and Industrial Authority, a 
political subdivision of the 
Commonwealth of Virginia. The 
five commissioners on the 
authority's board, headed by 
James J. Gara, are appointed 
by the Norfolk City Cduncil. 
Construction of the new airport, 
which began in 1971, was 
flnanced by the sale of $26.5 
million in Airport Revenue 
Bonds by the authority. The 
bonds will be paid off through a 
use agreement with the four 
airlines using the facilities and 
by funds gained through 
revenue-producing air travel 
service of the airport. An ad- 
ditional $5 million in con- 
struction funds was provided by 
the Federal Aviation 
Administration under the 1970 
Airport Development Aid 
Program. 



DIFFUSED LlfiHT filters through the high 
cofferpd ceiling of the second floor lobby of the 
new Norfolk Regional Airport while wwkmen 
work to complete the interior of the building 
for Thursday's dedication ceremonies. (Sun 
ohoto hv Neal Sims) 





^A-AIRPORT LIMOUSINE 



SERVICE 



24 HOUR SBRViCB 

TO AND FROM NORFOLK REGIONAL AIRPORT 



LIMOUSINES 

AEROBUSES 

38 i 41 

PASSENGER 

BUSES 

AVAILABLE 

FOR YOUR COMFORT 

t CONVENIENCE TO ' 

S FROM 

REGIONAL AIRPORT 



SCHEOUUO OEPARTURES FROM 
NOKFOLK NAVAL lASE 

ON THE HOUR 
HOUH.Y S A.M. TO t >.M, 
ON CALL i fM. TO 10 P.M. 




if ONCALL DEPARTURES 
FROM VIRGINIA BEACH 
RESORT MOTELS AND 
DOWNTOWN 
PORTSMOUTH 



853-0521 



131 CSC H Construction Corporation 



Asphalt 



Highway Co ntrattor% 



Concrete 



O. M. BIKSai. amlmini»Mii 
W. B. SIVrTER, fn H dmi 
R. E. DALTON, Eaaitmx Vict ftoAm 
M. J.>EROUSON. Tr«o«if«r 




Tet^one 627-0401 
POST OFRCE BOX 12479 
NORFOLK. VIRGINIA 23502 



Congratulations 



••••• 




Vii«*i*ft, 



II th 





'^'^^hliff^^ 



i-ftahitihed l>m "Fw Bi'iih Iknet Cimifrvi nun" 







A POWER TOOL 
FOR EVERY JOB 



AYLOR 
RENTAL 



3825 Bonney Rd. 
(Located Near Moore's 
. QMS. Supply) 

340-0908 




AND TO THE 

NORFOLK REGIONAL AIRPORT 

ON YOUR DEDICATION JANUARY 18, 1^74 




Cmgratulatms 



CITY OF NORFOLK 

ON YOUR NEW MUNICIPAL AIRPORT 



We are proud to have supplied contractor! In ttie Tidewater area with lome 
of the construction equipment that helped bujid this new airport . . . INTER- 
NATIONAL CRAWLER TRACTORS' INTERNATIONAL PAYSCRAPERS, 
HOUGH PAY-LOADERS, GALION ROLLERS, NORTHWEST CRANES and 
CEDAR API DS ASPHALT PLANTS. Congratulations also tc Higgerson- Buch- 
anan, Inc., Birsch Construction Company, Basic Construction Company, 
Johnson"* JoNlff, Inc., Ames & Webb, Inc. and other contractors for the 
fine job they have done. Whatever the contruction project, Hampton Roads 
Tractor & Equipment Company can supply the equipment to get the job done 
at the lowest possible cost. When you need C0NSTRUCTION,'INDUSTRIAL 
And LOGGING EQUIPMENT, remember HAMPTON ROADS TRACTOR 
— we can help you. . ~ 



(i5^-i 



In. 



iNTEitiyinoiyy: 

CilllfflMiCflOll^lQIilPllWIT 



HAMPTON ROADS TRACTOR & EQUIPMENT COMPANY 



^0t0tm0t0^0^^^m^^0^^i^^^^^^^^»^i^^^^>^^ ^ ^^ 



W. 39th Street and Killam Avenue/ P.O.Box 237 
—. HORFOIK, VIRGINIA 23501 



mmwmwnama 



jm^»,^>^M» m w i. i . m iwiiM ■ ■■w i" ^^ * i" tf M^^* "w *^^*'*'i* ' i* " *i 



^^^M^W <i^liJ»^l^«l^l#<^^ 




Pn* A-8-The Sun-Wedfwsd»y, January 16, 1974 



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Evening ft Sunday C^dls Made 



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FAMOUS CHINESE & AlvlERICAN FOOD 

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fr'ivate Dining Room For Banquofs S PmHtt 

VISIT OUR GIFT COUNTERS » 

. Member of Diners Club & BANKAueucAnD 

COCKTAILS . 

DIAL 



855-6761 



1317 N. milita:{y highway route 13 

ktwaen Laiwdtl* Traffic CircU t Virginia laaeh IM. Near Ne» Sfa^iim 



Pianist flislia Dicliter will present an all- 
Reetlinvdn program Friday at 8:30 p.m. at the 
f.alte Tajiflor Higli School auditorium in the 
third concert of the season sponsored by the 
Vircrinia Beach Friends of Music. Tickets, 
available at the door, are $4 for adults and |2 
for students. 




^ Hamburger 
Ground Fresh Daily Delicious 
EaUCbSoUSB Pastries Baked Dirily In Our 
Beimra^ Own Ovens 

-Breakfqst-Lunch-Dinner- 

Watch For Our Opening Of 
Our New Location In 
CHESAPEAKE 

3212 Western Brancli Blvd. 

. > OPEN: 7 A.M. 

550 Independence Blvd. 2859 Va. Beach Blvd, 

499-2860 340-1041 

14745 Warrvyick Blvd. Newport News 



MISSCASHMAN 



Cashman 
engagement 



Mr. and Mrs. Charles William 
Cashman Jr. <rf Virginia Beach 
announce the engagemoit of 
their daughter, Barbara Lbu^ 
Cashman, to Hoyt Lytle Duff II, ' 
son of Capt. and Mrs. Hoyt Lytle 
Duff of Virginia Beach. 

■nie bride- to- be is a graduate 



MRS. POWELL 



of Cox High School and Princess 
Anne business college. She is 
employed at the Virginia .Beach 
Service Center. Her fiance is a 
graduate of Cox High School 
and attends Cornell University, 
Ithaca, N. Y., where he is a 
member of Delta Tau Delta 
fraternity. 

A May 24 wedding is planned 
in Virginia Beach. 



Powell-Weiler 



only one shop i 
Vfa^inla Beach, this 
should be the one! 



Nautical Lamps ^^^irJ^t 
Hatch Cover 

Tables 
Ship's Wheels 




We Are Happy to Extend Our 

CONGRATULATIONS.... 

totheGityof 
Virginia 



^^ J I til 





Keach 




on its nth ANNIVERSARY 

SHOW YOUR COLORS 
AUTO ANTENNA FLAGS 

(Flags are 4" x 6" with Gold Fringe-Color Fast) 

IMMEDIATE DELIVERY 



1 .000 
ADDRESS LABELS 

(3 lines per label) 

Mailed Only to Address on Labels 
Be Sure to Print 
Give Zip Code 

(Allow 6 to 8 weeks for delivery of Labels) 

MAIL ORDERS TO: 

DOUBLE "G" ENTERPRISES 

RO Box 572. 
Virginia Beach, Va. 23451 

Prices Shown include tax and Postage 

on all items. 

Special Pmn to Organizatiotn 
Whon purchand in large lots. 
Write fw ^i9cM large lot 
price pving atkirea and phwie number. 




BCOMEW 




NEW PROGRAMS 

Tmie on your hanib? Want 
to avoid the 9 to 5 job? 
Maiie it amount to some- 
thing!! Start off the New 
Year with a career with 




Th Hest FaiMB tokd n Ike WorM ^ 

Exciting, challenging new 
programs available for you. 
Pleasant neighborhood 
car^r, car required, sales 
andconununity background 
helpful, will train. CALL 
NOW for more information 
340-1234 or 340-J131 

Marilyn Mitchell 
Field Muiaga 




MISS ETHERIDGE 



Toni Lynne Weller and Kevin 
Eugene Powell were wed 
Friday at St. Francis Episcopal 
Church. 

The bride is the (taughter of 
Lt Cmdr. and Mrs. Edward E. 
Weller of Virginia Beach. The 
bridegroom is the son of Mr. 
and Mrs. Whitfield S. Moore of 
Chesapeake. 

Terri Glynn Weller was her 
sister's maid of honor. 
Bridesmaids were Rtbbecca Ann 
Sever, Ann Moore, Ann Monroe 
and Lisa Grable. 

Archibald Morse III was best 
man. Ushers were John K. 
Kloster, David Ryan, James 
Bishop and Clarice Chase. 

The couple will reside in 
Willaimsburg. 



Etheridge 
engagement 



Mr. and Mrs. Marvin Lee 
Etheridge (rf Virginia Beach 
announce the engagment of 
their daughter, Marlene 
Etheridge, to Harry Maurice 
Lange of Nags Head, N.C., son 
d Mr. and Mrs. Harry Davis 
Lange of Buxton, N.C. 

The bride-to-be is a graduate 
d Kellam High School and is 
employed by Pacific Ordnance 
& Electronics Co. 

Her fiance is a graduate of 
Cape Hatteras High School and 
East Carolina University. He is 
employed by the town of Nags 
Head. 



A March 30 wedding 
planned in Virginia Beach. 



IS 



MISS GALLOP 



Gallop 
engagement 



Mr. and Mrs. Herrel L. Gallop 
of Virginia Beach announce the 
oigagement of their daughter, 
Laura Alethea Gallop, to Glenn 
Allison Scott, son ot Mr, and 
Mrs. Thomas Mays Scott of 
Chesapeake. 

The bride-to-be is a graduate 
of Bayside High School and is 
employed by the Virginia Brach 
public library system. 

Her fiance is a graduate' of 
Deep Creek High School and is 
employed by ^ Norfolk 
Shipbuilding and Drydodc Ccxp. 

Nov>redding date has been set. 



Sears 
engagement 



Mr. and Mrs. Kenneth B. ; 
Sears of Virginia Beach ' 
announce the engagement of '; 
their daughter, Terry Lee 
Sears, to Steven George Kona '. 
Jr., son of Mr. and Mrs. Steven 
Gewge Kona Sr. of Virginis^^ 
Beach. 

The bride-to-be is a graduate ' 
of Princess Anne High School 
and is currently employed in the 
classified advertising 
department of The Sun. 

Her fiance is also a graduate 
of Princess Anne High School 
and is employed by R.G. ' 
Andrews Construction Co. 

A July wedding is planned in ' 
Virginia Bach. 



428-8500 

VIRGINIA BEACH- 
2407 Pacific Ave. 

Telephone Answ«hig 
Service Co. 



{<€zyM-<ly 



Oit..^OH 



BEAl 1\ SAIONS 



Shampoo & Set From $3.25 

Complete Permanent Waves...... ..$6.95 fo $19.95 

Roux Fanci-Tone Touch-up From $5.00 

Roux Frosting (Shampoo & Set Extra) $12.50 

Haircut $2.75 

'yVo Afrfjuiiilment i\ccessary-Just Come In 
DAILY -9 'til 6 THURS. - 9 'til 9 



Hilltop Ptazi Shopping Center 
Laskin Rd. Next to Safeway 
Phone: 428-9897 
Va. Beac'i 



5118 Va. Beach-TMvd. 
-Across from GEX 
Phono: 497-9769 
Va. Boach 



1734 E. 

Little Creek Rd. 

Next to Zayres 

Phone: 588-9093 

Norfolk 




DON'T BUY A GUITAR 
FOft BEGINNERS -until 
you see Tony, or rent on^ 
with lessons. 



! "Ama/iMti instant g>iitar course. The 
new way! The quick way! 



Free ability test 
Enrollment Limited 



Home of world championship contest 
winners. 
Home of the famous Beatle Guitar. 



TONY SAKS ■ GUITARLANB 



5033 Virgir^ia Beach Blvd. 
499-8909 



One block east o( 
Chinese Corner 



pUnii 



425-9335 



" 'oriental ARTS & CURIOS 

HOURS: 10 a.m. It) 5:00 p.Bk 
CLOSED SUN. & MON. 



716 FIRST COLUNIAL 
HILLTOP WKST 

(Ktfhind Mil)<inald.<>un 1 a.skin Kii.) 



Evelyn s children's shop 

211 - 25th ST.. VIRGINIA BEACH. VA. PHONE 428-1761 
SEaVING VIRGINIA BEACH FAMILIES SINCE 1956 




Choose a great kind of a look in famou! 
maker dresses, suits, crib sets, skirts. ^ 
shirts, slacks, pant suits or sleepwear,.... 
Easy care, easy v»«ar clothing for girls 
and boys, babies to teens. 




WE'LL BE HAPPY TO HELP YOU WITH 
SIZE AND SELECTION. 



mmmmt 



Th« Sun-Wednesday, January 16, 1974-Page A-9 



I 




FOR THE FUTURE 

"SHIP OF FOOLS." a film in 
the Chrysler Museum at 
NorioDc adult film series, will be 
shown tonight at 8 at the 
theatre, Olney Road and 
Mowbray Arch. Ticket 
i^onnation may be obtained 
from the theatre at 622-1211. 

r PHOTOGRAPHS which won 
^wards from the Virginia News 
Photographers Assn. annual 
omnpetilion are now on display 
at the Chrysler Museum at 
itodolk, flurough Feb. 10. The 
photo exhibit, sponsored by the 
Virginian-Pilot and Ledger- 
Star, is open free to the public. 

PHOTOTIPS will be offered 
in a five-wed( course taught by 
Virginia Beach photographer 
James R. Hysong starting 
Wednesday at Tidewater 
Community* ''Col lege' s 
Chesapeake campus. The 
course costs $17.50 and will last 
from 7 to 9 p.m. each 
Wednesday. Registration 
information may be obtained by 
phoning 547-4515. 

CLASSICAL MUSIC will 
come to the Frederick .Campus 
of Tidewater Community 
College Thursday when the 
Feldman String Quartet 
presents a free concert at 12:30 
p.m. in the college's music hall. 
The program is part of a series 
of midday concerts presented 
by the college. 

"THE EMPEROR'S NEW 
CLOTHES," a play for both 
children and adults, will be 
■presente(l by the Chesapeake 
Little Theatre Friday at 8:15 
p.m. and Saturday at 2:15 p.m. 
and 8:15 p.m. in the Indian 
River Junior High School annex 
auditorium. Admission is 50 
cents and tickets will be 
available at the door. 

WOMEN IN COM- 

MUNICATIONS, a new 
group formed in the Tidewater 
area, will hold its third meeting 
Friday at 6i30 p.m. at the 
Hampton Redevelopment and 
Housing , Authority, on King 
Street in Hampton. All working 
women in communications are 
invited to attend. 

IMOGENE COCA will star as 
Edna Edison in the touring 
version of the Broadway 
comedy, "The Prisoner of 
Seccmd Avenue," Friday and 
Saturday at the Chrysler Hall 
Theatre, Nwfolk. Ms. Coca's 
husband, King Donovan, will co- 
star as the "prisoner.", Tidtet 
information may be obtained 
from the theatre, 441-2764. 

» NON-CREDIT COURSES in 

health, recreation and safety 
will begin Monday in the Old 
Dominion University Boundy 
Program. Fees for various 
courses range, from $6 to $140. 
Courses are offered to both 
children and adults. 
Registration information may 
be obtained from Lew D. 
DerricksOTi, Boundy Program 
director, at 489-8000, ext. 291 
and 292. 

NAVY WIVES are invited to 
attend the Monday meeting of 
the Nimitz Enlisted Wives* Club 
at 7 p.m. in the Ship 'n Shore 
Wives' Club on the Naval 
Operations Base, Norfolk. 
Installation of new (rfficers and 
a business meeting will be 
included. Additional 
information may be (Stained 
from Diane Konken at 583-8797. 

A RALLY FOR LIFE, 

sponsored by the Virginia 
Society for Human Life, will be 
held Tuesday from 10 a.m. to 
noon in front of the abortion 
clinic at 1600 E. Little Creek 



Road, Norfolk. At 7:30 p.m. that 
evening, the society will show a 
movie entitled "Abwtion — A 
Woman's Decision," at the 
public health auditorium, 401 
Colley Ayenue, Norfolk. 
Admission is free and qpen to 
the public. 

ART NOSTALGIA will be 
offered Jan. 23-25 when the 
Virginia Museum's Artmobile. 
collection or art nouveau is 
displayed at Virginia Wesleyan 
College. The traveling exhibit, 
open to the public at no charge, 
may be viewed on the campus 
from 2 to 6 p.m. Jan 23; 9 a.m. to 
noon, 1 to 5 p.m. and 7 to 9 p.m. 
Jan. 24, and 9 a.m. to noon Jan. 
25. 

ACTORS Rory Calhoun and 
Peter Breck will appear at 
Tidewater Dodge of Virginia 
Inc., 6440 N. Military Highway, 
Norfolk, on the afternoons of 
Jan. 23 and 24. The public is 
invited to meet the two actors 
during Tidewater Dodge's 
special sales promotion. 

POETS are invited to 
compete in the 50th annual 
poetry contest of the Poetry 
Society of Virginia. Contest 
rules may be obtained by 
sending a stamped, self- 
addressed envelope to the 
contest chairman, Mrs. Edward 
L. Hill, Poetry Society of 
Virginia, lSl8 Loch Lomraid 
Lane, Richmond, Va. 23221. The 
contest closes Feb. 1. 

FOa THE RECORD 

DOROTHY LATHAM was 
elected Member of the Month by 
members of the Navy Wives 
Clubs of America, Dam Neck 
No. 207, at their January 
business meeting. Plans fw a 
silver tea in conjunction with 
the organization's national 
scholarship, month, were 
completed. 

NEW OFFICERS were 
installed by tfie' Dam Neck 
Toastmasters Club Jan. 5. 
Installed were: president, 
Edward J. Primm; educational 
vice-president, David B. 
Linebaugh; administrative 



vice-president, Edward R. 
Roberson;' secretary, Ronald 
M. Griffin; treasurer, John J. 
Lineman, and sergeant-at- 
arms, Sonia Linebaugh. 

THE HOLIDAY SEASON was 
welcomed by members of the 
King's Grant Garden dub at a 
Christmas party held at the 
home of Mr. and Mrs. Edwin 
Parker. Club members and 
their husbands attended the 
nth' annual Christmas 
celebratioa 

AFRICAN POLITICS were 
discussed at the Jan. 10 meeting 
of Oie Cape Henry Woman's 
Chib when Janet Mays, who has 
done graduate study on 
international affairs in Ghana, 
addressed club members. In 
addition, club members heard 
Mrs. James's. Latham, editor 
of the Navy Wives News, 
discuss the work of Navy wives 
groups. 

VESTRY OFFICERS of St. 
Francis Episcopal Church, 509 
Rosemont Road, were elected 
during the vestry organization 
meeting Jan. 6. New officers 
are: senior warden, L. Ray 
Bowden; junior warden, 
Thomas L. Vaclavicek; 
registrar, Mary Singletary; 
treasurer, William T. 
Ashworth, and assistant 
treasurer, Anna F. Slantis. 
Other njembers of the vestry 
afe Kenneth B. Newcome, 
Robert F. Martin, David 
French, Martin Vick, Alton P. 
Stone Jr., Jack Rider and Joyce 
Lee. 

GENERAL HORTICULT- 
URE was discussed by Randy 
Jackson, VPI extension agent, 
at the monthly meeting of the 
Riverton Gardep Club. Flower 
arrangements submitted for 
judging were taken to residents 
of Hohnes Home by therapy 
chairman Sye Hobbs. 

Items may be submitted to 
Sun Dial by maiL Please mail your 
notice to Sun Dial, Virginia Beach 
Sun, 138 Rosemoni Road, Vir- 
ginia Beach, Va. 23452. Deadline 
is noon Friday prior to the week 
of publication. 



GEM 



486-7886 




SPECIALTIES 
. Unusual . 
Gemstone Items 

We Pay Top Price For 
Gold & Silver 

If We Don't Have What 

You Want-We'll Handcraft 

It For You 

"Jewelry is A Good Invesfment" 

3320 Va. Beach 

* _, , "Behind The 

Blvd. Stroud BIdg. 




^At^ 



Grafters Of Firje Handmade 
Leather Goods. Due to the 
Goodness Of the Lord, Our 
Business Has Prospered And 
Now We Wish To Extend This 
Blessing To The Public With 
A... 

SALE 

■PURSES- 

Were ^°^ 

.$13.00 $5.00 
$16.50 $7.50 
$25.00 $10.00 

10% Entire Stock 

Purses, Wallets, Belts. Coats, 
Jewelry, Barretts, Key Cases, 
Hats. 

341 KempprOe fbta 
5277 Princett Ame Rd. AcfMi 
Prom Numu TtopkM Ptanti 

10 •.m,-6 pJ*. 

497-9460 jtoB. s«t 




ERA has 

speakers 

available 



The^Tidewater OoaliUon for 
the Equal Ri^ts Amexfanrat 
has established a speakers 
bureau to tell inta«sted groiq;Mi 
why it feels ratification of the 
Equal Rights Amendment 
(ERA) is necessanr. 

The proposed ^th amend 
ment to the U.S. Constitution, 
known as the fiqual Ri^ts 
Ameodmoit, states, "Equality 
of rights under thelitw shall not 
be denied or abridged by the 
United States or by any sute on 
account of sex." 

As of December of last year, 
SO states had ratified the ERA. 
Ratification by eight mor^ 
states is necessary before th«| 
amendment becomes law. 

Virginia's General Assembly 
is expected to hear propositions 
for passage of the ERA during 
thia year's legislative session. 

Groups interested in joining I 
Tidewater Coalition for the ■ 



^ 



t0<Si 



AGEORGCnO/HltFiLM \^K 

TKESTXiVG . \^ 

ABOtUDDZANlOt 0M0KK>mrafSNIAnON 




DANflD S. VikRO • GEOf?GE ROY HIU ■ TONY B'Ll and MiCHAEl & JULIA PHILLIPS 

M.,.*, Aai. -.-!:,'.■■.". ■."-■■ ■ ■ rwwV"— .<■...>-<— .—.•;""" 

o*ii',*ii«wiiii««:»«wi*»n«uu»™i..o«-i»-*ii-i»«*'*"* i***l ■"■- 

4th RECORD BREAKING 

^MMMN IMMMlf 




WEEK 

FEATUflES ATI 
1:00-3:16 i:30'7:4S' 10:00 



IVLV IM> -III J J«P«, 



Arthur L Click, D.D.S. 

Aimom^ the removal 
otBeMceto 

Suite 103 
533 Newtown Road 
Virginia Bea<^, Va. 23462 
(at Lake Edward Apartments) 



Phone 
499-3 J 63 



Office Hours 
By Appointment 



LEARNING INTERNATIONAL 
THROUGH FAMILY EXPERIENCE 

Life-Is ihuring a U.S. Family Living Experience 
with an International Young Adult— For Five to 
Seveq^Hfeeks This Summer. An International 
Stud^t Service YWCA Program. For Applica- 
tion Call Mrs. Edwards 481-6862. 



\Ms hi \\\ U\ l( ilKl.WI/ \ I llN ilK ( III K< 



SIMIELE FUNERAL HOME 



\ III \\h \()()\ I III. 



Equal Rights Amendment are 
asked to call 3404)T74 for ad- 
ditional information. Groups 
interested in hearing speaker^ 
from the speaker's bureau ar| 
asked to call 623-0666. ^ , - 



Panel set 
for youth 
problems 

A panel discussion on youth 
problems will, be p^etented 
during the quarterly melting of 
the KeUam High School PTA, 
Thursday at 7:30 p.m. in the 
school auditorium. 

PaneUsts participating in the 
discussion will be Judge Ken- 
neth Whitehurst; Louise 
Friedman, acting social worker 
supervisor of the department of 
social services; a represen- 
tative of the city's juvenile 
probation department, and a 
representative of the police 
department's juvenile bureaiu. 

The public is invited to attend. 




RECORDS-TAPES 



U C«NC£t>t 



t 



Hilltop Plaza 
Va. Beach, Va. 
428-7481 ' 




SHEET MCrSfC 
music BOOKS 



to you, 

VIRGINIA BEACH, 
On Your 11th Anniversary! 

For beautifully distinctive ^t 
arrangements, corsages, fresh 
flowers, plants, etc., call 

B; sJ«'f HowW of ploWtff 
300 London Bridge Center 
,B. J. SCHWARTZ 340-4422 



riiinoRA 



After Sunset ^ 



Will you be 
Robbed? 

Burglarized? 
Raped?...virorse? 
The FBI says yesl 

The FBI has said that every- ' 
one of us will be a victim of 
a crime in our lifetime. It 
may be burglary, robbery, a 
mugging, a rape.. .or worse. 

Now you can protect your 
home and your family from 
drug addicts, robbers and 
other intruders With Ft>VSH- 
GUARD This all-new burglar 
alarm system brings effective 
protection within the reach 
of everyone. 

. For a fraction of the cost 
of good conventional alarm 
systems, FLASHGUARD pro- 
, tects every door and window 
through which an intruder 
might enter your home. 
FLASHGUARD can also pro- 
vide inexpensive fire alarm 
protection. 

For all the details, call or write: 

Jtashinnl 

1615 PACIFIC AVE. 
VIRGINIA BEACH 

425-1776 




High Spots 

at Night Spots 

in Tidewater 



lUs entire space (sonsists of paid advertising 



t 



NOW 

DANCING 6 
NIGHTS A WEEK 



LYNNHAVEN LOUNGE- 
The best in country rock bands 
now appear every night 
except Mondays at The 
Lynnliaven Lounge. Tuesday, 
Thursday & Sunday the 
Country Ravens appear; 
Wednesday, Friday and 
Saturday, The Atlantic 
Coastline. 

Open from 10 a.m. to 1 a.m.. 
The Lynnhaven Lounge 
is located at the Mini-Mall on 
South Lynnhaven Rd. Take 
Exits off the Expressway. For 
a fun-filled evening of 
dancing, it's the place to go! 







INTERIOR DESIGNERS— 

RMliaMlal •>' Caatract 
FINE ANTIQUES - MIHTINOS - FURNrfURE - CAINTS - AMEtMRIIt 

COFER CONTRACT DESNINS 

A fresfige Name in Interior Deugn 
for Over SO Yean 

161 1 Colley Ave NORFOLK. VA. 627-0291 

968 Laskin Rd VIRGINIA BEACH, VA. 428-7371 



Every Tuesday Night is SKI NIGHT At The SHACK 
- Featuring SKI FLICKS." Beginning at 9 p.m. «■> 



The Shack, an eaubllshment 
of 4 years, is known by the 
Locals as "THE PLACE IN 
VIRGINIA BEACH". An Early 
Poverty decor gives this 
favorite night spot a friendly 
and comfortable atomsphere. 
Managed by Jimmy Sellers, 
Cannon and Jack Bellls, 
The Shack features spe- 
cials 4 nights ^ week: Mon- 
day night. Begins the week 
with the Winter steak special - 
salad, French Fries, 6 oz. Steak 
and beverage - ALL FOR ONLY 
$2.50 Tuesday Night features 
Ski Flicks beginning at 9. 
Thursday Night is Ladies Night 
- Special 5 for 1. (Sorry, 
LADIES ONLY). Sunday 
Special - 5 for 1 from 3 to 6. 

The Shack, located at 218-17th 
St. is open from 6 to 1 AM. Mon. 
thru Sat; and 3 to 1 PM on Sun. 
It promises to be a night filled 
with excellent food, beverage, 
and fun ! 



THE STbWE AWAY: 
Features SKI NIGHT every 
Thursday Night, with Ski 
Films beginning at 9 P.M. The 
SPECIAL FOR SKI NIGHT IS 
5 for 1, Also featuring 
Luncheon Specials 7 days a 
wedt:. Come in and enjoy the 
good food, fun, and feiendly 
atmosphere. 

I 

BLUE PETE'S-Features 
BLUE GRASS every Saturday 
from 3 to 6 P.M. Another 
Saturday Special is ALL THE 
OYSTERS YOU CAN EAT for 
$4.00, (Steamed or on Half- 
Shell). The Special for Sunday 
is ALL THE FISH YOU CAN 
EAT for $3.00. 

To find Blue Pete's from Va. 
Beach-down Princess Anne 
Rd. to Pungo light; take a left 
on Indian River Rd. east to 
end, bear to left on Muddy 
Creek Rd. 

MR. ED'S PANCAKES- 
Centrally located between 
Atlantic Ave. and Rosemont 
Rd. is brand new on the 
Virginia Beach Scene. After 
an evening of entertainment to 
be sure to stop by Mr. F'd's, 
featuring HOME COOKED 
MEALS and DELICIOUS 
PANCAKES -24 HOURS A 
DAY!! 



\y0i. Sti^ Pancakes 

1752 Virginia Beach Hvd. 

OPEN 24 HOURS A DAY 







Vi^.tteacktiv^a 




425-5612 



p 

r 







ss^^^^p 



2?b ' /!h Street 

V'irdiiii.i Bf.icti. 



il5||gllJ|l!=5l|IL51fc5 



^^^^^v^^^^^^vi^^\^v»3aa^:^:^^]»>3>: 






^ 



.-s^ 



Hours— Mon.-FrL 
f A.M.-6 PJ»i. 
Thura.-9 A.M.-8 PJ*. 
Sat.-10 AJI.-2 PJL 




7. ^ 




% 



475 S. LYNNHAVEN ROAD 
MINIMALL ^MW 



BIUE BLUE GRASS 

W%^ f ENTERTAINMENT 

tTETES every 

Back Bay SATURDAY 

Marina Restaurant 3pai.to6pai. 

ALL YOU CAN EAT 

Thur». and Friday-Oy$t«rs ^$4.00 

Fried, StMm«d, or on the Half Shell 

Saturday-Statmed Shrimp JJ-25 

Sunday-FWi Special $30" 

1365 N. MUDDY CREEK RD. 426-2005 

OPEN: SUNDAY. THURSDAY 11 A,M. TO MIDNIGHT 
^IDAY AND SATURDAY 12 NOON TO 1 AJL 



X€^^^€^^^^^?SS^SSSSS^^\^%^%^^^^ 






Page A-10-The Sun-Wednesday, January 1€, 1974 



Picture the year 1973 ^H was a year af 





mum 



22 

5 5 
•7-6 

I 



sffiotr 

The big January snow kept most residents huddled 
indoors (top) and brought happy snowmen to the city 
(bottom). 









-A 



Wt^ 



* 



Mgiirises 



I'p. lip they went all over town. As developers 
discovered the high-rise condominium, the buildings 
began blossoming on the bayfront, oceanfront and 
other areas of town like wildf lowers nurtured by a 
spring rain. Some of them seemed to spring up 
overnight while others inched slowly toward the sky. 



- 


w 


-^..^ — fc_^ — ,.™fc„„ . — >„_™^.,™™,- - 


Wf jii^^^H 


and 


L^I^^H 


more 


If i^^^^^B^H 


returns 


W^^-^^^m 


Election returns, that is. 


^^^^I^^^BI 


Councilman Donald 


^^HbiMM^^^^^^^^ B 


Rhodes became ex- 


^^^^^^^^^^B^ . -^^ 


councilman Donald Rhodes 


^^^^^^^^Blk mm 


when Virginia Keach 


^^Mti^M^ 


I 


voters elected him to the 




1 


Virginia House of 


1 


Delegates in November. 


^^^"■"■MI^^Hi^ 


1 


Two House incumbents. 


^HHHHhhmb^^mi^ 


Glenn IVfcClanan and Owen 


^^^^^^^^^^^^H 


Pickett, were re-elected to 


^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^H 


serve second terms by 


^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^H 


Beach voters. 


^^1 






artists 

i\ nonchalant artist 
displayed his wares during 
the city's annual Board- 
walk Art Show held in the 
heat of June. The show 
netted almost $120,000, 
despite rainy weather ami. 
threats of a Sunday 
shutdown because of the 
Virginia Blue Law. Nearly 
500 artists from 25 states 
showed their paintings, 
sculpture %nd other works 
of art. 



tf 





and 

n^ore 

ideas 



llow lo keep sand on the beach? Why. you have 
helicopter! place sand fences under tl^ water, 
reasoned John Patter, who bet city council flOt.MO in 
March hLs inventions Would work. "Potter's Folly," as 
the project became known, was one of thme brflHant 
ideas that sounded good on paper, but when push aime 
to shove... 



■■ 



All photos by 
The Sun staff 



-TT- 



S ports 

Sofield named Sportsman of the Year 



-am Sun-Wadnwday. January 16. 1974-IHiBi B>t 



Tlie Virginia Beach Sports 
Club's most coveted award, the 
Outstanding Sportsman in 
Vir^ia Beach was presented 
to Wallace G. "Pop" SofleU at 
~vthe duh's 22nd annual Jamoree 
Blonday night at tiie Sheraton 
Beach Hotel. 
^ Also honored at the club's 
annual dinner were Kellam's 
Gene Bimn (outstuiding high 
school football award), 
Bayside's Joe Osborne (scholar 
athlete), Richmond's Barty 
Smith (outstanding college 
football player in Virginia), 
East Carolina's Carl Summerell 
^outstanding athlete from 
Tidewater), Kempsville 
baseball Coach Ray Barlow 
(C^oach of the Year) and Bill 
McDaniel (outstanding Virginia 
Beach SpOTts Cluh member). 

Sofield is just about the 
founding father of Little League 
baseball in Virginia Beach. He 
moved to Virginia Beach in 1960 
and immediately involved 
himself in the Little League 



[»vgram. When Sofield came to 
the Beach, the Little League ^ 
consisted of eight teams and one | 
field on 25th Street. After] 
holding just about every o^ce 
in the Little . League, 
oi^anization, Sofidd has seen 
the iMTogram glow to the p-eaent I 



27 teams and the building of the i 
eiicdlent baseball facilities at 
Hvpers Road. 

"IHIS AWARD wasjlong] 
overdw. Wh«i I received din' 
award, 'Pop' was the one who 
abovid have gottto it," said one ' 
past recipient. 



Sofield grateftiUy accepted 
the award saying," I'll be 82 
years old Uiis Thursday, and, 
I'm still the purchasing agent , 
t&t the Little League." For; 
anyone who &>ubts that Sofield | 

is stiU active in the! 
oifanixation, a look at his, 



garage will show he is far from*, 
retirement. "Hie equipment for 
the entire Little League is 
stored there. . 

Alabama football Coach niul' 
"Bear Bryant was the featured 
speaker at the festivities. After ^ 
coiSering liis favorite Frank 




BRYANT 



SMITH 



BRANICH 



BARLOW 



Howard story, Bryant gave 
some words of advice to his 
audience. He recoQim^dedl 
tiiat each po-son make a o^an 
for the ^OB Is he wishes to acidevei 
in life and then strive «4th 
everything he has to achieve 
that goal. "He concluded with 
the thought, "There are two 
kinds of people in life— winners 
and losers. I want to be; 
associated with winnws." 

The voice of the Pittsburgh 
Pirates, Bob Prince, stole the 
show from Bryant in his role as 
master of ceremonies. Prince 
amused the crowd with the 
stories he ha|,]jicked up in his 
years as a broadcaster. 

Dick Branich was installed as 
the new sports club pr^^ident, 
replacing Al Rothenburg. 
Branich is a basketball referee 
at both the college and high 
school levels. He was honored 
as the Sports Club's outstanding 
monber last year and served as' 
IMVgram director for this year's' 
Jamboree. 



I 3 State titles 

lin 73 is Beach 
claim to fame 



>i 



% 
^ 
s 



I 



s 






ByJOHNBANNON 
Sports Editor 

In 1973 there was shortages in just, about 
everything except winning Virginia Beach^ high 
school teams. Six Eastern District titles and three 
state championships were the major brass rings 
plucked by local teams in competition. 

The Kempsville baseball team carved then- own 
niche in Virginia high school athletics with a 
record-setting performance. The Chiefs became the 
first school ever to repeat as state baseball 
champions. 

Sensational sophomore pitcher Jimmy Moore 
led Kempsville's return march to the title. Moore 
hurled a four-hit 4-0 shutout over Woodson of 
Fairfax to propel the Chiefs into the finals. Two 
days later Moore returned to the mound to pitch 5 
and two-third innings of one-hit relief in Kemps- 
ville's 4-3 13-inning title-clinching win over 
Amherst County. Moore finished the season with a^ 
10-1 record. 

The Chiefs had breezed through the Eastern 
District season in 9-1 fashion to take their fifth 
straight district title. Coach Ray Barlow has logged 
a tM-22 record at Kempsville and the Virginia 
Bmm Spmts Cliib bestowed Barlow with high 
school coach of the year honors. 

PRINCESS ANNE'S golf team continued to roll 
mightily along. Under Coach Leo Anthony's 
direction, Uie Cavaliers stormed to their seconct 
straight state title. Their nearest challenger was 
J.R. Tucker High School a distant 20 strokes back. 

The Cavaliers recorded a perfect 23-0 match 
mark to extend their unbeaten string to 54 straight. 
Princess Anne's Richard Tucker took individual 
state honors in the state tournament with a 36-hole 

total of 145. 

Kempsville placed third in the state golf tourney, 
making the Beach the state's uncontested golfing 
power. The Chiefs narrowly missed upsetting 
Princess Anne in the Eastern Regionals, losing out 
by a mere one stroke. 

UNDER COACH Bill Gutermuth, Cox continued 
their surge toward becomiiig the state's premiere 
wrestling school. Stealing Granby's thunder, 
winners of 22 of 23 previous state titles, the Falcons 
successfully defended their state championship. 

Cox had an *ip and down road to their second 
title. The Falcons were awesome in the Eastern 
District tournament, qualifying 11 wrestlers for the 
regionals. Hampered by injuries, the Falcons 
>^altered in the regional tournament finishing 
Second to district rival Norview. Cox reboimded 
strong in the state tourney winning the team title by 
30 points. 



RAYSIDE QUARTERBACK Joe Osborne 
sweeps^ IVJaury's left end in high 
school football action last fall. The Marlins 




COX'S MIKE Battalio (right) hkpictiired here 
wrestling at last year's Falcon Invitational 
Wrestling Tournament. Battalio was one of 
four Cox state wrestling champions. TTw 
Falcons went undefeated in dual matches in 
1973 ai^ saccMsfully defended their state 
title. 



Five Beach grapplers took individual state 
titles. Princess Anne's Ken Nowlin took the 98- 
pound title, while Cox had a foui*man title con- 
tingent of Chris Conkwright (119-pound), Mike 
Battalio (126-pound), Mike Newbem (138-pound) 
and Jim Gaudreau (185-pound). With the exception 
of Battalio, all the wrestlers return this year 
to defend their titles. 

Girl athletes came to the forefront in the Beach 
this year. The first Eastern District girls field 
hockey tournament was held in November. On Dec. 
4, girls varsity basketball became a reality in the 
Beach. Cox's Sandy Conkwright won the state girls 
gymnastic ^le in the uneven parallel bars com- 
petition. 

Girls field hockey entered the big time with the 
first Eastern District tournament. Kellam emerged 
as the new power in the sport defeating Kennpsville 
2-1 for the cUstrict crown. Perennial power Cox had 
an off year. The Falcons lost two games which 
{equalled the number of defeats they had suffered in 
the previous seven years. District champ Kellam 
delivered both losses, one during the regular 
season, and one at the district tourney to knock the 
Falcons out of title contention. 

THE YEAR was not without its disap- 
pointments . Tennis, basketball and football failed to 
produce a ^gle district champion. Kempsville, 
city tennis dhampion with a 5-0 record, could do no 
better than second in the district standings despite 
a 9-1 record. Maury netted a perfect season to take 
top tennis honors. 

It was not a glory year for Beach hi^ school 
basketball. Princess AJnne, Cox and Bayside were 
the only local teams to make the Eastern District 
Tournament. All three clubs wa*e elimiitated by 
Norfolk opponents in the tourney's opening round. 

C^x and Princess Anne were Uie only two Beach 
clubs to post winning records. The Falcons barely 
cleared .500 with an 11-10 record. The Cavaliers 
posted an impressive 16-3 mark while winning their 
fifth consecutive" city championship with a 9-1 
record. Cox was the lone city team to upset Princess 
Anne gaming a 64-€2 triumph. 

THE CAVALIERS' Mike Ange was -the city's 
outstanding player. The 6'7" center topped the 
Beach scoring list with a 24.9 points per game 
average, and was named to both the All-City and 
All-District teams. 

Other members of the All-City team were 
Kemi^ville's Jim Roberts, Cox's Brooks WiUiams, 
and Elton Gross and Jim Goffigan both o^Bayside. 
Roberts finished a distant second to Ange in the 
scoring race with a 19.4 average. 

Princes Anne registered the season's longrat 
winning streak starting Uie season with nine cm- 
secutive success^. Prfljcess Anne's luck finally 
ran out when Bocker T. Washington destroyed the 
Cavaliers by 30 points. 

THE 1973 Beach high school football season 
started full of promise, but once again the sweet 
taste of victory turned to the bitterness of defeat by 
seasmi's end. 

At one time midway through the se^Mm, 
Bayside, Kellam and First CoIim^ held the Ui/p 
three spots in the Eastern District. All fell by the 
wa^ide in the face ai Lake Taylor's late season 
noh. 

Tbe aeamn mas not wiOoirt its h^ pi^ts 
thoi^. IteUam, rdxNBil^ fmn a seuon <9a^ 



scored the biggest win of the football season 
with a 27-2 rout snapping the Commodores 35- 
^ame winning streak. 

V 

loss, stnmg together nine consecutive victories to 
finish with the second highest point rating in the 
Eastern District. 

The Knights' biggest win of the season was a 2(M) 
win over Norview. It was the second of four 
shutouts recorded by the stingy Kellam defenders, 
but more importantly it was Kellam's first win ever 
over the Norfolk school. Coach John Cooke called 
the triumph "the greatest win in the history of 
Kellam football", and would later cite the game ai%. 
"the turning point in the boys believing in them- 
selves as football players." 

IT WAS A year of firsts for John Cooke and his 
Knights. Coach Cooke had his first winning season 
as a head coach. The Knights' nine-game whining 
streak and 9-1 mark were botti sdiool records. 
When the Knights shut out Kempsville 26-0 on Sept. 
28, Cooke had his first win over a Beach rival in 13 
tries. Kellam went on to tie Bayside and First 
Colonial for the city championship. 

Halfback Gene Bunn set a new Kellam single 
season rushing standard. The Knight defense 
allowed fewer points than any Kellam team in 
history. The offense set a new single game scoring 
record with a ^-point performance against Great 
Bridge. By the end of the seas(m, many area 
coaches contended that Kellam was the best team 
in the Eastern Region. 

Bayside had a season of success laced with some 
distinct disappointments. 

Ilie MarUns started. strong, but their title ex- 
press was derailed when Kellam scored a 24-21 
upset win. 

Two weeks fater "Bayside was back on top of the 
Eastern pistrict gaining the most important Beach 
win of the season. Playing almost flawless football, 
Uie Marlins routed Maury 27-2 to end the Com- 
modores' 35-game winning streak. Bayside didn't 
win the district^©, but Uieir win raided Maury's 
stranglehold on the district championship. 

THE NEXT week Bayside's UUe quest ended 
before the biggest crowd ever to witness a football 
game'at Bayside. The Marlins fell completely apart 
and lost to Lake Taylor 18-7. 

The Marluis 8-2 mark was Uie best in the school's 
history. Coach Bob Hicks called the team the best 
he had ever coached. It was also the last team he 
would ever lead. Hicks announced his retirement 
from coaching at the end of the season. 

MarUn linebacker Don Harold was named first 
team All-State. Halfback Roscoe Cdes wrote his 
own chapter in Uie Bayside record book. Tlie fleet 
senior rushed for over a 1,000 yards to lead the 
district and set a new Bayside record. Coles also set 
new standards for yards gained in a game (187 
against Maury), toudidowns in a game (fow 
against Booker T. Washmgton), and pcrtnts in a 
seasMi (92). 

FIRST COLONIAL bri^y challer^ for Uie 
district ftrntbaU crown heiore CMisecutive losses to 
Maury and Lake T^ykM- aided tiie Patriots' 
chaiM»i. 

Beadi harrio^ had an excelloit year tai 19^. 
First Cokmiai tock the district intkKM* track tiUe in 
March wHhile Bayside was Uie district croK Mxmtry 
UtUst. Beach teams almost made a clean sweq> d 
N(niolk schools in indow track taking the Gm five 
{daces in Uie cttstrln toumamoit. 

iUI in aU W^^lhM a i^ry gooA yma. 





SIDELINES 

By 

John 
Baimon 

Sports Editor 



Dolphins obtain 
Packer syndrome 

The Super Bowl was a super bore. 

The workmanlike efficiency with which the 
Dolphins (iisposed of the VUdngs made Super Bowl 
VIII about as dramaUc as watching clothes chy. 
Often the Dolphins have been compared wiUi the 
Vince Lombard! Packer teams of the 1960's. On 
Sunday the comparison never seemed more valid. 

Larry Csonica rMembled a bigger and quicker 
version of Jimmy Taylor. Mercury Morris ran with 
the verve of a Paul Homimg, only twic^ as fast. Jim 
Kiick comes off the bench in much the same 
manner Elijah Pitts did aU Uiose years in Green 
Bay. 



AT THE QUARTERBACK posiUon is where Uie 
resemblance is the strongest. Bob Griese calls the 
game in the same conservaUve manner made so 
succc^ful by Bart Starr for the Packers. Running 
the other team to death and Uie clock to a quick 
finish, throwing only whoi you least expect it and 
then for big yardage — this is the game plan Starr 
made famous and Griese now emulates so well. 

The defense may not be as punishing as their 
Packer predecauors, but they are equally 
proficient. 

Yet, Uiere is no love in this heart for Miami. I 
have spent a»llfeUme rooting against the so-called 
dynasUes in pro sports — the Yankees, Uie CelUcs 
and the Packers. Itiere was a certain arrogance 
about those teams that struck a discordant note hi 
my brain. 

The Dolphhis are made of Uie same mold. Iliey 
write off ttieir lack of a rah-rah sphit by saying 
they're Just professionals with a Job to do. To me, it 
smacks of arrogance both on the field and off. 



DURING THE GAME. Griese sends Csoidca up . — 
the middle and dares the other team to stop Mm. 
Csoidta, Just like Taylor, disdains feints once he is „, 
in the other team's defensive secmidary. He would 
rather run through somebody than around. After 
the Oakland play-off game, Uie Dolphin fullback 
told an interviewer on national television that he 
didn't "have time for Uiis" (Uie hiterview). The 
Dolphins are too busy behig machine-like to stop 
and be human. 

That is the difference between a likeable team 
and one that is merely efficient. Ilie Cowboy- 
Packer match-ups of Uie '60'i were classic 
examples of man versus machhie. The Cowboys 
under Don MerldeUi were widely unpredictable 
while the staid Packers were as predictaUe as the 
sun rising in the momhig. 

Efficiency won out both Umes, once on a l|i8t 
minute end zone interception, and once on a last 
second quarterback sneak. Yet, ttiere was a certain 
loyalty felt for Dallas. Brash youth had twice come 
within an eyelash of upsetUng Uie establishment. 

Lombard! robbed Uie dynasty-iiatra's of Uie world 
their day hi the sun. He retired while he was sUU on 
top, and the Packers fell apart without him. Don , 
Shtila and his cohorts have no intention of calling it 
quits at this earl^ stage. 

Someday theh- applecart is going to be upset, 
because in the world of sports all good (bad) things 
come to an end. 

For now, I'll stUl take a team with a blackboard- 
breajjing defensive end over the cold efficieiKy of 
the Dolphins. 

Local teams gain six wins 



in wrestling action 



Virginia Beach high school 
wresUers liad a M record 
agataist outside ccmipetition last 
week. 

In action Saturday, Cox 
defeated Lake Taylor 37-17, 
il Kempsville blasted Granby 51- 
i/ 6, First Colonial edged Booker 
I T. Washington 35-29, and 
^,rfrince8S Anne romped over 
f, Bayside 45-5. 

& Cox improved their season 
p rMord to 7-0, and extended their 
4 unbeaten dual meet str^g to 35 
% straight witli the win over Lake 
4 Taylor. The Falcons trio of state 
I champions,, Giris Conkwright, 
I Mike Newborn, and Jim 
s Gaudreau remained unbeaten 
^ on the year with convincing 
victories. The three wrestlers 
have a combined dM record 
this year. 






KEMPSVILLE COACH Keith 
Lowrance returned to his for- 
mer school for an easy victory. 
Granby forfeited five matches 
to insure the C^iiefs of the win. 
Kempsville is now 3-1-2 on the 
year. 

First Colonial came out on top 
in Uie night's clweat match 
dupite dropping the flnal two 
bouts. The Patriots had rolled to 
an early lead b^ind Freeman 
Gregg (138-pound) and Jeiry 
Pontes (155-pound), who 
registered pins at :44 and 2:00 
respectively. Gregg remains 
undefeated on the y^r. 

PrincMs Anne won all but one 
matdi in gainiM their biK win 
over Bayside. Brian Johiwxi, 
with a 6-3 l$5-pound decision. 
registWed the Marlim imly 
points of the matdi. 

The Cavalim-'s SSi^MsMl state 
champ K«i Nowlin reb(Mn<M 
strong from a (ta-aw earti^ in 
Uie wtek fma^ hn opfoaml. 
Jim Bai^raiM. Prio^ Amif 's 
hi^y r^arcM ISS-prante-, 
pilned a S-Sded^CNi to atmie ftM- 



an earlier loss. 

IN ACTION Friday night, 
KemiMville dropped Bayside 40- 
9 and Kellam defeated Granby ' 
42-24. 

f Kempsville won the first 
seven bouts to move to a 
comfortable early lead. Bayside 
failed to close the gap despite 
winning three of the last five 
bouts. Mark Himarski con- 
tinued to give the Chiefs a lift in 
the heavyweight class 
registering a pin at 3:54. 

Kellam hardly worked up a 
sweat in their match with 
Granby. The Comets forfeited 
half the bouts to start off % 
points behind. The Kni^ts won 
only one bout on the mat. 
Melvin Fisher (105-pound) was 
the lone Kellam wmtler to 
defeat a Granby opponent. 

IN ACTION Jan. 9, Cox 
trounced Princess Anne 42-7, 
Kellam defeated Oscar Smith 
35-24 and First Colonial beat 
Maury 56-12. 

The Falcons put forth their 
best effort of the year in their 
match with Princess Anne. Cox 
freshmen Bob Battalio 
registered the match's biggest 
surprise holding Princess 
Anne's 9S-pound champ Nowlin 
to a draw. It was the, first time 
this year that Nowlin had failed 
to come up with a victory. 

It was a tough night for un- 
beaten Cavalier wrestlers. 
BanJumea had his imblemiriied^ 
record tarnished by a 9-2 loss to 
lUisty Yo-kes. 

Kellam took the* last five 
bouts of the match to ove-come^ 
m wrly (^ar SmiUi l«id.* 
Gtm Buna and Gcm^ Irby 
continued to imprest both 
gaining easy wins. The Kni^ts 
Charles Skipper remained 
undefeated. 

li» Patriots sewed swen 
ptm in defeating Matffy. 



t-^ ^j^m ^. 



MmMmtm 'f^ 



Page B-2— The Sun— Wednesday, January 16, 1974 



Moore's shot closes lid 
on Cavalier upset bid 



Granby 57 
PrtaceaiAnneSS 

Princess Anne's four game 
winning streak came to a halt 
Jan. 8, but Ck»ach Leo Anthony 
still doesn't believe it. 

"We jrtayed great all ni^t, 
held them to 17 points in the 
second half, and (Ronnie) 
Moore throws one in from out of 
bounds to beat us," groaned 
Anthony. 

Moore's shot with two seconds 
left in the game ruined a 
brilliant Cavalier comebacli. 
Princess Anne had battled back 
from a nine-point halftime 
deficit to knot the score at 55-55. 
Playing deliberately, the 
Cavaliers closed the gap with a 
tight zone defense and hot 
shooting by forwards John 
Paden and George Purdin. The 
pair combined for 34 points to 
lead Princess Anne's near 
upset. 

A disputed first half call 
disturbed Anthony as much as 
Moore's last second basket. 
Reserve Rich Banta hit a 
basket, which the referee 
disallowed saying a Granby 
player had fouled the Cavalier. 
Inexplicably, the referee 
awarded Banta two free throws. 
"He claimed Paden tapped it in 
but John was standing at the top 
of (he key," according to 
Anthony. 



In a close contest the negatM 
basket was of great importance. 

"TTie game still convinced me 
that we can play the Norfolk 
schools on an equal basis," said 
Anthony. 

First Colonlal$l 
KempsvUleSO 

First Colonial's Bert Lewis 
broke out of a season long 
scoring slump with a 20-point 
effort to lead the Patriots to a 
54-50 win over Kempsville. 

It was the second time this 
year First Colonial had eked out > 
a close win over the Chiefs. 
Following the same pattern the 
second time around, the 
Patriots caught Kempsville 
down the stretch. 

Erasing a three-point Kemps- 
ville margin behind the hot 
shooting of Lewis, First 
Colonial opened their Eastern 
District season with a win. 

For the third straight game 
forward Oliver Mayfield led the 
Chief scoring parade with 19 
points. Kempsville has gotten 
off on the wrong foot to begin 
the district season dropping 
their first two league contests. 

Booker T. Washington 7? 
Bayside43 

Bayside Coach Conrad 
Parker kjipws he needs 40 points 




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betweoti Elton Gn»s and Jim 
Goffigan to win. 

Against Booker T. 
Washington, the pair managed 
only 21 points, and the Marliiu 
lost by 29. Bayside fell apart in 
the second quarter managing 
only six points. The quicker 
Bookers took advantage of the 
poor Bayside effort to build an 
11-point half time lead. 

"It was just one of those 
nights where we couldn't do 
anything fight," lamented 
Pariter. 

Maury 97 
Cox 76 

Maury stars Karlton Hilton 
and Vic Jones combined for 48 
points, if} make matters worse 
for the "Falcons, Corhmodore 
guard Henry Collins had his 
best shooting night of the season 
hitting 14 of 16 from the floor for 
a game-high 28 point$. Cox fell 
before the three-pronged attack 
97-76. 

The Falcons made a game of 
it in the first half, and only 
trailed by three points at in- 
termission. Forward John 
Richards was high-man for Cox 
with 20 points. «. 

Oscar Smith 81 
Kallamei 

Oscar Smith broke the game 
open with a 21-8 first quarter 
burst and defeated Kellam for 
the second time this season. For 
the Tigers, it was their seventh 
straight win. 

The Knights usually potent 
attack had one of their worst 
nights of the season. Forward 
Gary Woodhouse was the 
game's high scorer with 15 
points. 



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KELLAM AND Bayside players 
battle for rebound in action Friday 
night. Bayside dropped Kellam 90-82 
at Kellam. Marlin center Elton 



Gross set new school rebouikling 
record with 28. (Sun photo by Rod 
Boudoin) 



Kellam loses 90>82 

Marlins end loss streak 



Bayside 90 Kellam 82 

Bayside's Elton Gross has 
this thing about Kdlam. It 
seems he likes to set school 
records against them. 

Earlier in the season, Gross 
seta n^w Bayside single-game 
scoring record against the 
Knights with a 3S-point 
performance. This time Gross 
was one point shy of tying his 
own record, but hedi^ break the 
Marlin single game rebounding 








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Sedan Fully Loaded 2595. 1995. 

1971 Ford Station 

Wagon Fully Loaded 

Extra Nice 2495. 1795. 

1973 Javelin Has ' 
9,000 Miles New, 

Car Warranty 

Fully Loaded Pre- i 

tty Red 3895. 2995. 

1971 Plymouth 

Cricket A ReaT 

Gas Saver 1995. I'»95. 

1972 Winnebago Motor Home 
tost New S27<0OO.0O Has 7.000 
Miles Our Price SI 3.500.00 



BAYSIDE MOTORS 

-1/4 7 Shoit' [j»- Home ol Fine Aulomo6ile; vn.i.ni.i Bi^jo 
. 464-4563 Oiod o«,i'c. va. Li-eme Mo. J363 460-I05U 



mark pulfmg down 28 errant 
shots. 

Despite Gross' heroics, 
underdog Kellam stayed close 
until the final quarter, but 
.Bayside converted 14 of 19 free 
throw attempts to ice the 
contest. The win snapped a two- 
game Marlin loss streak and 
boosted their record to 6-4. For 
the Knights, it was their sixth 
straight loss bringing| their 
season's log to 1-8. 

Kellam, down by three at the 
half, rallied to even things by 
the end of the third quarter. 
Senior Jim Perkins, who had a 
season-high 20 points, led the 
Knight charge. Fouls would 
spell the end to the Knights 
upset hopes. 

The rdferee's whistle singled 
out Kellam's Richard Folsom 
and Gary Woodhouse, two of the 
Knights better defensive 
ballplayers for their fifth fouls. 
The oiitmanned Knights were 
outscored 27-16 down the 
stretch. 

Bayside forward Jim 
Goffigan complimented Gross' 
effort with 24 points. Marlin 
Coach Conrad Parker continues 
to get improved scoring out of 
guard Ricky Fletcher. The 
senior guard hit for 14 points. 

Kellam following a seastm 
long patteirn had a balanced 
scoring effort placing five men 
in double figures. Woodhouse, 
Folsom, Brian Macon, and 
Sonny Blackman were the 
double figure scorers for the 
Knights along with Perkins. 

Defense, or rather the lack (rf 
it, once again told the story of 
another Kellam failure. 

Kellam travelled to Norview 
Tuesday night while Bayside 
was idle. 

I.ake Taylor 65 
Princess Anne 4.5 

Slowdown tactics, which had 



worked so well earlier in the 
week against Granby, backfired 
(Ml Princess Anne. 

The deliberate Cavaliers 
were beaten 65-45 by 
rebounding Lake Taylor Friday 
night. The Titans, in winning 
their third straight, outscored 
the Cavaliers in every quarter. 
Princess Anne has now dropped 
two straight as their season 
slate fell to 6-3. Lake Taylor is 
now 6-2. 

The Titans got unexpected 
scoring punch from guard Paul 
Trowell, who shredded the 
Cavalier zone defenses for 18 
points. Lake Taylor got their 
normal performances out of big 
men Tommy Graves and 
George Lewis. The pair 
combined for 35 points against 
their smaller opposition. 

Princess Anne got off to a 
slow start with only six first 
quarter points, and found 
themselves down by six at the 
end of pie quarter. The situation 
did not improve in the second 
quarter. The Cavaliers again 
failed to break double figures in 
the stanza, and trailed by nine 
at the half. 

The six-point first quarter and 
15-point half were bott) seasonal 
lows for the Cavaliers. High- 
scoring Princess Anne forward 
John Paden had a particularly 
tough shooting night. Entering 
the game averaging 19 points a 
game, the6'4" senior was held 
tn a mere four points. 

Tuesday night Prinpess Anne 
was on the road against Booker 
T. Washington. 



Little League 
registration 



VIRGINIA . 
BEACH 
ENGRAVING & 
TROPHY CO. 

Trophies. Plaques. Awards 

Machine Engravii^; 

Craig A. Montgomery, 

President 

. 4968 HolluidRd. Suite C 

499-4641. 





THE EQUITABLE LIFE ASSURANCE 
SOCIETY OF THE UNITED STATES 

Salutes 

THE CITY OF VIRGINIA BEACH 
ON ITS ELEVENTH ANNIVERSARY 



William R. Burnette, CLU 
George E. Beamon 
Beverly Burton 
Harold F. Gernert 
David R. Kern 
Aiihur F. King, Jr. 
James R. Peake, Jr. 



R. Bradshaw Pulley 
Richard T. Short 
Joel L. Smith 
Jack O. Stevens 
Louis Whitchurch 
ValP. Watts 



Robert B. Bergner, District Manager 



One Commercial Place, 
Norfolk, Virginia. 23510 
627-2607 



2606 Pacific Ave. 

Virginia Beach, Virginia. 23451 
428-5642 



The Equitable Life Assurance 
Society of the United States 

1285 Avenue of the Americas 
New York, New York 10019 



this month 



Registratrion times for the 
Plaza baseball Little League 
have been announced. Re- 
gistration will be held at the, 
Plaza Fire Station and every 
boy must be accompanied by an 
adult. Those registering for the 
first time should bring their 
birth certificate. " 

Eight and nine year olds can 
register on Jan. 26 from 10:00 A. 
M.till4:00P. M. orfroml:OOP. 
M. until 4:00 P.M. on Jan. 27. 
Boys ages 13-15 can register on 
Feb. 2 from 10:00 P. M. till 4:00 
P. M. or Feb. 3 from 1:00 P. M. 
till 4:00 P. M. 'Registration for 
boys 10 through 12 will be held 
on Feb. 9 10:00 A. M. tUl 4:00 P. 
M. and again on Feb. 10 from 
1:00 P. M. till 4:00 P. M. 



Preview 



Beach basketball 

having trouble 

in Eastern 

ByJOHNBANNON 
^rtsEditm- 

Virginia Beach high school basketball teams did 
little to change their weak sister image in the 
Eastern District. Local clubs dripped five games 
against outside competition without a win. Beach 
teams are 3-U against outnde competition and a > 
miserable 0-7 against the Norfolk members of the 
Eastern District this season. 

This week First Colonial gets their first lode at 
the brand of ball played in Norfolk. 
FRIDAY'S GAMES 
Lake Taylor at First Colonial 

First Colonial has been the surprise team al ttie 
season. The Patriots have rolled to a 6-1 record with 
guard Sp^y Gainer spearheading the attack. 
Gainer rates as the best guard in the Beach. 

Patriot Coach Alton Hill maintains, "The party is 
over now we have to play Granby, Lake Taylor and 
Booker T. Washington all in a row." The only good 
thing about if is we get two «f them at home." 

If toe Patriots are to compete against the Norfolk 
powers, forward Bert Lewis is going to have to 
break out of his season-long shooting slump. First 
Colonial needs the talented senior to play up to his 
potential against Lake Taylor. The Titans front- 
court averages 6'5" and is keyed by star forward 
Tommy Graves. 

The teams have had two common opponents in 
Bayside and Princess Anne. Lake Taylor d^eated 
both teams while the Patriots managed only a split. 

Lake Taylor has been inconsistent this season. 
First Colonial has a good ^t at becoming the first 
local team to defeat a Norfolk school. 
Kellam at Princess Anne 

These two teams met earlier in the season and 
Princess Anne came away with a hard-earned 63-54 
win. 

The Cavaliers have come the closest to upsetting 
a Norfolk team of any Beach squad. Granby nipped 
Princess Anne 57-55 last week on a last second 
jumper. 

JPnncess Anne has become a deliberate baU club 
working for good shots and playing tight defense. 
The Cavaliers have the best defensive average of 
any Beach team. Six opponents have been held to 
under 00 points by close-guarding Princess Anne. 
The Cavaliers are 6-3 on the year. 

Kellam is mired in a six game losing streak, 
which has dropped their season slate to 1-8. Defense 
has been almost non-existent at Kellam. The 
Knights have given up 262 pmnts over their last 
three ballgames. Kellam continues to score 
frequently, but not at the rapid clip their defense is 
allowing points. 

Friday night the pattern should stoy about the 

same. 

Norview at Bayside 

Bayside has been a mild disappointment this 
season. The Marlins have a 64 record, and Princess 
Anne is the only team with a winning record that 
Bayside has defeated. 

The Marlins have been led by Elton Gross and 
Jim Goffigan who are averaging 47 points a game 
between them. How these two fare determines 
Bayside's fate. Coach Conrad Parker needs big 
performances out of both big men to win in a tight 
contest. 

Guard Ricky Fletcher has picked up the scoring 
slack in the Marlin backcourt hitting for double 
figures in each game since he was inserted into the 
starting line-up six games ago. 

If Gross and Goffigan are on, Bayside is Capable 
of beating anyone. 

Kempsville at Granby 

Kempsville started the season fast, but they seem 
to be^ fading just as quickly. The Chiefs have 
dropped two strai^t and now face district power 
Granby. The Comets are coming off their biggest 
win of the season defeating Maury Saturday night. 

Kempsville has been getting excellent scoring 
production out of forward Oliver Mayfield. Star 
center Britt Glisson is another story. The 6'5" 
senior has managed only 11 points in the Chief* last 
two encounters. The Chiefs will need a super Effort 
out of Ghsson, if they are to improve their 5-4 
record. 

COX IS idle Friday night. 

On Saturday night Princess Anne hosts Great 
Bridge. 

Granby is at Cox, First Colonial travels to Booker 

T. Washington, Kellam hosts Maury, Lake Taylor is 
at Kempsville and Bayside hosts Princess Anne 
Tuesday night. '- 




City of Virginia Beach 

NOTICE 

Change in Garbage Collection 
Schedule in 

North Virginia Beach 

Beginning on Tuesday, January 22, r974 the 

following area will be collected on TUESDAYS: The Ocean 
side of Atlantic Avenue from 42nd street to Fort Story and 
the West side of Atlantic Avenue to Holly Road beginning 
at 32nd street to Fory Story. Also the area of Princess 
Anne Hills. If you have any questions please contact Refuse 
Collection Division at 427-4201 or the city "HOTLINE" at 
427-4111 between the hours of 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. 



r^mm^m^^mmi 



mgfSfesrm^Km^mswmemm 




The Sun-W8dn«sday, January 16, 1974-Pa9e B-3 



Patriots drop Cox for second time; 
Gainer and Spellman star in win 



WRESTLING ACTION last week saw the 
Beach gain six victories witliout a defeat. Cox 
is continuing to dominate tlie Eastern District 



winning two more matclies last week. (Sun 
photo by Rod Budoin) 



Light wrestling schedule in store 
for Beach grapplers this week 



ByJOHNBANNON 
Sports Editor 

Beach wrestling teams are 
coining off a very successful 
week. Bayside and Princess 
Anne were the only local clubs 
to suffer defeats in last week's 
heavy mat schedule. 

This week the load is much 
lighter vyith only six matches 
scheduled. 

TONIGHT 

Norfolk Catholic 
at First Colonial 

First Colonial had one of their 
best weeks of the season gaining 
two victories last week. The 
Patriots now have a 4-3 match 
record. 

Freeman Gregg has been the 
star of the First Colonial team 
this season. Gregg owns a 10-0 
record in 138-pound contests, 
and is the F*atriots' only un- 
defeated wrestler. Jerry Pontes 
has lost only one 155-pound' 
match this season to give First 
Colonial a potent one-two punch 
in the middle weights. 

Norfolk Catholic is a step out 
of their league in taking on the 
Patriots. First Colonial should 
extend their winning streak to 
three. 

FRIDAY 

.'^ KempsvilleatKeiiam 

Two of the hottest teams in 
the Eastern District meet head 
to head, both teams registered 
two victories in action last 
week. Kempsville is now 4-1-2 
wliile Kellam holds a 4-2 dual 
match record. The Knights 
have takein three straight- 
matches since returning to 
action after the vacation break. 

Gene Bunn and George Irby 
h^ve been key factors in the 
Knights' resurgence. The 
wrestlers have combined for a 
S-O record since returning to 
action early this month. 



Kempsville developed the 
early season habit of building 
an early lead and then watch it 
dwindle as the Chiefs lost bouts 
in the upper weights. 
Heavyweight Mark Ritiftr^ki 
has changed the pattern. After 
recovering from an injqJry, 
Rimarski has been undefeated. 

The match promises to be the 
closest match-UD of the week. 

SATURDAY'S MATCHES 

f 

Bayside at Lake Taylqr 

Bayside's losing streak 
climbed to three, and their 
seasonal record dropped to 2-5 
with two losses last week. 

The Marlins only bright spot 
was 185-pounder Brian Johnson 
who won both of his matches. 
Dave Cash, who had been 
Bayside's most consistent 
wrestler, could manage only a 
split last week and has now 
dropped two of his last three 
bouts. 

Lake Taylor i$ coming off a 
loss to Cox, but the Titans were 
impressive in defeat. The 17- 
point total Lake Taylor 
managed against the Falcons 
was the second highest allowed 
by the defending state cham- 
pions all season. 

The Marlins are going to have 
to make a complete turnabout 
to break out of their mid-season 
slump^i 

Maury at Cox 

Cox just keeps rolling along. 
The two-time defending state 
champion Falcons improved 
their dual match .record to 7-0 
winning twice last week. 

Maury is anchored near the 
bottom of the Eastern District 
standings. The Commodores 
have been plagued by a lack of 
wrestlers causing forfeits each 
^ime out; 

The two teams have had one 
common opponent. Maury lost 
to Princess Anne by a big 
margin while the Falcons 



defeated the Cavaliers 42-7. 

Cox has won 35 consecutive 
dual matches and are too solid a 
team to have trouble with 
Maury. 

Princess Anne at Granby 

Princess Anne was expected 
to challenge for the Eastern 
District title, but the Cavaliers 
have gotten off to a 3-3 stum- 



bling start. 

Former wrestling 
powerhouse Granby has yet to 
win a dual match this season 
despite having two undefeated 
wrestlers. The Comets forfeit 
half their bouts in each match. 
Princess Anne should have no 
trouble in gaining victory 
number four. 

Kellam hosts Western Branch 
on Saturday night. 



This Week 's Boxes 



PRINCESS ANNE 



Padin 

Callan 

Oalty 

Bant) 

Orubar 

Pat. 

Tucker 



GRANBY 

G 

Willlami 2 

Rtld b 

Woodbury 2 

Htnntgan 3 

Moora 10 

Humphrty 2 

Fowte 1 

C«rtar 



Robinwn tO 

Rtchardi 3 

Atltn 3 

Raich S 

Hit! 

Addison 

Kazansky 1 



23 
8 
9 



25 16-31 66 



2i 13-18 55, 2* 

P.Anrff 15 16 13 11-55 

Granby 23 17 8 9-57 



FIRST COLONIAL 81 



Spallman 8 

Butts 5 

Gainn 9 

Harrlss 4 

Lawts 5 

OoyM 1 
McCUnnan 1 

Turrwr 3 

iJat9 1 



0« 
0-1 



1 



PRINCESS ANNE 45 



Purdin 

PMlan * 

Callan 

Zinno 

Dally 

Bant* 

Pata 

Manual 

Tucktf 

Hollowtll 

Ellis 



LAKE TAVLOR 65 



Tfowtll 9 

Gmas 8 

Ltwis 6 

, Harpar 2 

Bardan 4 

Jc^nson 

Rice 

^ittds 



COK _ 16 13 19 17-65 

Ft. CQlonial..l6 24 20 21-^1 



19 7-10 45 



P. Anna 9 6 16 14-45 

LakeTay)or..t2 12 1922-65 



FIRST COLONIAL 54 



-Apflltman 
Lawis 
Bowman 
Butts 
Doyla 
Gainac 
Hairli 
Tutnar 
Wood Ml 



6-8 



2-3 
2-4 



KEMPSVILLl 50 



Mayfitd 

Mbalon 

Glisson 

Foslai 

Gilchttst 

GitlUm 

Ashby 

Earp 



Hilton 

Jonas 

(:ollint 

Coopar 

aidu'nt 

Madd«\_, 

Kissall 

Grlflin 

J, Gray 

McCrOy 

K. Grey 

NorrtsJ 



Robffiion 

Richards 

Raich 

Allan 

Htll 

Addison 

Bourdon 

Hallett 



Cox 18 24 16 18-76 

itaury 20 25 24 28-97 



22 10-16 54 



Ft.Calonial..l0 13 13 18-54 
Kwnpsvllla.... 7 16 15 12-50 



OSCAR •iMITH 81 



Woodhouse6 . 

Foliom 5 

^teckmon 6 

Macon 7 

Mills 2 

Hufhas 1 

Pvkirn 9 

36 



3-8 
2-2 

1-3 



2-3 
10-20 



• KEYS • SAFES * LOCKS • 
Commercial-lndustrial-Residential 



428-5599 

Nights Call 
340-7419 

VIRGINIA BEACH 
KEY & LOCK eft 

618 Hilltop West 
Shopping Center 



Keys Made For 
Any Lock 
Combinations Chan 



Galll««n 

Flatchat 

Osborne 

Gross 

Harold 

Colas 

DuhB 

foiky 



Bayside 23 24 18 26-90 

'■ Kanim .23 2321 17-82 



Woodnouse6 
Redus 

Macon 4 

""'* , ft- 
eiackrrttm 2™ 



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Faliom 




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15 Spellman 5 

2 Ctark 6 

to Edmondi 3 

8 Floyd ^ 

5 Fonvttia 6 

3 I.l I 7 Hil! 4 

2 0-0 4 Scott ! 

3 4-8 10 SharUm 6 

Culpapper 1 

24 13-32 61 catMham 



KflUm..„,„, 8 19 19 15-61 
Oscar Smith.,2J 2i.l6i3-8l 



WANTED 

Houses To Sell 

Anywhere in Va. Beach 



For quick results and more cash In your pocket . . . 
let us sell your property. A competent staff of Profes- 
sional experts on duty and always available. 

CALL 497-4851 ^' 

STOHL REALTY 

4920 Virginia Beach Blvd. at Aragona Blvd. 




Acoustic Guitars 



>»•«» 



SAVE UP TO 



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BEGINNER ELECTRIC GUITAR 

includes instruction Booit. Guitar Bag, 3 Picks and Cord 

Retail: '129'^ SALE: •59»5 

BASS GUITAR - Retail n49'V sale: •64" 

AMPLIFIERS "Low PS »49" 
^ ACOUSTIC GUITAR SALE still In Progress 

Save Up To 50% 

(ovBf one • hundred fo choose from) 

Mason Music 

853 E. LITTLE CREEK RD. 
-NORFOLK- 5834513 



Layaways 

All Charge 

Card$ Ateepfed 




HyJOHNBANNON 
Sports Editor 

One hot shooting guard can 
usually turn a game around. 
Double the dosage spells an 
easy victory. Friday night at 
First Cdonial, the Patriots 
dumped city rival Cox 81-46 
behind'the accurate shooting of 
guards Speedy Gainer and 
Clevland Spellman. 

Gainer was the Patriot hot 
hand in the first half hitting all 
six of his field goal attempts. 
When Gainer's touch cooled in 
the final half, Spellman came 
off the bench to hit seven of 
eight shots to put the game out 
of reach. 

Despite Gainer's long range 
barr^, the Falcons managed 
to stay close in the opening 
quarter thanks to a hot shooter 
of their own. Sophomore center 
Chris Reich hit 4 of 5 from the 
floor to keep Cox in contention. 
Falcon forward Randy 
Robinson hit a bucket at the 
close of the first stanza to pull 
Cox abreast of the Patriots at 
16-16. It was the first time the 
score had been even since the 
opening moments.' 

COX, OFF to a 1-10 start, has 
had a recent history of third 
quarter collapses. Friday night 
the Falcon downfall came a 
quarter early. Gainer and 
reserve Mike Butts alternated 
hitting baskets for the Patriots, 
and Cox was down 25-18. First 
Colonial's surge continued 
throughoutthestanzaand thegap 

swelled to as much as 13 points. 
First Colonial owned a 40-29 
lead at intermission. 

The third quarter underlined 
the sloppiness of the play 
throughout the contest. Neither 
teaiti made any serious move 
over the eight-minute span. The 
quarter ended with the Patriots 
on top 60-48. The game had 
more turnovers than a pastry 
shop. The Falcons displayed a 
distinct inability to hold on to 
the ball committing 23 
turnovers. 

Cox did manage one brief 
challenge at the start of the 



final quarter. The Falcons 
outscored their opponent 5-0 to 
pull within seven points. 
Spellman entered the game at 
this juncture, and after missing 
his first attempt i^oceeded to 
hit his next five shots. 

Spellman's burst put the 
game oiit of reach. Surprising 
First Colonial now has a 6-1 
record. First year Coach Alton 
ilill continues to get great 
mileage out of his bench. The 
Patriot reserves combined for 
34 points in what was one of the 
determining factors in the 
c6ntest. The Cox bench 
contributed only 11 points. 

Robinson continued his 
steady effort for the Falcons 
netting a game-high 23 points. 
The only aspect that marred the 
senior's fine all-around 
perfwmance was his 3 for 9 free 
throw effort. Cox had a horrible 
night at the lirSl^ hitting 16 of 31 
free throws overall 

FALCON CENTER Reich, 
after a 15-point first half, faded 
badly in the second half. The 
promising sophomore was held 
to a scant four points in the third 
quarter and drew a blank in the 
final eight minutes to finish the 
evening with 19 points. 

Gainer led the Patriot scoring 
parade with 19 points. Spellman 
made the most of his part-time 
duty notching 17 points. Butts 
was another reserve double- 
figure scorer. Doing 'most of his 
damage in the second quarter, 
Butt^ added 10 points to the 
winniW cause. Aboull the only 
dull spm for Coach Hill, was the 
play of star forward Bert Lewis'. 
The senior remained mfred in 
his season long slump hitting 
only 4 (rf 17 from the floor. 

Hill would rather talk about 
his guards. "I haven't seen a 
better guard in the city than 
Gainer, and Spellman really 
gives us a lift coming off the 
bench." 

On Friday night he would get 
no argument from Cox Coach 
Phil Williams. 

Tuesday night First Colonial 
hosted Granby while Cox 
travelled to Kempsville. 




FIRST COLONIAL and Cox playen await 
rebound in action Friday night. Patriots lieat 
Cox Kl-66. (Sun photo by Franli DuBols) 








nth% 



"^"NlMlVf'^l 




CONGRATULATIONS 

VIRGINIA BEACH ON 

YOUR nth 

ANNIVERSARY 




15)33 VIRGINIA BEACH aOUOW** 
VIRGINIA BEACH, VIROINIA 

DIAL: 497-3531 




upto^off 

SUITS and SPORT COATS from our regular stoclc. Current 
styles & pattentr DOUBLE-KNIT. First Quality American 
made . . . Sizes 36 to SO. Regulars, Lonp, alio a few Shorti 
and Extra Lon^. 



FlliS! IN JiUtiVATEH 

iFactory Otitlety 

Save Up To SOS On 
Man '$ Ouslity Clolhiny 



liiiii>Hiii:iio 



1200 1. UttlcCrttN Rd. 
Oppotit* Military Hwy. 



Canyou a£Ebid 



to earn 



7M% 





We're obviously not 
trying to talk you out of our own 
7!4% savings certificate. 

We'd just like you to understand 
what getting that kind of interest involves. 
Because for one thing, it involves a 
minimum of a thousand dollars. 
And for another, it involves leaving the thousand 

dollars with us for at least 4 years. 

So before you make any decisions about how to save money, or commit 

yourself to any specific kind of account, come in and see us. 

If you're saving for things like your retirement, your second grader's 

college education, or just because you liave a lot of money, you're absolutely right 
to consider a time deposit account. /; 

If you're saving for your spring wardrobe, on the other hand, you could 
lose money that way. And we'd like to talk to you about 
alternatives tiiat woiild make more sense. 

We won't deny we're as interested in opening new 
savings accounts as any bank in Virginia. 

But we would like to make sure you gain as much 

firom an account with us, as we do. 

You see,"Don't face it alone"isn'tjust a button we wear. 

It's a responsibility, UK). ' 

lMted^^rgiIliaQ9 

Federal Uw and regulations pu^hAu the withdrawal of a tinw dcpofU pnoi I" matunry i»ifc» thtmttttu m the aimmni witbdiawn Bicdyccd (Q the 

rrgular avinp rate and 3 monthi' ifi»rc«» II turtetfd 

United VirMinia Bank Siah<iiiril Naimnal Member F.D.I. C. 




amm 



tmim 



_,^^pM|Hpppq«p 



Aig* B-4— The Sun— Wednesday, January 16, 1974 



ANOTHER YEAR OF SERVICE TO YOU 



Established... 



18^ 



ELIZABETH RIVER BAPTIST CHURCH-SBC 
601 Sparrow Road- 420-847a 

SUNDAY SCHOOL 9:45 A.M. 
WORSHIP 11:00 A.M. 
EVENING WORSHIP 
Rev. Letcher H. Reld 



Established... 



l«79n 



COLONNA'S 

SHIPYARD, INC. 

NORFOLK, VA. 

All Types Marine Repairs 

Diesel Enilne Specialist 



Established... 



t8«5n 



Established... 




Jrs> FOOTWEAR 

^oJ ^^^ ^'■^ ^"^ FAMILY 



SiNCt 1885 



tm 



JAMES G. GILL CO., INC. 

204 W. 22nd ST. 
NORFOLK, VA. 

622-3658 

"Coffee Importers and Roasters" 



^. 



Established... 



im 






DAIRIES, INC. 




St02 PRINCISS ANNE ROAD 

VIRGINIA BEACH, VA. 23462 

PHONi 497-3518 



Established... 



— «3e 

KELLAM & EATON 

INCORPORATED 

BUILDING SUPPLIES 



Established. 



EDGAR CAYCE 



FOUNDATION 

67th STRE£T 
VIR.BCH.,VA. 

t LIBRARY-DAILY 
9AM.S?M. 
FRI.-SAT.TILLIOPJ^. 



t FREE LECTURE 3 fM. ■ Daily 



mi 



Established... 




IMt 



BOICE STUDIO 

FINE PHOTOGRAPHY 

209 25th ST. 
^ 42B-500S^^ 



SERVING VIRGINIA SINCE 1918 



Established... 



1945n 




YOUR HOME IMPROVEMENT HEADQUARTERS 

545-4613 

"Be Certain With Burton" 



Established. 



^HOm 4«4-»Hl 



im-1 



313* sHodi pmvt must 



WI ePCCIALIZK IN CRAB aOUl* 

(SkarlU'i ^tafooa 

f\*ilauranl 

ViRoiNiA Beach. Va. 

-/lUJm _Am| Cm* 
St^tti •:• SttJn •!' Cktpt 
WC CATBR TO PRIVATK PARTICB 




aMOM DIMVI atTOMW LYNMM/IVtW imOCI t FT. 8T0«Y ON »T. tO 
CLOSED MONDAY 



Established... 



vm-\ 



Established. 



STANDARD OFFICE SUPPLYING. 
1673-C LASKIN RD. 

428-5731 

COMPLETE LINE OF OFFICE 
FURNITURE AND SUPPLIES 



1S47 



# 



SMITH AND KEENE 
ELECTRICAL SERVICE. INC. 

NORFOLK, VA. -' 

HELPING TO BUILD A BETTER 
VIRGINIA BEACH 



• . 



•i»v- 



Established. 



mi 



FILTER QUEEN OF VIRGINIA 

6225 Indian River Rd. 
* Virgly»ia Beach, Va. 

■ Phone 420-3930 



Under Same management for 22 years. 



a- 



Established... 



1954^ 



CHILDRESS MOTORS 

4830 Virginia Beach Blvd. 
Virginia. Beach, Va. - 499-8921 



"Satisfied Customers for 20 years." 



Established.., 



8 



«54n 



MUillPlE 

IISTING 

SERVICE 

MiS 



T)aoe JIQIIer 9?ea/iy, 9nc. 



REALTOR 



RURAL 
RESIDENTIAL 
COMMERCIAL 



1719 VIRGINIA BEACH BLVD 
VIRGINIA BEACH, VA. 23454 
OFFICE PHONE: 428-3*22 



Established.. 



iS54n 



BYLER REALTY CO., iNC. 

Specialists in Prime Properties in 
All Virginia Beach 

IB 

KEAUOR* 



3707 Virginia Beach Blvd. 
Virginia Beach, Virginia 23452 

340-8081 




Established. 



«6ft 



Established 




5125 Virginia Beach Blvd. Virginia Beach 




Established... 



mi 



Established.*. 



HARRIS ' 
TIRE SERVICE, INC. 

1469 N. MiHtary Highway 

Norfolk, Virginia 23502 
"The men who know tires best" 

855-6021 



im 



THANK YOU FOR YOUR 

PATRONAGE IN THE PAST 

BUDDY' BAIT BARN, INC. 

NORTHAMPTON BLVD. & BAKER ^D. 



464-6544 

All Types Fishing Tackel 
And Live Bait 



Esttblished.. 



«64 



For Profess/onol Insurance 

Service At No Extra cost See 



BUTLER INSURANCE 
-AGENCY/INC. 

1567 LASKIN RD. 

425-9101 




Established. 



© 



«64n 



Established.. 



Established... 



5266 H Princess Anne Road 

Virguiia Beach, Virginia 23462 
804/497-3524 



4 National A ssociation of R ealtors 

wjleiro Multiple Listing Service 

9 RELO-lnter-Clty Relocation Service 




tse5n 



HERJAC CORPORATION 



General Contractors/Developers 

P.O. Box 4326 Virginia Beach, Virginia 23454 
Telephone 804/486-6313 . 



ttse 



Vicginia Beach Free Will 
Baptist Church 

Witchduck Road m^ Expressway 

Virginia Beach, Va. 

We invite you to start this 
year with the reality of 
Christ in your life. 



Phone 499-3536 



Ray Berry • Pastor 



Established... 



ipro 



Established.. 



Boulevard 

Upholstery Co. 

217 London Bridge Rd. 
Virginia Beach, Va. 

Phone — 486-5366 




«6» 



405 S. Parliament Drive 

Virginia Beach, Virginia 23462 

Phone (703) 499-2303 



ANNE F. WINTER 

PRESIDENT 



RsgtaMrad and Llcantad Practical Nunat: Nur«*i' Aldat; 
Profaaaional Sinar* for Iha Youn«, tha Convalatcant and tha Agad 



Established... 



«6«-n 



Established. 



497-3530 



497-3539 



zniif-wttiX 
499-4990 



Complete line of replacement 
Parts and Equipment 

Carolanne Shopping Center 
5266 C Princess Anne Road 



tsesn 



SUMMIT ENTERPRISES, INC. 

309 Birchwood Park Drive 
Virginia Beach, Virginia 23452 

BUILDERS OF TOTAL LIVING 



•Manchaster Vlllag* 
*Churchland Wast 
•Starling Point 
•Nottlngharr* 



COMMUNITIES 



CONTACT MR. HOFFAMN: 486-6280 



EsttUidied.. 



-WW 



BAYSIDE HARDWARE 
HOUSE OF GLASS 



and 



VIEeiHIA EiEAeH POTTERY 

3^6 $hor9 Drive 
Virginia B««^ Va. 

4«MM67 or 464-3759 



EsttblishMl 




mmi^iidfBo^efm^ 



us 



ANN hmestle 

4CM4af 






Est^lishad... 



vm 



Established... 



BEACH CHEMICAL AND PAPER a).'# 

2325C VIRGINIA BEACH BLVD. 

Building Maintenance Materials 
And Paper Products 

340-6733 




m^ 



/ 



tma£ 

HOUSEam. 



COMPLETE SELECTION OF FORMAL WEAR 



33 SOUTHERN SHOPPING CENTER 

^ NORFOLK 583-0709 

536 INDEPENDENCE BLVD. 

VIRGINIA BEACH 499-061:^ 



% » 



Th« Sun-WWn«$day, January 16, 1974— Pajjt B-5 



ANOTHER YEAR OF SERVICE TO YOU 



Establtthed.. 



Wttn 



EstablistMd. 




Fine Family of 
Bread and Rolh" 



im 



Estabiiihad.. 



« 



ROYAL CROWN BOTTLING 

COMPANY, INC. 

ROYAL CROWNXIOLA 

705 W. 2M» ST. 

NORFOLK^ 

625-1668 




-EstabtJshteF^ 



'""^sf 




mf-] 



City Roofing 8e Construction Co. 



• ROOM ADDITIONS 

• ALUMINUM SIDING 

• ROOFING 

• GARAGES CONVERTED 



206 W. 25TH STREET 
NORFOLK. VIRGINIA 2351 7 
627-0100 



Established... 



; 



mi 



FRANK ATKINSON 

REAL ESTATE 

54th AND ATLANTIC 

428-4441 

JOHN^r. ATKINSON. SROKER 

Serving The Resort Area For 21 Years 




JOSEPH A. OULASH. JR. 

MANAOtK 



-1824-1 

''Our People 

Make Us 
Number One*' 



PHONE 407.3890 

4884.3 PEMBROKE MA|.L 

VIRGINIA BEACH/'VA. t34et 



Establishad... 



Establi^ad... 



im 



EMMANUEL TABERNACLE CHURCH 
UNITED PENTECOSTAL CHURCH 

157 Morrison A«o. - Virfiiiia Boach 

EVERYONE WELCOME 

7 —^PASTOR 

R3V. Haiold HuUon 
Phone: 340-73333 



AiBdaySdiool 10:00 A.M. 
Ev«iii«W(M*liip 7:30 P.M. 
Wed. Pray« Meeting 7:30 PJkl. 



W2t 



OCEAN VIEW GOLF COURSE 

9610 NORFOLK AVE' AVE. 588-9326 

STUMPY LAKE GOLF COURSE 

INDIAN RTVER RD. 4204834 

(EST, 19S7) 

2 Public 1 8-Hole Championdiip Golf Coiines to Serve You 

Leased aii^ Operated By Clarence I. Underwood 
Oaat "A" Muter Golf Profenibnal, PGA * 



Established.. 



tt4ri 



PhonIi (703) e27-tB94 



YATNER BROS. CO., 11. 

DIVISION OP KANI'MILLIN CORP. 

an WEST a4TH strcct. 

NO»»FOUK, VIWOINIA aS8l7 



MACS 

CANNID POOOt 

••KIRV iUPPLIIi 

■ANIT«llf tUPPLIIi 

MPIR lUPHlIO 

romiON CONTDOI. 
KIATi 

FROIIN rauiTi 

fhoiiii juicii 

PKOIIN VlaiTAlin 
PROIIN liAPOODt 

C'CST iON 



Established... 



\ 



1947 

BAILEY WEiDING 

180 Mac Street 

Virginia Beach, Va. 23462 

"Manufocfors of all types of 
fuel storage tanks'" 
497-4896 



Established... 



1947 



^ PRlfSI tLtCIftOOICS 




NCORPORATCO 



89B4I4I 



8431 TIDEWATER DRIVE 
NORFOLK. VA. 23808 



Established. 



1951 

BAILEY - PARKER 

CONSTRUCTION 

GREAT NECK ROAD 
VIRGINIA BEACH, VA. 



Ettabliihod. 



tm 



PRINCESS ANNE 
EQUIPMENT CORP. 

504 S. Military Higliway 

Virginia Beach, Va. Phone - 420-1840 



( 



Established. 



t955n 



SICASH BUILDERS, INC. 

VIRGINIA BEACH, VA 

BUILDERS AND DEVELOPERS 



Established... 




tm 



Established. 



TERRY CORPORATION 
OF VIRGINIA 

281 Independonce Blvd. 
Virginia Baacli, Va. 

Builders Of Confidence 




— »5t 

(Daan fieartiv 

^^ Restaurant 

AT THE MARINER RESORT MOTOR INN 
JTth fi Oceanfiont 426-1079 



Established... 



/ BOBSHEPPARD 

-X FRI.&SAT 



O AND HIS ORCHESTRA N 
. In The Compass ffoom ^ 



SUNDAYS 
TRY OUR GROANING BOARD BUFFET 
^ 2 . 5 P.M $3.25 BRIDGE PLAYERS WELCOME 



m& 



FOUNDRY UNITED METHODIST CHURCH 

— ^ _ _ 2801 Virginia Beach Blvd. 
Virginia Beach, Va. 
Phone: 340-5367 

"Beginning our 14th jrear in Virginia Beach." 
Com* worship with wi tv*ry 
Sunday at 11:00 AM. 

Harold F. Kirby, Miniiter 



Established. 



mi 



Established.. 



GREENWICH SUPPLY CORP. 

5788 ARROWHEAD DRIVE 

497^16^ 

Wholesale BOild'mg AAaierials Suppliers 






mi 



Established.. 



REwnr INC. 



SALES - RENTALS - INSURANCE 
CUSTOIVI BUILDING 

3700 S. PLAZA TRAIL 
486 - 4041 





isesn 



Established... 



A.C. CLARK COMPANY, INC. 

GENERAL BUILDING CONTRACTOR 
RESIDENTIAL-COMMERCIAL 

501 NORTH WITCH DUCK ROAD 
VIRGINIA BEACH, VIRGINIA 23462 

^— • — 

TELEPHONE 499-3741 



mf-^ 



KETON 

TRANSFER A STORAGE 

2644 DEAN DRIVt 

VIRGINIA BEACH, Va. 



Established. 



' MMC 



OHTROt. 
lUTIM 




lS6t 




A-ACTiVlTXTERimNAtlNG CO.. iNC 

IMC VmOINIA BKACH BLVD.. VA. BIACH. VA. a»4B4' 



feOB HUMPHREY 

PRItlOKNT 



OPPICB 



Established... 



We8n 



tj^oak Chuxch 




640 Kempsville Road -> 
P.O. Box 62461 
Pastors: Virginia Beach, Virginia 23462 
Rev. JohnGlmenez Rev. AnneN. GImenez 



Established... 



Mm-\ 



KEMPSVILLE PHARMACY 

329 KEMPSVILLE PLAZA 
SHOPPING CENTER 

PHiK^NiACI%l% 

R. W. Clayborn Linwood S. Leavitt 



Established. 



Uti 



19Do 



Sfflrv 



RESIDENTIAL SPECIALISTS" 

5691 Virginia Beech Boulevard 
Norfolk, Virginia 23502 



420-0940 



Established. 



PEOPLES BANK 



wet 



OF VIRGINIA BEACK 

*UVSKIN RD OFFICE *LYNN HAVEN OFRCE 

♦KEMPSVILLE OFFICE *BAYSIDE OFRCE 

♦CHINESE CORNER OFRCE *INDI AN RIVER OFRCE 



Established... 



itet 



PETROLEUM MARKETERS 



eapco 



^20 Southern nvd. 
Vli9niaBBach.Va. Rione 497^322 



Established. 



a* 



wet 



Estdilished. 



I DON'T BELIEVE MY EYES! 

I Have a Whole New Image 1 1 

My Hair is Healthy, Shapely, Natural. 

My Skin is Soft and Smooth, My Makeup Complete. 

I CALLED POLLY'S 
(TOTAL WOMEN) . 

LAFAYETTE YACHT CLUB COLLEGE PARK 

623-2202 420-2414 

NEAR MILITARY CIRCLE 

420-2727-420-8906 




MEliRO] 



Sell 



YOUR HOME 

QUICK AS 

LIGHTNING! 



CALL YOUR FAVORITE 
METRO MLS COMPANY 

(See Listing In Yellow Paget) 



Established... 



vm 



CONTRACTORS I LIGHTING CONSULTANT 
f A V At LABtE — "^ — ' 



WELCOML 



LIGHTING 




499-7M7 K e m m^ ill iWa aNippiniCeniir 



Esteblished. 



CAROL LEE 

DONUT SHOP 



206 23nl STREET 
VIR.ilCH.,V«GINlA 

• SUN.-THUR.6-6P.M. 

• FR1.&SAT.6-2AAI. 

SEE YOU AltOUHO LIKE A DONUT 



EstaUished... 




«7t 



EttiMished... 



HIUTOP ELECTRIC CO. 
4812240 

1568 FIRST COLONIAL ROAD 



ViR6INIA BEACH, VIRGINIA i3454 
RESIDENTIAL • INDUSTRIAL - COMMERCIAL 



j^mi. 



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'f' 



APPUANCIS 



Vcr. #each Blvd. 

Acrot$ From Beach Ford 

AU7HOHIZBD fRIOIDAIIti 
SALiS, PARTS A $MKVICi 

'We Servk:e What We Sell and What Othen Sell Too' 

, 340.ai04 ^ 



P»ge B-6-The Sun-Wednesday, January 16. 197^1 

'Critic's Choice' opens 

The comedy play "Critic's Clioice" will qpen tonight at 
die Cavalier Dinner Playhouse, 3517 Argonne Ave., 
Norfolk. 

"Critic's Choice," scheduled to run through Feb. 23, will 
,be presented nightly, Wednesday through Sunday. Doors 
^n at 6 p.m., buffet dinner is served at 6:45 and show 
tfine is 8:15. Tickets for the play and dinner 
afe $6.50 for week nights and Sunday and $7.95 
for Saturday. Reservations may be made by calling the 
box office at 855-6033. 



*: 



How to 




Dollars! 

TODAY, more th»n «v»r, w« ill nMd txptrt 
help In getting the mo« value for our expen- 
ditures. 

How to buy Intelligently. The bett way to 
guard agalmt ripoffi-and what to do when 
we an chatted. How to manege our nwney. 
You'll get thii vital tnntanca from Peter 
Weaver, the highly respected authority on con- 
sumer finence, author, editor and Associate 
ProfesKW at George Washington Universitv. 
To get the most from your precious dollars 
READ- 

Miful %Mfr Moficy 

by P«t*r W«av«r 

in 




mffW 



KtL 



LiGALS 



NOTICE OF 
PUBLIC HEARING 

The Virginia Beach 
Planning Commission will 
hold a Public Hearing on 
Tuesday, January 29, 1974, at 
9:00 A.M. in the Council 
L Chambers of the 

Administration Building, 
Princess Anne Courthouse, 
Virginia Beach, Virginia. 
The following applications 
will appear on the agenda: 



1. Petition by motion of 
the Virginia Beach Planning 
Commission to establish an 
Historic and Cultural District 
on certain property 
described as beginning at a 
point 2300 feet more or less 
East of Great Neck Road on 
the West side of Ferebee 
Cove of Broad Bay, running a 
distance of 1500 feet more or 
less along the Northern 
propeFty line, running a 
distance of 975 feet more or 
less along the Western 
property line, running a 
distance of 400 feet more or 
less along the Southern 



property line and following 
Broad Bay (Ferebee Cove) ,,i • • n .. r.. 
along^he Eastern proM^^r—^^if '".'^ ^?'='' /if,T 
line (said parcel conlStfl2J7«r?/,".L°2 ;!!.^.?»''J^?.1 
acres more or less) and to 
classify the property known 
as BROAD BAY MANOR 
located at 1696 North Great 
Neck Road as an historical 
site deemed desirable for 
preservation. Plats with 
mortif detailed information 
are available in the 
Department of Planning. 
(Broad Bay Area). LYNN- 
HAVEN BOROUGH. 

2. Petition by motion of the 
Virginia Beach Planning 
Commission to establish an 
Historic and Cultural District 
on certain property 
described as beginning at a 
point 17(X) feet more or less 
North of Great Neck Road 
East of Frank W. Cox High 
School, running a distance of 
700 feet more or less along 
jthe Northern property line 
((Broad Bay), running a 
distance of 100 feet ntore or 
less along the Eastern 
property line, running a 

-distance of 415 feet more or 
less along the Southern 
property line and running a 
distance of 940 feet more or 
less along the Western 
property line (said parcel 
contains 12.41 acres more or 
less) andtoi classify tho 
property known as GREEN 
HILL FARM as an 
historical site deemed 
desirable for preservation. 
Piats with more detailed 
information are available 
in the Department of 
Planning. (Broad Bay 
Area). LYNNHAVEN 
BOROUGH. 

3. Petition by motion of the^ 
Virginia Beach Planning 
Commission to establish an 
Historic and Cultural District 
on certain property located 
on the South side of Adam 
iKeeling Road, beginning at a 
point 3700 feet more or less 
West of Great Neck Road, 
running a distance of 200 feet 
along the South side of Adam 
Keeling Road, running a 
distance of 235 feel more or 
less along the Eastern 
property line, running a 
distance of 280 feet more or 
less along the Southern 
property line and running a 
distance of 325 feet more or 
less along the Western 
property line (said parcel 
contains 1.08 acres more or 
less) and to classify the 
pr(H)erty known as ADA^\ 
ICEELING HOUSE located 
at 3157 Adam Keeling Road 
as an historical site deemed 
desirable tor preservation. 
Plats with nnore detailed 
information are available in 
the Department of Planning. 
(Great Neck Point Area). 
LYNNHAVEN BOROUGH. 

4. Petition by motion of the 
Virginia Beach Planning 
Commission to establish an 
Historic and Cultural Ois- 
trjct on certain property 
described as beginning at a 
point 500 feet more or less 
North of the intersection of 
Kempsvllle Road, Princess 
Anne Road and Bonney Road 
(proposed as South Witch- 
dock Road), running a 
distance of 660 feet along the 
West side (^ Bonney Road 
(proposed as South Witch 
duck Road), running a 
distance of 610 feet more or 
less along the Northern 
prope rty line, running a 
distancrof 'XO feet more or 
less along the Western 
proparty line and runnirtg a 
distance of 600 feet more or 
less along the Southern 
prapcrty lir«e (said parcel 
ooiMns A.97 acres more or 
l«H) ma U> classify ttie 
pr^Mrty known as .the 
KEMPSVILLC JAIL loccted 
at Stn Bonney Road as an 
l»^»^»c«l site tlffmfjl 

^ Ik Mwvanuii. 



Plats with more detailed 
information are available in 
the Department of Planning. 
(KempsvilleArea). KEMPS- 
VILLE BOROUGH. 

5. Petition by motion of the 
Virginia Beach Planning 
Commission to establish an 
Historic and Cultural District 
on certain property 
described as the Eastern 
extremity of Harlie Avenue 
and Trestman Avenue and 
the East side of Harlie Ct., 
running a distance of 700 feet 
more or less alOng the 
Western property line, 
running a distance of 470 feet 
more or less along the 
Southern property line, 
running a distance of 280 feet 
more or less along the 
Eastern property line and 
i;unning a distance of 780 feet 
more or less along the 
Northern property line (said 
parcel contains 6.7 acres 
more or less) and to classify 
the property known as the 
RICHARD MURRAY 
HOUSE located at 3300 
Harlie Avenue as an 
historical site ^ deemed 
desirable for preservation. 
Plats with more detailed 
information are available in 
the Department of Planning. 
(Sherry Park Area). 
KEMPSVILLE BOROUGH. 

6. Petition by motion of the 
Ing 

an 

Historic and Cultural District 

on certain property 

described as beginning at a 

point 475 feet more or less 

West of Sale Drive and 

running a distance of 200 feet 

more or less along the West 

side of South Crestline Drive, 

running a distance of 300 
' feet more or less along 

the Northern property line, 

running a distance of 550 

feet more or less along the 

Western property line and 

running a distance of 280 feet 

more or less along the 

Southern property line (said 

parcel contaira 2.2 acres 

more or less) and to classify 

the property known as the 

THOMAS MURRAY HOUSE 

located at 3425 South 

Crestline Drive as an 

historical site deemed 

desirable for preservation. 

Plats with more detailed 

information are available in 

the Department of Planning. 

(Elizabeth River Shores 

Area). KEMPSVILLE 

BOROUGH. 

7. Petition by motion of the 
Virginia Beach Planning 
Commission to establish an 
Historica and Cultural 
District on certain property 
described as the North and 
South sides of North Witch- 
duck Road East of 
Cathedral Drive, (a) running 
a distance of 950 feet along 
the South side of North 
Witchduck Road, running a 
distance of 400 feet along the 
West side of Donation Drive, 
running a distance of 900 feet 
more or less along the 
Southern projierty line and 
running a distance of 190 feet 
more or less along the 
Western property line (said 
parcel contains 5.34 acres 
more or less); (b) running a 
distance of 640 feet more or 
less along the North side of 
North Witchduck Road 
across from Cathedral Drive, 
running a distance of 115 feet 
more or less along the 
Western property line, 
running a distance of 610 feet 
more or less along the 
Northern property line and 
running a distance of 140 feet 
more or less along the 
Eastern property line (said 
parcel contains 1.83 acres 
more or less) and to classify 
the property known as OLD 
DONATION CHURCH 
located at 4449 North Witch- 
duck Road as an historical 
site deemed desirable for 
preservafion. Plats with 
more detailed information 
are available In the 
Department of Planning. 
(Donation Shores Area). 
BAYSIDE BOROUGH. 

8. Petition by motton of the 
Virginia Beach Planning 
Commission to establish an 
Historic and Cultural District 
on certain property 
described as located at the 
intersection of Hinsdale 
Street and Constitution 
Avenue North of Jonathan 
Court, running a distance of 
350 feet more or less along 
the Northern property line 
and running a distarKe of 350 
feet more or less along tt»e 
Southern property lirw (said 
parcel is irregtflar in shape) 
and to classify ttie property 
known as PEMBROKE 
MANOR as an hitiorical site 

d e slra W e ly ^ii,^::^ 



North side of Princew Anne 
Road East and West of 
Overland Road, running a 
distance of 825 feet along the 
North side of Princess Anne 
Road, running a distance of 
550 feet more or less along 
the Western property line, 
running a distance of 915 feet 
more or less along the 
Northern property line and 
running a distance of 520 feet 
more or less along the West 
side of Bonney Road 
(proposed North Witchduck 
Road) (said parcel contains 
9.2 acres more or less) and to 
classify the property known 
as PLEASANT HALL 
(PETER SINGLETON 
HOUSE) located at 5184 
Princess Anne Road as an 
historical site deemed 
desirable for preservation. 
Plats with more detailed 
informatton are available In 
the Department of Planning. 
(Kempsvllle Area). KEMPS- 
VILLE BOROUGH. 

10. Petition by motion of 
the Virginia Beach Planning 
Commission to establish an 
Historic and Cultural District 
on certain property 
described as located on the 
South side of side of Virgjnla 
Beach Boulevard across 
from Little Neck Road, 
running a distance of 1100 
feet more or less along the 
South side of Virginia Beach 
Boulevard, running a 
distance of 720 feet along the 
Eastern property line, 
running a distance of 870 feet 
more or less along the 
Southern property line and 
running a distance of 1250 
feet more or less along the 
Western property line (said 
parcel contains 18.6 acres 
more or less) and to classify 
the property known as ROSE 
HALL located at 3133 
Virginia Beach Boulevard as 
an historical site deemed 
desirable for preservation. 
Plats with more detailed 
information are available in. 
the Department of Planning. 
(Princess Anne Plaza- - 
Groveland Park-Belle Haven 
Areas). LYNNHAVEN 
BOROUGH. 

11. Petition by motion of 
the Virginia Beach Planning , 
Commission to establish an 
Historic and Cultural District 
on certain property 
described as located on the 
East side of Parish Road 
between Club Circle and 
Thoroughgood Drive, run- 
ning a distance of 500 feet 
along the East side of Parish 
Road, running a distance of 
390 feet along the South side 
of Thoroughgood Drive, 
running a distance of 480 feet 
along the Eastern property 
line and running a distance of 
340 feet along the Southern 
property line of which 240 
feet is the North side of Club 
Circle (said iiarcel contains 
3.48 acres more or less) and 
to classify the property 
known as ADAM 

THOROUGHGOOD HOUSE 
located at 1636 Parish Road 
as an historical site deemed 
desirable for preservation. 
Plats with more detailed 
Information are available in 
the Department of Planning. 
(Thoroughgood Area). 
BAYSIDE BOROUGH. 

12. Petition by motion of 
the Virginia Beach Planning 
Commission to establish an 
Historic and Cultural District 
on certain property 
described as beginning at a 
point 2600 feet more or less 
West of Air Station Drive, 
and 430 feet more or less 
North of Potters Drive, 
running a distance of 890 feet 
more or less along the 
Southern property line 
(Norfolk and Southern 
Railway Right of Way), 
running a distance of 1220 
feet more or less along the 
Eastern property line, 
running a distance of 1250 
feet more or less along the i 
Northern property line and 
running a distance of 1190 
feet more or less along the 
Western property line (said 
parcel contains 30.25 acres 
more or less) and to classify 
the property known as the 
UPPER WOLFSNARE 
HOUSE located at 2040 
Potters Road as an historical 
site deemed desirable for 
preservation. Plats with 
more detailed information 
are available in the 
Department of Planning. 
(Oceana Naval Air Station 
Area). LYNNHAVEN 
BOROUGH. 

13J Petition by motion of 
the-f irglnla Beach Planning 
Commission to establish an 
Historic and Cultural District 
on certain property 
described as beginning at a 
point at the Nortt>eastern 
extremity of AAoores Pond 
Road and 4800 feet more or 
less East of Baker Road, 
running a distance of 500 feet 
more or less along the 
Southern property line, 
running a distarKe of 410 feet 
more or less along the 
Eastern property line, 
running a distance of 325 feet 
more or less along the 
Northern property line and, 
running a distance of 490 feet 
more or less along the 
Western property line (said 
parcel contains 3.54 acres 
more or less] and to classify 
the property known as 
WEBLIN HOUSE tocated at 
5588 Moores Pond Road as to 
historical site deemed 
desirable for preservation. 
Plats with more detailed 
information are available in 
the Department of Planning. 
(Lawson Forest Area). 
BAYSIDE BOROUGH. 

14. Petition by motion of 
the Virginia Beach Planning 
Commission to establish an 
Historic and Cultural District 
on certain property 
described as belnning at a 
point 520 feet more or less 
East of Donation Drive, 
running a distance of 270 feet 
more or less along the South 
side of Wlshart Road, run- 
ning a distance of 660 feet 
more or less along the 
Eastern property line, 
running a distance of 50 feet 
more or less alor«g the 
Southern property line and 
running a distance of 670 feet 
more or less along the 
Western property line (said 
parcel contains 2.9 acres 
more or less) and to classify 
the property known as the 
WISHART HOUSE located 
on Wlshart Road as an 
historical site deemed 
desirable for preservation, 
itelalled 



185 feet more or less along 
the Wast side of Wast 
Plantathm Road, running a 
distance of 125 feet more or 
less along the Southern 
property line, running a 
distance of 180 feet oKH-e or 
less along the Western 
property line and running a 
distance of 140 feet more or 
less along the Northern 
property line (said parcel 
contains 24,829 square feet 
more or less) and to classify 
the property kriown as» 
WOLFSNARE PLANTA- 
TION HOUSE located at 513 
West Plantation Road known 
as Lot 12, Block H, Plat of 
Point O' Woods as an ' 
historical site deemed 
desirable for preservation. 
Plats with more detailed 
information are available in 
the Department of Planning. 
(Point 0' Woods Area). 
LYNNHAVEN BOROUGH. 
16. Petition by motion of the 
Virginia Beach Planning 
Commission to establish an 
Historic and Cultural District 
on certain property 
described as beginning at. a 
point 3875 feet more or less 
Northwest of Oceana 
Boulevard and 760 feet more 
or less North of London 
Bridge Road, running a 
distance of 245 feet more or 
less along the Southern 
property line, running a 
distance of 370 feet more or 
less ^long the Western 
property line, running a 
distance of 240 feet more or 
less along the Northern 
property line and running a 
distance of 630 feet more or 
less along the Eastern 
property line (said parcel 
contains 2.9 acres more or 
less) and to classify the 
property known as the 
JONATHAN WOODHOUSE 
HOME as an historical site 
deemed desirable for 
preservation. Plats with 
more detailed Information 
are available In the De- 
partment of Planning. 
(Princess Anne Hunt Club 
Area). PRINCESS ANNE 
BOROUGH. 

All interested persons are 
Invited to attend. 

Charles C. Carrlngton 
Director of Planning 

11«,l-23-2t 



against 

J. Thomas Bernard, 

Defendant. 

The oblect of this suit Is to 
obtain a divorce a mensa et 
thoro to be later meri^ into 
a decree of divorce a vinculo 
matrimonii from the said 
defendant, upon the grounds 
of desertion as of August 13, 
1973. 

And an affidavit having 
been made and filed that the 
defendant is a non-resident of 
the State of Virginia, the last 
known post office addrisss 
being: Box 284, Geneva, 
Fk>rida 23732 

It Is ordered that he do 
appear here within ten (10) 
days after due publication 
hereof, and do what may be 
necessary to protect his 
interest in this suit. 

John V. Fentress, Clerk 
J. Curtis Fruit, D.C. 

Boyce & Spanoulis 
105 N. Plaza Trail 
Virginia Beach, Virginia 



ORDER OF 
PUILICATION 



.. Mary ^,„, 

Mary Louise McDonald 

Plaintiff, 

against 

Richard Glen McDonald, 

Defendant. 



The oblect of this suit Is to 
obtain a divorce a vinculo 
matrimonii from the said 
defendant, upon the grounds 
of constructive desfrtlon. 

And an affidavit having 
been made and filed that the 
defendant is a non-resident of 
the State of Virginia, the list 
known post office address 
beffig: c-o Leatrlce 
McDonald, 7974 24th Street, 
N., St. Pertersburg, Florida 

It Is ordered that he do 
appear here within ten (10) 
days after due publicatkm 
hereof , and do what may be 
necessary to protect his 
Interest in this su!f. 



GRAYSON A. PR^CE, 
HELEN PRICE, WESLEY 
L<o4»«^ W. PRICE, VIVIAN PRICE, 
and if they or any or them be 
deadtheir surviving spouses. 
Wanyj, (jelrs ai law, devisees, 
executors and-or ad- 
ministrators, the lien 
creditors of any and all of 
said parties, if any there be, 
and all other persons having 
an Interest in the property to 
be condemned In these 
proceedings, the names and 
addresses of said parties 
being unknown, and art 
hereby proceeded against as 
"Parties Unknown"; and .98 
Acre, more or less, land, in 
Princess Anne Borough, 
Virginia Beach, Virginia. 



Defendants. 



ORDER OF 
PUBLICATION 



1-16, 



u 



i,2-«-4T 



Commonwealth of Virginia, 
In the Clerk's Office of the 
Circuit Court of the City of 
Virginia Beach, on the 10th 
day of January, 1974. 

ORDER OF 
PUBLICATION — 



Commonwealth of Virginia, 
In the Clerk's Office of the 
Circuit Court of the City of 
Virginia Beach, on the 8th 
day of January, 1973. 

ORDER OF 
PUBLICATION 

William Vernon Cason, 

Plaintiff, 

against 

Clestlne Detoree^ason;— 

Defendant. 

The object of this suit Is to 
obtain a divorce A vinculo 
MatrlnFMjnll from the said 
defendant, u|3on the grounds 
of two (2) years continuous 
separation. 

And an affidavit having 
been made and filed that the 
defendant is not a resident of 
the State of Virginia, the last 
known post office address 
being: c-o General Delivery, 
Spring Valley, New York 

It is ordered that she do 
appear here within ten (10) 
days after due publication 
hereof, and do what may be 
necessary to protect her 
interest in this suit. 

John V. Fentress: Clerk 
Sandra Hargrove, D.C. 

Broyles, McKenry, Gorry 

Dills 

3500 Pacific Ave. 

Virginia Beach, VA, p.q. 



M«,23,30,2-6-4T 



John M. Stone, 

Plaintiff, 

against 

Peggy Stone, 

Defendant. * ' 

The object of %ls suit Is to 
obtain a divorce a vinculo 
matrimonii from the said 
defendant upon the grounds 
9t desertion. * 

And an affidavit having 
been made and filed that the 
defendant is a non resident of 
the State of Virginia, the last 
known post office address 
being: 937 Avandale Avenue, 
Holly Hill, Florida 32107 

It is ordered that she do 
appear here within ten (10) 
days after due publication 
hereof, and do what may be 
necessary to protect her 
interest in this suit. 

John V. Fentress, Clerk 
J. Curtis F?uit, D.C. 

Bangel, Bangel & Bangel, 

p.q. 

Law Building 

Portsmouth, Virginia 

1-16,23,30,2-6-4T 



Commonwealth of Virginia, 
In the Clerk's Office of the 
Circuit Court of the City of 
Virginia Beach, on the 9th 
day of January, 1974. 

ORDER OF 
PUBLICATION 

Frances E. Tollson, 

Plaintiff, 

against 

Robert A. Tollson, 

Defendant. 

The object of this suit is to 
obtain a divorce a mensa et 
thoro to be later merged into 
a divorce A Vinculo 
Matrimonii from the said 
defendant, upon the grounds 
of desertion. 

And an affidavit having 
been made and filed that the 
defendant is a non-resident of 
the state of Virginia, the last 
known post office address 
being: c-o Warrant Officers 
Mess, USS Independence, 
CV-62, CO FPO, New York, 
N.Y. 09501 

It is ordered that he do' 
appear here within ten (10) 
days after due publication 
hereof, and do what may be 
necessary to protect his 
interest in this suit. 

John V. Fentress: Clerk 
Sandra Hargrove, D.C. 

Broyles, Mckenry, Gorry & 

Dills 

3500 Pacific Avenue 

Virginia Beach, Virginia, 

23451 

1 16,23,30,2 6-4T 



Commonwealth of Virginia, 
In the Cler|('s Office of the 
Circuit Court of the City of 
Virginia Beach, on the 8th 
day of January, 1974. 

ORDER OF 
PUBLICATION 

Frederick A. Haycox, Jr., 

Plaintiff, 

against 

Claudlne Cook Haycox, 

Defendant. 

The object of this suit is to 
obtain a divorce a mensa et 
thoro to be later merged into 
a divorce a vinculo 
matrimonii from the said 
defendant, upon the grounds 
of desertion. 

And an affidavit having 
been made and filed that the 
defendant is a non-resident of 
the State of Virginia, the last 
known post office address 
being: Iphikas No. 660, 
Athens, Greece 

It Is ordered that she do 
appear here within ten (10) 
da^s after due publication 
hereof, and do what may be 
necessary to protect her 
interest in this suit. 

John V. Fentress: Clerk 
J. Curtic Fruit, D.C. 

Edward T. Caton, III 
2508 Pacific Avenue 
P.O. Box 42 
Virginia Beach, Virginia 

l-16,23,30,2-6-4T 



Commonwealth of Virginia, 
In the Clerk's Office of the 
Circuit Court of the City of 
Virginia Beach, on the 28th 
day of December, 1973. 

ORDER OF 
PUBLICATION 



Emma K. 
Plaintiff, 



Bernard, 



Comnwnwealtti of Virginia, 
In the Clerk's Office of the 
Circuit Court of the City of 
VirginJa Beach, on the 7th 
day of January, 1974. 

ORDER OF 
PUBLICATION 

Wanda Jane Gooch, 

Plaintiff, 

against 

Stanley Lee Gooch, 

Defendant. 

Theobjecf of this suit is to 
obtain a divorce vinculo 
matrlomli from the said 
defendant, upon the grounds 
of desertion for more than 
one year. 

And an affidavit having 
been made and filed that the 
defendant is a non-resident of 
the State of Virginia, the last 
known post office address 
being: Muncie, III. 

It is ordered that he do 
appear here within ten (10) 
days after due publication 
hereof, and do what may be 
necessary to protect his 
Interest in this suit. 

John V. Fentress: Clerk 
Sandra Hargrove, D.C. 
Garland M. Layton 
1510 Pleasure House Road 
Virginia Beach, Virginia 

1-16,23,30,2-«-4T 



Commonwealth of Virginia, 
In the Clerk's Office of the 
Circuit Court of the City of 
Virginia Beach, on the 7th 
day of January, 1974. 



John V. Fentress, Clerk 
Sandra Hargrove, D.C. 

Murphy, Bennett & Basnight, 

Ltd. 

3330 Pacific Avenue 

Virginia Beach, Vb. 23451 

l-16,23,30,2-6-4T 



Commonwealth of Virginia, 
In the Clerk's Office of the 
Circuit Court of the City of 
Virginia Beach, on the 3rd 
day of January, 1974. 

ORDER OF 

PUBLICATION 

Terry Elizabeth Russo Horst, 

Plaintiff, 

against 

Randolph Booth Horst, 

Defendant. 

The object of this suit Is to 
obtain a divorce a vinculo 
matrimonii from the said 
defendant, upon the grounds 
of having lived separate and 
apart without any 
cohabitations and without 
interruption from more than 
two (2) years. 

And an affidavit having 
been made and filed that the 
defendant is a non-resident of 
the State of Virginia, the last 
known post office address 
.being: RFD No. 2, Box 586- B, 
Roanoke Rapids, North 
Carolina 

It is ordered that he do 
appear here within ten (10) 
days after due publication 
hereof, and do what may be 
necessary to protect his 
interest in this suit_„ 

John V. Fentress: Clerk 
Sandra Hargrove, D.C. 

Ann E. Calevas - 

604 Plaze One Building 
Norfolk, Virginia 

'-16, 23, 30, 2-6-4T 



Commonwealth of Virginia, 
In the Clerk's Office of the 
Circuit Court of the City of 
Virginia Beach, on the 7th 
day of January, 1974. 

ORDER OF 
PUBLICATION 

Donnle William Miller, 

Plaintiff, 

against 

Charlie Sue Miller, 

Defendant. 

The object of this suit is to 
obtain a divorce a vinculo 
matrimonii from the said 
defendant, upon the grounds 
of two years separation. 

And an affidavit 
having been made and filed 
that the defendant is a non- 
resident of the State of 
Virginia, the last known post 
office address being: 1802 E. 
Market Street, Enid, 
Oklahoma 

It is ordered that she do 
appear here within ten (10) 
days after due publication 
hereof, and do what may be 
necessary to protect her 
Interest in this suit. 

John V. Fentress: Clerk 
Sandra Hargrove, D.C. 

Murphy, Bennett & Basnight, 

Ltd. 

3330 Pacific Avenue 

Virginia Beach, Virginia, 

p-q. 

1-16, 23, 30, 2-6-4T 



VIRGINIA: 

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT 
OF THE CITY OF 
VIRGINIA BEACH 



CITY 

BEACH, 

poration. 



OF VIRGINIA 
A Munici|3al cor- 



In this proceeding the 
petittoner seeks to acquire by 
condemnation the fee simple 
title to a certain parcel of 
land situated in Princess 
Anne Borough of the City of 
Virginia Beach, Virginia, for 
the uses and purpose of 
the petitioner, to wit, for the 
expansion of the municipal 
government complex at 
Princess Anne Station, the 
nator^ of the works and 
improvements being more 
paH'cularly described in the" 
petition and exhibit attached 
thereto on file in the office of 
the clerk of this court, to 
which reference is hereby 
Oiadefor a full and accurate 
description thereof; and for 
the appointment of com- 
missioners to ascertain! just 
compensation to the owners 
of any estate or Interest m 
the property to be taken or 
affected as a result of the 
taking and use thereof by the 
petitioner. 

For such purposes, the 
petitioner will apply to the 
court, sitting at Princess 
Anne Courthouse, Virginia 
Beach, Virginia, on the 30111 
day of January, 1974, at 9:30 
o'clock a.m., or as soon 
thereafter as counsel may be 
heard, for the appointment of 
commissioners to ascertain 
just compensation ^ 
aforesaid. 

And it appearing by af- 
fidavit filed a^ccording to law 
that the following owners are 
believed by the petitioner not 
to be residents of the State of 
Virginia, to wit: Grayson A. 
Price, Helen Price, Wesley 
W. Price and Vivian Price; 
that the last known addresses 
of Grayson A. Price and 
_ Helen Price was Jessups, 
Maryland, and that Of Wesley 
W. Price and Vivian Price 
was Mewberry, 
AAassachusetts; that if they 
or any of them be dead, their 
surviving spouses, if any,, 
heirs at law, devfsees, 
executors and-or ad- 
ministrators, the lien 
creditors of any and all of 
said parties, if any there be, 
and all other isersons having 
an interest in the property to 
be condemned in these 
proceedings, are unknown to 
the petitioner. 

It is accordingly OR- 
DERED that the aforesaid 
owners do appear within ten 
(10) days after due 
publication of this order In 
the Clerk's Office of the ' 
Circuit Court of the Cty of ' 
Virginia Beach, Virginia, 
and do what is necessary to 
protect their Interests; and it 
Is FURTHER ORDERED 
that If any of the above 
named owners desires to 
assert any objection or 
defense to the taking or 
damaging of his proiierty or 
to the jurisdiction of the court 
to hear the case and to 
proceed with the ap- 
pointment of commissioners 
he shall fife his answer and 
grounds of defense 
designating the property in 
which he clal/ns to be in- 
terested, the grounds of any 
objectionr defense to the 
taking or damaging of his 
property or to the jurl^ic- 
tion of the court to hear the 
case and to proceed with the 
appointment of com- 
missioners for the deter- 
mination of just com- 
pensation. 

Should any such owner fail 
to file his answer and 
grounds of defense as 
hereinat)ove provided, such 
failure shall not preclude the 
owner from appearing on the 
date set for the appointment 
of commissioners nor from 
presenting evidence as to 
valuation and damage nor 
from sharing in the award of 
just compensation according 
to his Interest therein or 
otherwise protecting his- 
rights, but such failure shall 
preclude such owner from 
anyother defenses by wayof 
pleas in bar, abatement or 



day of January, I9th 1974. 

Linda Marie Olson, Plaintiff, 

against 

Walter Edward Olson, 

Defendant. 

Tha object of tttis suit is to 
obtain a divorce A Vinculo 
Matrimonii from the said 
defendant, upon the grounds 
of two years separation.And 
an aHidavit having been 
made and filed that the 
defendant Is not a resident of 
the State of Virginia, the last 
known post office address 
being: Barnard Hall, 1330 G 
Kobbe Avenue, Presidio, 
San Francisco, California It 
is ordered that he do appear 
here within ten (10) days 
after due publication hereof, 
and do what may be 
necessary to protect his 
Interest In this suit. 
James & Consolvo 
3221 Virginia Beach Blvd. 
Virginia Beach, VA. p.q. 

John V. Fentress: Clerk 
By: Sandra Hargrove D., 
Clerk. 



And an affidavit having 
been made and filed that 
the defendant is. not a 
'esident of the State of 
Virginia, the last known 
post office address being: 
P.O. Box 96, electric 
Alabama. 

It is ordered that he do ' 
appear here within ten (10) 
days after due publication 
hereof, and do what may be 
necessary to protect his 
interest In this ault. ' 



JOHN 
CLERK 



FENTRESS: 



William H. Colona, Jr. 
281 Independence Blvd. 
Va. Beach, VA 

1-16,23,30,2-6-4T 



Commonwealth of Virginia, 

In the Clerk's Office of 

the Circuit Court of the City 

of Virginia Beach, on the 



1-16,23,30,2-6 4+ 



LEGAL NOTICE 



By order of the United 
States District Court, 
Western District of Virginia, 
effective June 11, 1973, all 
children under the age of 18 
who are otherwise eligible 
for Aid to Dependent 
Children must he given such 
assistance. Irrespective of 
school attendance. 4 e 

In a subsequent order on 
September 19, 1973, the Court 
ruled that eligibility and 
entitlement to such benefits , 
with respect to children 16 
and 17 years of age found 
ineligible for assistance prior 
to the June ruling, was ef- 
fective no earlier than 
June 11, 1973. 

In accordance with these 
Court rulings the State 
Department of Welfare and 
Institutions eliminated the 
requirement of school at- 
tendance as a condition of 
eligijjiirty for ADC with 
respect to 16 and 17 year old 
children and notifed local 
welfare departments that, as 
of June 11, 1973, all children 
under 18 who are otherwise 
eligible mifej^be given such 
assistance, irrespective of 
school attendance. Local 
departments were also 
directed to make all 
reasonable efforts to identify 
each child affected by these 
Court rulings by searching 
their records and sending 
individual notices with 'the 
November checks of current 
Aid to Dependent Children 
recipients. However, any 
parent or relative who has in 
his care a child 16 or 17 years 
of age whose eligibility for 
Aid to Dependent Children 
benefits may have been 
affected by these rulings 
should contact the local 
welfare department In the 
locality where he is living for 
clarification of possible 
entitlement to such benefits. 



11th day 

Linda 

Plaintiff, 

against 

Walter 



of January, 1974. 
Marie Olson, 



Edward Olson, 



Defendant. 



ORDER OF 
PUBLICATION 

The object of this suit Is to 
obtain a divorce A Vinculo 
Matrimonii from the said 
defendant, upon the 
grounds of two years 
separation. 

And an affidavit having 
been made and filed that the 
defendant is not a resident 
of the State of Virginia, the 
last known post office 
address being: Barnard 
Hall, 1330 G Kobbe Avenue, 
Presidio, San Francisco, 
California. 

It is ordered that he do 
appear here within fen (10) 
days after due publication 
hereof, and do what may be 
necessary to protect his 
interest in this suit. 



FENTRESS: 



Hargrove, D. 



JOHN V. 
CLERK 
BY Sandra 
Clerk 

James & Consolvo 

3221 Virginia Beach Blvd. 

Virginia Beach, VA 

1-|6,23,30,2-6-4T 



VIRGINIA: 

' IN THE CLERK'S OF- 
FICE OF THE CIRCUIT 
COURT OF THE CITY OF 
VIRGINIA BEACH, ON THE 
2nd D AY OF JANUARY . 
1974. ' — T 



VIRGINIA DEPARTMENT 
OF WELFARE AND IN- 
STITUTIONS; RICHMOND 

1-16-8T 



ORDER OF 
PUBLICATION 

Commonwealth of Virginia, 
In the Clerk's Office of the 
Circuit Court of the City of 
Virginia Beach on the 11th 
day of January, 1974. 
Delberta J. Hall, Plaintiff, 
against 

Jessie Ralph Hall, Defen- 
dant. 

The object of this suit is to 
obtain a divorce A Vincolo 
Matrimonii from the said 
defendant, upon the grounds 
of desertion. And an affidavit 
having been made and filed 
that the defendant is not a 
resident of the State of 
Virginia, the last known post 
office address being: P.O. 
Box 96, Electric, Ala- 
bama, it is ordered 
that he do appear here 
within ten (10) day's'after due 
publication hereof, and do 
what may be necessary to 
protect his interest in this 
suit. 

William H. Cotona, Jr. 
281 Independence Blvd. 
Va. Beach, VA. p.q. 
John V. Fentress: Clerk 

' 1 - )6, 23, 30, 2-6-4+ 



In re: Adoption of Kim- 
berly Ann Sutton 
By: Stephen Charles Roggy 
and Linda Marie Cole Sutton: 
Roggy (Natural Mother) 

To: Charles Augustus Sutton 
3884 M Street 
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 

IN CHANCERY 
C-73-I672 

ORDER 



1 



This day came Stephen 
Charles Roggy and Linda 
Marie Cole Sutton Roggy, 
Petitioners,. and repri»sented 
that the object of this 
proceeding is to effect the 
adoption of the above named 
infant, Kimberly Ann Sutton, 
by Stephen Charles Roggy 
and Linda Marie Cole Sutton 
Roggy, husband and wife, 
and affidavit having been 
made and filed that Charels 
Augustus Sutton, a natural 
parent of said child, is a non- 
resident of the State of 
Virginia, the last known post 
office address being : 3884 M 
Street, Philadelphia, Penn- 
sylvania. 

It is therefore Ordered that 
the said Charles Augustus 
Sutton appear before this 
Court within ten (10) days 
after publication of this Orer 
and indicate his attitude 
toward the proposed adop- 
tion, or otherwise do what is 
necessary to protect his 
Interest in this matter. 

A copy teste: 

John V. Fentress, Clerk 

By: J. Curtis Fruit, D.C. 

John D. Hooker, Jr. , p.q. 
3707 Virginia Beach Blvd. 
Virginia Beach, Virginia 
23452 



1-9, 16, 



23, 30-4T 



Petitioner, 



LAW NO. L-2A 



vs 



MARIAN G. PRICE 
2460 North Landing Road 
Virginia Beach, Virginia; 

LILLIE BELLE 

WOODHOUSE, 

2468 North Landing Road, 

Virginia Beach, Virginia; 

GLORIA P. TUCCILLE and 
ROBERT R. TUCCILLE, 
328 Hannibal Street, 
Virginia Beach, Virginia; 



otherwise. 

KELLAM, PICKRELL & 

LAWLER, p.q. 

(James M.P4ckrell) 

1020 FirSt'81 Merchants Bank 

Bulldlrtg 

Norfolk, Virginia 23510 

John V. Fentress, Clerk 
Gladys J. Coalroy, D.C. 

1-16,23,30,2-6-4T 



ORDER OF 
PUBLICATION 

Commonwealth of Virginia, 

In the Clerk's Office of the 

Circuir Court of the City of 

Virginia Beach, on the 11th 



Commonwealth of Virginia, 
In the Clerk's Office of 
the Circuit Court of the City 
of Virginia Beach, on the 
nth day of January, 1974. 
Delberta J. Hall, Plaintiff, 
against 

Jessie Ralph Hall, 
Defendant. 



ORDEROF 
PUBLICATION 

Theobjectof thissuit is to 
obtain a divorce A Vinculo 
Matrimonii from the said 
defendant, upon the 
grounds of desertion. 



TV 



Commonwealth of Virginia, 
In the Clerk's Office of the 
Circuit Court of the City of 
Virginia Beach, on the 2nd 
day of January, 1974 

ORDEROF 
PUBLICATION 3 

4 

Annie H. Lynch, Plaintiff, j 

against 

Levi Lynch, Defendant. < 

The object of this suit is to f. 
obtain a decree of divorce a 
vinculo matrimonii from the 
said defendant, upon the 



7 



ESTABLISHED... 



1934 



preservation. Plats with 
more detailed informatton 
are aval labile in the 
DefMrtment of Planning. 

BAYSlofL^U^H*''*"'^""^'^'"''' ^'^^^ P'*"""^ 
BAYSIDE BOROUGH. Ucommisston to establish an 

Historic and Cultural District 



inforntation are available in 
the Department of Planning. 
BAYSIDE BOROUGH. 
15, Petitkm by motion of 



9. PetitkKi by motion of tfje 
Virginia Beach Planning 
Commission to establish an 
NialorlcwidCUrtural DIsh-ict 
on certain property 
as located at ttw 



on certain property 
described as beginning at a 
point 230 feet more or less 
North of Chicken Valley 
Road, rimning a distance of 



SANITARY LINEN 
SERVICE 

^J^W^Buf Wi Supply" 

2514 Hampton Blvd. 
( Corner 26th and Hampton Blvd. ) 
627-2624 



This Space PUd Fot By The WiUiamdiuig Pottery 

WHArS HAPPENING AT THE POnERY 

Shops Will Move Across The lUaroad Tracks But Not Merchandiae 
UGHTFOOT-Tliii 4>ri>i| •« •>* completii^ out moat sifnificaiit 
Aigic dwkkm since 1938, at wWch time we wrikad olT 34 paces 
akMW Rt 60 and 34 paces to die C A O RaOroad tracks, drove 4 
wooden stakes in the gfoand and paki Mi. Benson S 1 50 for the 
had and Bat Tetchy S 10 for writii^ the deed. Thus the WUbams- 
Iwig tottay was founded. 

Substituting labor fot capital we dug a well, bait a kiln, set up 
awnkaliop.aadtwBtaplacetoliverofSlOOa 

Last year wc decided lo expand to the other side oT the C a O 
Hacks aad move part of our operatioa Hki*. Price Tagf^ cool 
mBlioa. Anyway we enjoyed eveiy mfawte aloag the way. 

Now, here is wlial wil be happening this wintei. We will move 
some of our rfiops across the tracks, but we won't move the met- 
cfaandlse wewillsditdlonthisaideofike tracks by this methods. 

Aiau in two Aops wffl be roped off. Pikes on mcidiaiidiae^ 
aiase aieaa wU hit the skids on this schedule: 

Jaauaiy 20 to the 27th wM be 40% off. From January 27 to 
Pebniaiy 17 discount wW be SOK. Febnuiy 17 discount wfll be 
70K. March 3 to Macb 10 wM be 80», aad Moch 10 to Om 17 
diacount wB be 90*. ^ 

Th^B diicOQHtt WuT^fty U} t^Btttntioiim Low pnm, - — — - 

We hope lo bc|^ ofoitt acioas die backs Hie last of Feb- 
nay. In tlie ateMdme visit oar Skid Row soon and see what's 
iMppcnaaf to prices. Our new wiatn lidnis are 9-5:30-7 dqrs a 

iutiiiniiismG POiTEAy 

Ufbtfeot, Virciaia 23090 

5 MILES WEST OF WILLIAMSBURG. ROUTE 60 
SM-3371 



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CalimCOTVfcrSamtDay 

In Home Strwt On TV AnJ SUHSO 

Oft Bring Your Set To Out Store for Quick TEICO Sf«WCf 

NO CHARGE For Etlimatt on brmg m 

EACTORV AUTHORIZED ZENITH SERVICE 



SAVt $C00 



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COUKM 

ON ANY 

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•iutia^tidtmattt Sinta 1950 . . 




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li ELECTRONia CORP^, 
9654 First Vww StrMt Phont 513-1525 



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over 2 ■ yaar 



grounds of 
separation. 

And an affidavit having 
been made and filed that the 
defendant due diligence has 
been used by or In behalf of 
ttte complainant to ascertain 
in which county or cor- 
poratlon the defendant Is, 
't without effect, the last Known 
post office address being; 
Route 1, Box 7 Virginia 
Beach, Virginia. 

It Is ordered that he do 
appear her within ten (10) 
days after due publication 
hereOf, and do wt)at may be 
necessary to protect his 
interest in this suit. 

A copy-Teste: 

J. Curtis Fruit, Clerk. 

William H- Colona, Jr., p.q. 
281 Independence Blvd. 
Virginia Beach, Virginia 

1-9, 16, 23, 30-4T 

Commonwealth of Virginia, 
In the Clerk's Office of the 
Circuit Court of the City of 
Virginia Beach, on the 2nd 
day of January, 1974. 

Benjamin George Puleo, 

Plaintiff, 

against 

AHce Faye Puleo, Defendant. 

6roerof 
publication 

The object of this suit is to 
obtain a divorce a vinculo 
matrimonii from the said 
defendant, upon the grounds 
of desertion. 

And an affidavit" having 
been made and filed that the 
defendant is a non-resident of 
the State of Virginia, the last 
known post office address 
being: 3249 Orange Street, 
National City, California, 
92050. 

It is ordered that she do 
appear here within ten (10) 
days after due publication 
hereof, and do what may be 
necessary to protect her 
interest in this suit. 

A copy-Teste: 

J. Curtis Fruit, Clerk. 

Fine, Fine, Legum & Fine, 

pq. 

720 Law Building 
Norfolk, Virginia 

19, 16, 23, 30-4T 

VIRGINIA: 

IN THE CLERK'S OF- 
FICE OF THE CIRCUIT 
COURT OF THE CITY OF 
"; VIRGINIA BEACH, ON THE 
2ND DAY OF JAN., 1974. 

In rer Adoption of ELMO 
THOMAS HESSE, JR., 
an infant ynder the age of 
fourteen years 

Bv: Randolph Howard 
Foster and Juanita Hesse 
Foster, 

Petitioners 
To: Elmo Thomas Hesse Sr. 
AAaysville, West Virginia 

IN CHANCERY 
C-73;325-A 

ORDER 

This day came Randolph 
.Howard Foster and Juanita 
"fiesse Foster, Petitioners, 
and represented that the 
objectof this proceeding is to 
effect the adoption of the 
above named infant, Elmo 
Thomas, Hesser-JTrr by 
Randolph Howard Foster 
and Juanita Hesse Foster, 
husband and wife, and af- 
fidavit having been made 
and filed that Elmo Thomas 
Hesse, Sr., a natural parent 
of said child. Is a non- 
resident of the State of 
Virginia, the last known post 
office address being: 
Maysviile, West Virginia; 

It is therefore Ordered that 
the said Elmo Thomas 
Hesse, Sr. appear before this 
Court withing ten (10) days 
after publication of this 
Order and Indicate his at- 
titude toward the proposed 
adoption, or- otherwise do 
what is necessary to protect 
his interest in this matter. 

A copy teste: 

John V. Fentress, Clerk 

By: Sandra Hargrove, D.C. 

' Barry Kantor, p.q. 
706 Plaza One BIdg. 
Norfolk, Va. 

1-9,16, 23, 30-4T 



NOTICE 



Virginia: 



The regular meeting of 
the Council of the City of 
Virginia Beach will be held 
in the Council Chambers of 
the Adm inistration 
Building, City Hall, 
Pi^incess Anne Station, 
Virginia Beach, Virginia, 
on Monday, January 21, 
1974, at 2:00 P.M. at which 
time the following 
applications will be heard: 

CHANGE OF ZONING 
DISTRICT 
CLASSIFICATIONS: 

DEFERREDfOR 60 DAYS 
BY CITY COUNCIL ON 
NOVEMBER 19, 1973 AND 
REFERRED BACK TO 
PLANNING 
COMMISSION: 



ot Great Neck Road and the 
Norfolk and Southern 
Railroad Right of Way, 
running a distance of 328.02 ^ 
feet along the West side of| 
Great Neck Road, running! 
a distance of 760 feet along, 
the North side of the' 
NorfoMk and Southern 
Railroad Right of Way, 
running a distance of llOi 
feet along the Western 
property line and running a 
distance of 644.90 feet along 
the South side of the 
Virginia Beach-Norfolk 
Expressway and running a 
distance of 264.24 feet along 
the Northern property line. 
Said parcel contains 5.17 
acres. (London Bridge 
Area). Planning 
Commission recommends 
/nodification to B-2 
Community Business 
District. LYNN HAVEN 
BOROUGH. 

3. Petition of Donna 
Goocfson by J.H. Robertson 
for .a CHANGE OF 
ZON ING DISTRICT 
CLASSIFICATION from R- 
8 Residential District to 01 
Of IJice District on certain 
property beginning at a 
poiallSO feet South of Gator 
RoaoVf unning a distance of 
150 feet along the West side 
of South Lynnhaven Road, 
running a distance of 327 
feet alona the Southern 
property line of which 75.58 
feet is the North side of 
First Street and 251.42 feet 
is the South side of Virginia 
Beach-Norfolk Expressway 
Access 'Ramp, running a 
distance of 35.39 feet along 
the East side of A/torrison 
Avenue and running a 
distance of 300 feet along 
the Northern property line. 
Said parcel is known as 
Lots 4 and 5 and Part of 
Lots 6, 10 and 11, Block 4, 
Plan of Lynnhaven, and 
contains 0.75 acre more or 
less. (PInewood Gardens- 
Lynnhaven Areas). LYNN- 
HAVEN BOROUGH. 

4. Petition by Resolution 
of the Honorable Council, 
City of Virginia Beach, for a 
CHANGE OF ZON- 
ING DISTRICT CLAS.'i- 
IFICATION from A-. 
1 Apartment District to R-i 
Residential District on 
certain property located at 
the Northern terminius of 
North Plaza Trail and 
North of Kings Lake Drive, 
running a distance of 1768.2 
feet along the Eastern f 
property line, running a 
distance of 269.29'feet along 
the Northern property line 
(Branch of Lynnhaven 
River), running a distance 
of 872.27 feet along the 
Western property line 

(Kings Lake) and running a 
distance of 151 8 feet along the 
Southern property line 
(Kings Lake). Said parcel is. 
known as Kings Grant, Part 
2, Section Sand contains 30.75 
acres more or less. Plats 
with more detailed in- 
formation are available in 
the Office of the Planning 
Department. (Kings Grant 
Area). LYNNHAVEN 
BOROUGH. 

5. Petition of Cart N. 
AAoore for a change of zoning 
district classification from 
AG-1 Agricultural District 
with Historic and Cultural 
District Regulations to 0-1 
Office District with Historic 
and Cultural District. 
Regulations on certain 
property located at the 
Southeast corner of North 
Landing Road and West 
Neck Road running a 
distance of 690 feet along 
the East side of West Neck 
Road, running a distance of 
480 feet along the Northern 
property line of which 389 
feet Is the South side of 
North Landing Road, 
running a distance of 752,27 
feet along the Eastern 
property line. Said parcel is 
irregular in shape and^ 
contains 3.964 acres. 
(Princess Anne Municipal 
Center Area). PRINCESS 
ANNE BOROUGH. 

6. Petition of Holloman 
Brown Funeral Home for a 
CHANGE OF ZON 
ING DISTRICT CLASS- 
IFICATION from 
AG 1 Agricultural District 
to 0-1 Office District on 
certain property beginning 
at a point 2780 feet more or 
less South of the 
intersection of Landstown 
Road and Holland Road, 
running a distance of 467.02 
feet along, the Northe.rn 
property line of*nhi"ch 
102.56 feet is the SoutlM||(e , 
of Holland Road, running a 
distance of 674.78 feet along 
the Eastern property line, 
running a distance of 750 
feet along the Southern 
property line and running a 
distance of 861.07 feef along 
the Western property line\ 
Said parcel contains 7.82 
acres. Plats with more 
detailed information are 
available in the 

Department of *, City 
Planning. PRINCESS 
ANNE BOROUGH. 



CONDITIONAL 
PERMIT: 



USE written notice. 



7. Application of 
Holloman Brown Funeral 
Home for a CONDITIONAL 
USE PERMIT to operate a 
cemetery on certain 
property beginning at a 
point 3050 feet more or ttt» 
North of Prlnciss^Anne 
Road and running^ a 
distance of 3146.87 feet 
along the Western property 
line of which 178 feet is the 
East side of Landstown 
Road, running a distance of 
2718.57 feet along the 
Northern property line and 
running a distance of 
1166.56 feet along the 
Easfern property line of 
which 227.77 feet is the West 
side Of Holland Road, 
running a distance of 
3073.54 feet i^along the 
Southern property line. 
Said parcel contains 117.32 
acres. PRINCESS ANNE 
BOROUGH. 

Request a resolution by 
City Council upon 
recommendation of the 
Planning Department to 
change the street name of 
that portion now known as 
Bonney Rd. extending 
North of Princess Anne Rd. 
to the Intersection of South 
Witchduck Rd. and Bonney 
Rd. to South Witchduck Rd. 

Richard J. Webbon 
City Clerk 

1-9, 16,-2T 

"NOTICE TO THE 
PUBLIC" 



"VIRGINIA 
AND POWER 



ELECTRIC 
COMP'ANY" 



19, 14, 23, 30-4T 



Notice is hereby given to 
the public that Virginia 
Electric and Power Com- 
pany has applied to the State 
Corporation Commission for 
authority to amend Its 
Purchased GAS Adjustment 
Factor. Its present ad- 
justment factor provides for 
automatic Increases or 
decreases in charges to gas 
customers because of 
changes in wholesale costs of 
gas purchsed from pipelines. 
The present increases or 
decreases in the wholesale 
cost of pipeline gas passed on 
to the Company's customers 
through th* adjustment 
factor are changes that are 
approved by the Federal 
Power Commission which 
.has jurisdiction over the 
interstate sale of pipeline 
gas. Under the terms of the 
revised adjustment factor, 
the Company will be 
authorized to pass on to its 
customers, in addition to 
pipel ine cost changes the cost 
of supplemental sources of 
gas including, but not limi 
to, liquefied natural gas 
(LNG)r liquefied petroleum 
gas (LPG), and other 
hydrocarbons distributed to 
customers or used as feed- 
stock for substitute natural 
gas (SNG). The cost to the 
Company of the sup- 
plemental sources of gas will 
not be regulated. 

In Case No. 19173, after 
notice to the public and a 
public hearing, the Com- 
mission determined that all 
gas utilities should be 
authorized to seek and 
develop supplemental 
sources of gas because of the 
present gas shortage which 
prevails throughout the 
nation. The Commission 
.further determined that the 
gas utilities should be 
allowed to file revised ad- 
justment factors which in- 
clude the cost of sup- 
plemental sources of gas. 



Virginia EleQtric and 
Power Company has been 
authorized to place the 
revised adjustment factor 
into effect for gas service 
rendered on and after 
January 1, 1974. The revision 
is subject to further in- 
vestigation, upon motion ot 
the Commission, or upon 
motion of any interested 
party for good cause, if such 
objection is filed in writing 
with the Commission on or 
before February 4, 1974. 

The application and a copy 
of the. revised adjustment 
factor is available for review 
in all business offices of the 
Company where bills may be 
paid within the territory in 
which it provides gas 
serivdce and in the offices of 
the State Corporation 
Commission, Richomond, 
Virginia. Any interested 
member of the oubiic 
wishing to object to approval 
of the revised adjustment 
factor should Inform the 
Commission of such ob- 
jection, in writing, addressed 
to William C. Young, Clerk, 
State Corporation Com- 
mission, P.O. Box 1197, Rich- 
mond, Virginia 23209, and a 
copy should be sent to Guy T. 
Tripp, III, counsel for the 
Company, P.O. Box 1535, ' 
Richmond, Virginia 23212. 
Anyone wishing to be heard 
orally by the Commission 
should so indicate ^in the 



PR I N C ES S 
BOROUGH 



ANNE 



1. Petition of R.L. 
Munier and William W. 
Robertson for a CHANGE 
OF ZONING DISTRICT 
CLASSIFICATION from A 
1 Apartment District to 0-1 
Office District on certain 
property beginning at a 
point 1800 feet more or less 
West of South Lynnhaven 
Road, running a distance of 
543.20 feet along the North 
-^de of Holland Road, 
running a distance of 566.14 
feet along the Western 
property line, running a 
distance of 495.90feef along 
Wve Northvn property line 
%fid running a distance of 
71)0.50 feet along the 
Eastern property line. Said 
parcel contains 8 acres 
more or less. (Green Run 
Area). PRINCESS ANNE 
BOROUGH 

I YNNHAVEN BOAOUGH 

2 Petition of Carlton E. 
Seay and Laura R. Seay 
Trust for a CHANGE OF 
ZONI NG DISTRICT 
CLASSIFICATION from R 
„XR«»ldential District to A-2 
Apartment District on 
certain property located at 
the Norttiwest intersection 








J)IAL-486-S433 
or 486-3434 



VIRGINIA: IN THE 
(fLERK'S OFFICE OF 
THE CIRCUIT COyST OF 
THE CITY OF VIRGINIA 
BEACH, ON THE 26TH 
DAY OF DECEMBER, 1973 
In Chancery 
. No. 16476- B 

In re: Adoption of Lorl 

Lynn Collins 

By: Hal Max Kanoy and 

Jean Audrey Kanoy, 

Petitioners 

To: Philip M. Collins 

234 Benn's Road 

Newport News, Virginia 



ORDER 

This day came Hal Max 
Kanoy and Jean Audrey 
Kanoy, Petitioners, and 
represented that the object 
of this proceeding is to 
effect the adoption of the 
above named infant(s), 
Lori^ U|rfW*tgjnns by -Hal 
Max Kanoy and "Jean 
Audrey Kanoy, husband- 
and wife, and affidavit 
having been made and filed 
that Philip M. Collins, a 
natural parent of said 
child, the last Rnown post 
office address being: 234 
Benn's Road, Newport 
News, Virginia. 

It is therefore Ordered 
that the said Philip M. 
Collins appear before this 
Court within ten (10) days 
after publication of this 
Order and indicate his-her" 
attitude toward the 
proposed adoption, or 
otherwise do what is 
necessary to protect his 
interest in this matter. 

John V. Fentress, Clerk 
By: Sandra Hargorve D.C. 

William C. Bunch, Jr. 

Bunch and Swanner 

Attorneys At Law 

4565 Virginia Beach 

Boulevard 

Virginia Beach, Virginia, 

23462 

1-2, 9, 16, 23-4T 

Commonwealth of Virginia, 
In the Clerk's Office of 
the Circuit Court of the City 
of Virginia Beach, on the 
26th day of December, 1973. 
Harold M. Quigley, 
Plaintiff, 
against 

Elizabeth C. Quigley, 
Defendant. 

ORDER OF 
PUBLICATIOJS.:_„__ 

The object of this suit is 
for the said plaintiff to 
obtain a divorce a mensa et 
thoro on the grounds of 
desertion to be later 
merged into a divorce a 
vinculo matrimonii from 
thesaid defendant, upon the 
grounds of desertion. 

And an affidavit having 
been made and filed that 
the defendant is not a 
resident of the State of 
Virginia, the last known 
post office address beini^: 
28 Quissett Harbor Road, 
Falmouth, Massachusetts. 



RATES: "Person to 
Person" ads for in" 
Idividuals buying, selling, 
renting; or offering a 
service. Up to 12 words, 
only SI. per issue, add SO 
cents for each additional 4 
words. 

Classitied display USl \ 
per colurtin inch, with a 
minimum charge of $5.04 
except on contract basis. 
Business Rates: First it 
words in straight 
classified are $2.00 Lower 
rates may be earned. 

DEADLINE for 
I Classified display is Noon 
- Monday prior to Wed- 
nesday publication. In 
column classifieds ac- 
cepted until 5 p.m. ' 
Monday prior to Wed- 
nesday publication. 

Place ads at the SUN 
office 138 S. Rosemont 
Rd., Va. Beach, Va. 23452, 
or mail to Classified 
Desk ; or phone 481 3433 or 
486-3434. Classifieds are 
priced on cash basis; 
payment is due upon 
receipt of statement. 



Th« Sun— Wednesday, Januiry 16, 1974— Pago B-7 




1 1 Autranobflet Poi Sale 



11 AutomobflMPwHie 



VERNON— Missed you. 
Tiger. 

STEVE— Welcome to the Sun 
Staff-get them Ads! Golden 
Greek. 

BOB-WELCOME To the Sun/ 
You're good at getting them 
adsi 

TiMMYNext time we'll play 
on the other machine, maybe 
then I'll have a better 
chancel Dee. 

RAY-Looking forward to 
dancing with you Friday 
night; Your favorite 
Advertising Account 
Executive. 



BUICK - 1973 Station 
Wagon, excellent condition. 
Low mileage. All extras. 
Good gas mile. $4950. 428 
0453. 



LINCOLN — CON- 

TINENTAL 1970 Mark III. 
Blue with white vinyl top, 
white leather Interior, loaded 
with aH the extras, new 
radial tires. In A^t condition. 
Very clean. 38,000 miles. 
Selling to settle estate. 
Owner, 427-1787 after 6 pm 
weekdays, anytime week 
days. 



MERCEDES BENZ - 1967, 
250SE. Excellent condition. 
340 6605 or 425 0766. 



PONTIAC GTO — 1973. 
Being relocated. Sacrifice 
price. Dave or Sharon, 480- 
2249. 



it is ordered that she do 
appear here within 10 (ten) 
days after due publication 
hereof, and do what may be 
necessary to protect her 
interest in this suit. 



DICK-I'm going 
woods again soon. 



thru the 
Diane. 



IRENE-Prayer will be an- 
swered for those who wait 
upon the Lord. 2nd Daughter 



JOHN 


V 


FENTRESS, 


CLERK 








Phyllis 


N. 


Styron, 


Deputy 


Clerk. 









CHICKEN-I'll try for 
weekendl T.H.T.H.T. 



this 



t^r. Osie H. Gay, Jr., Atty. 
2871 River Road, 
Virginia Beach, Virginia 
1-2,9,16,23-41 



Commonwealth of Virginia, 
in the Cierk'soHlceof the 
Circuit Court of the City of 
Virginia Beach, on the 26th 
day of December, 1973. 
John David LIndly, 
Plaintiff, 

against ' 

Debora B. Lindly, 
Defendant. 

ORDEROF 
PUBLICATlCnr 

The object of this suit is 
for the said plaintiff to 
obtain a divorce A Mensa 
Et Thoro to be later merged 
into a Divorce A Vinculo 
Matrimonii from the said 
defendant, upon the 
grounds of desertion. 

And an affidavit having 
been made and filed that 
the defendant is not a 
••esident of the State of 
Virginia, the last known 
post office address being: 
3926 N. Keeler Avenue, 
Chicago, Illinois. 

It is ordered that she do 
appear here within 10 (ten) 
days after due publication 



3 Special Notices 



AUTO JUNK 

Towed Away Free 
Call 855-4372 



BLOOD DONORS 

NEEDED 

Earn immediate cash. $40 to 

$60 a month. Blood plasma 

urgently needed. 

NORFOLK 
PLASMA CORP 

733 Granby St. 



623-3173 



BUICK - 1967 Blectra, 4 
door hardtop. SfOOO miles. 
A 1 cond. 857-4434. 



BUICK — 1968 Le Sabre, 2 
door hardtop, power bi*akes 
8i steering. Exc. cond. 4 
new tires. Air conditioning. 
3404607. 



CAPRi-'71, 4 speed. 
Immaculate inside and out. 
$1,595. 

DAVIS CORNER (MOTORS 
497 8100 Va. Lie. 3211 



CHEVROLET — 1972 
Impala Custom, fully 
equipped, excellent 
condition. Assume balance. 
4893973. 



CHEVROLET — 1970 
Malibu, 4 dr. hardtop, fully 
equipped. One owner. 464 
6180. 

CHEVROLET - 1965 
Impala SS, convt., 1-owner. 
Good cond. $400. 583 0455 
aft. 5 p.m. 



RENAULT 

Th» n»llon'$ larg«t^j«tectlon of 
used Ren«u*»s trom'th* n»tlon'i 
largtst Renault „dt«ltr. All 
modalj, colon and"prlc»$. Most 
are one owner cars with our 
(amous one year warranty. 

EASTERN AUTO 

933 E LITTLE CHEEK RD. SIS 

m, 



7IV.W. Bus.clean MWi 

'73Javelln, A C 189$ 
•71 Waooneer, AC 

4w>ie«ldrive 349S 
■n Hornet, AC 

sharp ' J195 

'M Cougar, AC I39S 
'M Eord Station Wagon 

6 cylinder a9S 
'49 Ambauador Coupe 

Clean 1395 
'71 Chevelle, Hardtop, 

Coupe, AC ia9S 

'71 Subaru, )3,000 miles 1195 

'69AMX,4spd ,clean I39S 

'69 Datsun Wagon 1J95 

'73 Jeepster, A C, 4 wh, dr. 

10,000 miles 3495 

MALBON . 
MOTOR CO. 

413 Virginia Beach Blvd 

• Phone 438 4961 
Ask for Howard OeVall 



VOLKSWAGEN - 1971 van, 
equipped for camping, stereo 
tape player, call 425-7793 
nights. 

12 Tnicks, Tnilen, Jeeps 



FORD PICKUP, '59, F-lOO, 
V 8 automatic. Special $388. 
DAVISCORNER MOTORS 
497 8100 Va. Lie. 3211 



■RECREATIQNAll 



DODGE - 1967 RT. 
Excellent conditibn. $450 or 
take over payments. 425- 
1991. 



CANDY THE CLOWN 
Birthdays, Promotionals, 
Grand Openings. 587-3697. 

SEWING — done in my 
home, alterations. Children 
or adults. Ffne work, 486- 
7610. 



FORD — J9ZQ LTD Station 
Wagon. Take over 
/^payments of $73 a month. 
Call 484-9317. 

FORD — 1971 Mustang 
Grande. Automatic, air 
conditioned, power steering 
and brakes. Excellent cond. 
Call 499-9482 after 5 p.m. 



Reduce 


safe 8. fast with 


GoBese 


Tablets 8, E-Vap 


"water 


pills" Murden 


Drug. 





FORD - 
Wagon, 9 
8553768. 



1967 Station 
passenger. $700. 



E-2's And Up 

Also Non Military 
Minimum Age 18 

CALL 583-3808 
We Finance Ask For Ribs 
71 Torino Coupe $129$ 
TOSuperbird $1S9S 
70 Nova Coupe $1495 
70 MuiUng 3 tpd. ;$1395 
70 Chevelle SS Coupe 

$1550 

69 Cunuo 4 spd. $1395 
69 Torino 3 ipd. $S9S 
68GT0 4>pd. $995 
68 Roid Runner 4 ipd. 

$995 

67 CimafO-327 $995 
67 Impala SS $595 
67CaUlint4dr. $$95 

RIBS AUTO SALES 
3625 MlUUiy Hwy. 



18 Campers, Trailer. 



LAYTON ^ 1963, 13' Sleeps 3, 
ice box, stove, sink, water 
and electrical connections. 
See It and make a reasonable 
offer, 427-3273. 



■ EMPLOYMENT^ 



21 Boats, Marine Sui 



ippUM 



AUTHORIZEDDEALER 

,_ Of 

T-Craft Boats 

Jack Thorton 

Mobile Homes 

8552510 



THE PEMBROKE POP- 
PETS — Are now available 
for Birthday Parties, Special 
Events, etc. Children and 
Adult entertainment. 497- 
4141, 497-0982. 



FORD — 1966 Galaxie 2 
door hardtop, ,?ir, power 
steering. Excellent cond. 
Extra cleih. 340-4607. 

FORD — Galaxie 1965, 
automatic, excellent 



hereof, and do what may be *J*2l_r_!:'!^_i__ running condition. $400. 484 



necessary to protect 
interest in this suit. 



her 



4457. 




S Lost k Found 



JOHN 


V. FENTRESS, 


CLERK 




Phyllis 


N. Styron, Deputy 


Clerk 




Mr. George F. Darden, Jr., 


Atty. 




30530th 


Street, 


Virginia 


Beach, Virginia 




1-2,9,16,23 41 



Found— A large black male 
coca poo. Bay Colony area. 
Phone 428-5705. 

8 Monuments-Burial Lots 

2 choice cemetery lots, $10.00 
down, $12.00 month. Call 497- 
8571. 



OLDS— 1972 Cutlass 
Supreme, air, automatic, 
AM'FM radio and tape, low 
mileage, excellent 
condition. $3,150. 499-2670. 

LINCOLN- 
CONTINENTAL — 1973,^ 
door sedan, new condition. 
17,000 miles. Quick sale. 
$5,200. 460 0892. 



HELLO THEREU 

I'M BACK AT RK NOW! 

RAY TIDROW 

"NEW AND USED CARS AND TRUCKS" 

iT'sRK CHEVROLET NOW 

2661 VIRGINIA BEACH BLVD. 
VIRGINIA BEACH, VA. 
PHONE 486-2222 



QUICK dHECK 
CLASSIFIED INDEX 



ANNOUNCEMENTS 



MERCHANDISE 



SunihliieAdt i 

Personal Notice* 2 

Special Services 3 

Transportation 4 

Lost&Found 5 

Cardof Thanks « 

In Memorlam 7 

MonuinentS'Burlal Lots ( 



I AUTOMOTIVE I 

Automobiles for Sale 11 

Trucks, Trailers, Jeeps 12 

Wanted Automotive 12A 

Autos, Trucks for hire 13 

Auto Parts, Repairs 14 

Auto Access. Painting 14A 

Utility Trailers 15 

Buses 15A 

Wanted Trailers 1SB 

AAotorcycles, Scooters 14 

Aircraft for sale, parts 17 



I RECREATIONAL \ 

Campers, Trailers II 

Rec. Vehicles for hire ISA 

Camp, Sports Equip 19 

Beach Supplies 20 

Boats, Marine Supplies 21 

BoatsforHIre ...' J1A 



Articles for Sale 51 

Antiques 51 A 

Household Goods , .52 

Garage-Rummage 52A 

Wanted to Buy 53 

Swap Trade 53A 

Musical Merchandise 54 

TVRadlo Stereo .,55 

Electronic EqutpmenI 55A 

Coins and Stamps 5* 

Jewelry t. Watches .'57 

Wearing Apparel 57A 

Good Things to Eat 54 

Farm and Dairy Products SBA 

Firewood 59 

Lawn and Garden M 

Seeds Plants Flowers MA 

Feed and Fertilizer 61 

Farm Implements 61 A 

Machinery and Tools 62 

Bui iding Materials 6] 

Business Equipment 64 



I MOBILE HOMESI 

AAobllettomes for Sale 65 

Atoblle Homes for Rent 65A 

Mobile Home Movers 65B 

Mobile Home Sites 66 

Mobile Homes Wanted 66A 



ROOMS-HOTELS 



EMPLOYMENT 



Rooms with Board 67 

Rooms without Board .>. 6t 

Rooms for Housekeeping 69 

Resorts Hotels 70 

Restaurants 71 

Wanted' Rooms or Board 72 



Help Wanted Female- 32 

Help Wanted Atole 33 

HelpWantedMP 34 

Resurne*, Listings 35 m 

JobsWanted 36 I 



REAL ESTATE FOR RENT 



I FINANCUtj 

Business Opportunities .... 31 

Wanted to Buy Business 31A 

Stocks and Bonds 39"" 

Loans-Mortgages 40 

Wanted to Borrow ! ... .41 

I INSTRUCTION \ 



correspondence course 42 

Local Instruction Classes 43 

General Instructions 43A 

Music-Oance-Dramatlcs 44 

Private Instructions .45 

Instructioni Wanted 46 



IreTs-uvESToacI 

Dogs, Cats.Other Piefs 47 

Petstud Service .^..'. 47A 

tMrsei. Cattle, Etc 41 

Poultry a Supplies 49 

WantwJLlvesiock 49A 



DIRECTORIES^ 



MOMfCMVICI-KBPAlB OUIDB 

UlHM I 



ApartmentS'Furnlshad 73 

Apartments, Unfurnished 74 

Garages for Rent 75 

Farms and Land for Rent 76 

Movers Storage 76A 

Houses for Rent 77 

Furnished Houses 77A 

Resort Property for Rent 71 

Suburban for Rent 71A 

Out of Town for Rent 7IB 

Wanted to Rent 79 

For Rent or Sale n 

Ground Leases na 

Business Places for Rent 11 

Offices and Desk Space 11A 

Industrial for Rent db 



I REAL ESTATE FOR SALE | 

Industrial for Sale ItC 

Busineis Property-Sale W 

Investment Property i2A 

Apartments for Sale KB 

Farms Land Timber M 

Real Estate Notices S4 

For Sale Norfolk » 

For Sale Virginia Beach ... »6~ 

For Sale Chesapeake 17 

For S*e Portsmouth M 

COfMtomlnlums 

Suburban for Sale 90 

Resort Property for Sale 91 

OOTn.; T,iwn tor Sale . -, 92 

LotsferSale n 

Exchange Real Estate .94 

For Sale or Exchange 95 

. JlfaitnLRNi Eitati 

New Homes for Sale 97 



^UKS « "PmsON TO PtIISON" AD 

IN ANY OP mi ABOW CLASSIFICATIONS 

IUNB>-«iStUtt-«4. 

DIAL 4M-Maer Mi-MM 





LARGE INVENTORY OF 1974's IN STOCK 
BEFORE PRICE INCREASE 

SAVE HUNDREDSIil 



YOUR TRADC DOBS NOT 
HAVE^tO Bi PAID 
fOR TO BUYII 



tfAV^Att 
MAKES & MODEL! 
CARS I TRUCKS 
CALL MR. McCOY 




FINANCE MEN 
ON THE PREMISES 
IMMEDIATE ON 
THE SPOT DELIV. 
ERY UP TO 42 
MOS. TO PAY 



2661 VIRGINIA BEACH BLVD. 
OPEN NIGHT.S PHONE 486 2222 



BIG nVH 

SELECTION 

OF NEW 

TRUCKS 



^^^^MM*^^^^^^^'^^'^'^^^ 



„M^»..u.miiiM.i..>i^^iP"g 



m^mm 



/ 



Pag* B-S-TDeSun-Wadnosday, January 16, 1974 




Am Clo/Hfied 486-S4SS 

486-1414 



PERSON to PERSON ADS! 



33 Ifalp Waited Male 



TEXAS OIL COMPANY 
Wii opening in Virginia 
Beach, Va. area. No 
experience necessary. Age 
not important. Good 
character a must. We train. 
Air mail, A. L. DIclcerson, 
Pres., Southwestern 
Petroleum Corp., Fort 
Worth, Texas 76101. 

BOYS CLUB DIRECTOR, 
Virginia Beach. National 
Youth Serving Agency, 
S9S0O plus full fringe 
benefits, 3 weeks vacation, 
degree plus 3 to 5 years 
related experience. Mail 
confidential resume to P.O. 
Box 11101, Norfolk, 
Virginia. ?3517. 

34 Halp Wantad M-P 

AMBITIOUS PERSONS 
WHO WANT TO EARN 
BUT CAN ONLY WORK 
PART-TIME. Opportunity 
to earn $3. or more per 
hour. Training given. Call 
for appointment only, 497- 
2234. 

Large Corporation 
expanding. Need 2 positive 
thinking manor women. We 
prepare you to earn $125 
weekly or better, 1f 
qualified. Call Mr. Bailey, 
499 4606 weekdays, 8:30 to 
10:00 A.M. 



34He»Waiitedli^' 



43 Loed ImtiuctkHi Claiiw ' U Coins and, «taiW|w 



NEEDED 

8 People for fast growing 
business. You must 
qualify. 

499-0876 

BY APPOINTMENT 

ONLY 



36 Jobs Wairtad 



BABYSIJTING— In my 
home, fiice yard. Hilltop 
Manor. 425-8832. 

BABYSITTING— My home. 
Princess Anne Plaza Area. 
340-8936. 

BABYSITTING — P. A. 
Plaza, in my home for 
working mothers. 
Weekdays, 486-1056. 

BABYSITTING — London 
Bridge area. For working 
mothers. Experienced. 486- 
7843. 

NURSES AIDE— desires 
private duty, 3 p.m.*to 11 
p.m. or 11 p.m. to 7 a.m. 
Own transportation. 853- 
6435. 

RESPONSIBLE Middle 
aged lady will care for your 
home and pets while you 
are away. 486-3469. 



WANTED: FULL 
TIME REAL ESTATE 
SALESPEOPLE 

Better than 50 per cent 
split, no pressure. Good 
opportunity for the right 
people. , 

R.E. Smith Real Estate, 
phone 486-1177; nights 340- 
7388. 



TYPING — in my home, 
experienced secretary; 
reasonable. 420-9584. 



38 



Opportaal^ 



BUSINESS OPPORTUNITY- 
Can make $500 a month part- 
time. Call 340-1317 for ap- 
pointment. No information 
on phone. 



HitfT 



Opportuaitiei 



SpltTRItUTOIK NfEOfO 'VUlt. tUTI at FULL TIME -NO IHrfRIENCf NCCfUARV 

B AUTO-HOME ACCESSORIES ft CARE PRODUCTS 

Sk Mm> imliMini irown tmmtt mm « »o«Mn la 4istriku» mulll|inilhM t f^f^^ 



ttMnimi pivtuttt ol • nutoc U.S. cwiwwila in iha (InMi kUVon S Aum/Hwm 
IMd. RMtwli M, company Mcwf* icnvan iMtkhP wHk Mfk *r«lii. 



nxni 

HOLLYWOOD ACCESSORIES 



WAX 



PREMIUM TOOLS 



OVER I DO NAME BRAND PRODUCTS SUCH AS: 

K2r. JANITOR IN A DRUM, FANTASTIK. SPRAY ft WASH. SUPER IRAVO. 
PLIDOtrT imi H E. 0» tOt.-RAtt»-WAX, MASTER WAX. ZEREX. VISTA. 
J/WAX S MANY OTHERS. 

IK mxoi imnMn u wm mi n lu i m i«i cwin 
M wniii Humci Mcow siun Munumri 
m ranm ui KCMimti 

amiBM CAM MnSTMIT tlUS. »M10, MTM tr TO MTSe 
rpptirinl thwW kiw cv, mtimum a< 1 ipai* iMtira wMkly, raKaWl H>* tVfikto 
u •WMM kuwMM rw p oi u ltililio <»il)iM 30 imit. II yw mm »mm rnnl w ii mi li. 
Iim tiw (Mh imwlinam mt llnMnlv Mm U Mrn yovt ouni I m iii m . HlM arHf 



n prpd u ctt 

SB Wlfi imp 

km 



INTEINATIONAL MAIIETING SYSTEMS INC. 

uno/MW *n„ un. m ••» aw-ussn MtHnui m. • n. losn, asiON 



34 Hdp Waited M-P 



WHAT ARE YOU WOlttH? 



Its up to you. 



Ambitious men or women. None too dd. 
Will train in all phases of our business. 
Salary while training. Many benefits. 
Hospitalization and Major Medical. $1,000 
per month draw plus bonus. Apply Imme- 
diately. 



6914 N. Military Highway, Norfolk. 
Apply in person after 10:00 A.M. 



PRISONER? 

Are You Chained to a Desk 
or Machine 40 Hours Every 
Week?" 

Do Bells. Whistles and 
Supervisors Control 
Everything You Do? 

Does Your Work Lack 
Opportunity and Challenge? 

The Only Difference Between 

A Rut and a Grave is the 
length I 

Want to Get Out off that Rut? 
What a Chance to Develop 
Your Real Taleifts and Abilities 

STOP BEING A PRISONERI 

CALL 340-1317 

for an appointment 




or 



e 



MONTESSORI 

MUSIC 
WORKSHOP 




NextMetchMullna, e«rtltlM 
MofittMorl tMchif. ChlM in 
construction of tilmMlf Ihreugh 
craatlvt ulf cxprtsslon. B«lc 
conctptt, btglnnino piano - 
FORTE Foundation *n-M» ■ 
a»an. 



43A Oanaral InttrwctiORs 



VOICE LESSONS 
Boglnntrs, advanced. James 
Atorrlaaon, 428-0i»7. 

45 Mtrate Instnicttom 

PIANO LESSONS — BA In 
music. Pocahontas Village 
near Pembroke. 497-2035. 




tr Dots, Cats, OttMT Pah 



GOLDEN RETRIEVER- 
Dark, male, 18 months old, 
answers to "George". Lost in 
South Lynnhaven rd. area. 
Reward. 427-3943. 

GREAT DANES — AKC, 
$150 and up. 1st shot. 
Wormed. 588-0358. 

GREAT DANE - AKC 
registered, black, terms. 
4288578 

HAAASTERS— 2 females 
with cage, very tame. $5. 
Call AArs. Parker, 486-3430, 
days. 

LABRADOR RETRIEVE'! 
— AAale, 1V^ years old. Good 
with children, lumps In 
truck. FREE to good home. 
Call 484-9317. 

PEKINGESE - AKC, 1 
male, 1 female. Reasonably 
priced. 499-5176. 




SI Articlas for Sale 

APPLIANCES 

INVENTORY 

CLEARANCE SALE 

West TV Appliances, 

38 Southern Shopping 

Center, 583-SM>6. 

FOUR pachlnko games. $25. 
apiece, $100 for all. 340-9022. 

INSULATION — Vh" full 
thick. 4.29 roll. Arco Hard- 
ware, 3365 AAilitary hwy. 853- 
1379. 

51A AntiqiMS 

CLOCKS— AntK^e Clocks, 
Grandfather and mantel. 499: 
1310. 



S2 HoinalieM Ooods 

BEDROOM SUITE-5 piece 
Spanish, 1 yr. old. S200. 
428.9073. 

DINING ROOM SUITE— 
Mahogany, table, 6 chairs, 
corner cabinet. Very good 
condition. Call 340-5659. 

LIVING ROOM SUITE— 
Modern, - 7 pieces, $400. 
Excellent OMiditkin. 428-0973. 

LIVING ROOM SUITE — 
Green and Gold Color 
Scheme, modern decor, 
OMCh, chair, coffee table, 
end table, lamp, and 2 sets of 
full length drapes. $300 or 
best offer. 425-5180. 

TABLE — Drop leaf dining 
Duncan Phyfe. 428- 



9179. 



^. 



d WaiMaiteBvy 



ELECTRIC TRAINS — 
Lionel, Pfyw", •ny condition. 
Cash paM. fi7-«256. 

PorNible TV's, record 
players, radios, toy trains. 
545-6242. For the Glory of 
the Lord! 

WE NEED BADLY 
Cash paid for canwras, tape 
racocdcrs, stereos, TV's, 
Band Instruments, 
Typewriters, guns. 
LITTAAAN'S 

anatyMaiTav. m4im 



ORGAN — Oreo* Contort, 
•Nee new. S1». 4»-X}19. 

PIANO — Sleinway, upright. 
$800. 4284734. 



BinriNp 

SILVER COINS 

BEFORE 1964 

PAYING 95% 

SobjecttoCSianfB 

NOR VIEW COIN SHOP 

■ 6212 SomUi Point Rd. 

Phone S53-81 18 



BUYING 
SILVEaCOINS 

BEFi 

HIGHES' 

., -nan 

"Blscountonall 
Supplies with this Ad 
6212SewellsPt. Rd. 

Phone 853-8118 



M MoMIe Homes Sale 

72 Capella • 12' x 65' with 
expansion, fully carpeted, 
drapes. Has to be moved. 
Assume balance. 
Must Sell. 499-3401 

OLYMPIC-12X65, J 
bedrooms, furnished. Only 4 
mos. old. Owner being trans- 
ferred. Take over payments. 
425-1991. 

PACEAAAKER-58'x10', 3 
bedrooiri; central air cond. 






<7A Wealing Alltel 

MINK COAT — Blonde, 
maxi, size 10-12. Cost $1,250, 
sell $625. New. 340-9135. 

59Pfaeiw>od 

FIREWOOD-Plck-up load, 
delivered and stacked. All 
hardwood. 481-4321, 425-7867. 



LOTS OF LOTS 

We have vacant lots immediately 
avallablt for eacti of our 
cuitomars In eitticr Virginia 
Beach or Ctiesapeake. Forget 
problems, don't drive many miles 
ea^h day. come buy from us, come 
live with 

DELTONA 

MOBILE HOME SALES 

Ttta Daalmr With Local Lots 

NORFOLK LOT, >S3 4584 

Chesapeake lot, 4t7'UM 

CLOSED SUNDAY 



66 A Mobtte Homes Wanted 



- 62 MacMney And Tools 



LATHE— 18"x60", very good 
condition. $775. 855-0428. 



m 



63 BulMlim Materials 

HOME Builders 8. Con 
tractors - Let us help you 
with that new home, ad- 
ditions or Irepairs. We can 
furnish fnaterials from 
basement to attic and aid you 
in financing. Phone 
KELLA/^ S. EATON 427-3200. 



64 Bi^lwss Bqulpment 



DICTATING MACHINES — 
one set of hivo. "Dict-A- 
phone". Excellent condition. 
464-9395, 428 9179. 

RENT OR BUY — new & 
used office furniture. Ex- 
rental desks $49 8i up. New 
damaged files $39 Si up. Free 
delivery. 

DESKS, INC. 
3411 High St. 397-7883 



e 



TOP CASH 

PAID FOR USED 
MOBILE HOMES 



Call Jack 

at 

8552510 

Va. License 0599 > 



n Houses lor Rant 

ARROWHEAD — 3 
bedroom brick, 2 baths, air 
conditioned. Couple. $200. 
497-7655. 

PRINCESS ANNE PLAZA; 

Newly painted, 3 bedrooms, 2 

bath ranch, with den and 

jarage on fenced lot. Fully 

carpeted. 486-3800 or 481 6429. 

REAL ESTATE CORP. 

OF VIRGINIA 

"For the People" 

VIRGINIA BEACH- 
QUICK OCCUPANCY 
3, 4 and 5 bedroom homes In 
Thalia, Arrowhead, Malibu, 
Green Run and Windsor 
Woods. Call 340-9722. 
BISSETT REALTY 

78 Resort Property-Rant 

HdUSESSit 

-APARTMENtS 

Available on a yearly or 

short term basis, s 

DUCKS REAL ESTATE 

323Laskinrd. 

428-4882 

81 A Offlces^Desk Space 

PRIME OFFICE SPACE — 
New space available in 
modern, SUN building at 138 
S. Rosemont Rd. next to 
Expressway. Large and 
small unit for several office 
use, ready for you. Call 486- 



86 FoiSrieViiglnis Beach 86 Foi Sale \%gtola Beach 86 Foe Sale Viqlnia Beach 



—CAPE HENRY SHORES- 

LARGE'AND LOVELY 
Completely carpeted 5 
bedroom ranch on deep 
water bulkheaded lot. Huge 
beamed ceiling den has 
raised hearth fireplace. 
Screened porch opens from 
eat-in kitchen, separate 
utility room, 2 door garage. 
Owner will finance. 486- 
3800, 481-6429, 481-6866. 
REALESTATECORP. 
OFVIRGINIA 
"FOR THE PEOPLE" 



GREEN RUN-Carefree 
living in this 3 bedroom end 
unit townhouse. Excellent 
condition. Call Jim Sands, 
486-1533. We h-ade. Higglns 
Realty, Inc., 486-4041. 



GREEN RUN-3 bedroom 
brick townhouse with central 
air. Pay equity and assume. 
Owner will help finance 
equity. Call Joe Robinson, 
464-4839. We h-ade. Higgins 
Realty, Inc., 486-4041. 

GREEN RUN— Owner h-ans- 
f erred, will hate to leave our 
lovely all electric 4 bedroom 
ranch In excellent neigh- 
borhood. Call 427-5643. 

GOING, GOING, GONEI — 
Sell your home fast with a 
Sun Classified AdI Call 486- 
3433. 



POINTO' WOODS - By owner. 
3 bedroom, assume 7 per cent 
loan. 425-7563. 

PEMBROKE MANOR-Large 
5 bedroom Colonial, T/t bath, 
waterfront, garage, family 
room. 481-5298. 

POINT O' WOODS-Lovely 3 
bedroom air conditioned, 
brick >Anch, loaded with 
vi.\rsi, ^300. no agents, 
340-8642. 



WOLFSNARE ROAD 
5 Bedroom Brick Ranch, 
Formal Dining Room, 3 
Baths, Den, and Fireplace. 
All appliances, carpeting 
and Drapes. 428-3822. 

litaot <A\dUx JftaLttj 



SOUTHERN POINTS — $57,W0 

SPREAD OUT 

in this large 5 bedroom, 3 bath 
ranch with large lot, big garden 
with room for more. Many extras. 
Jim Meyer G.R.I., 499-7«1l, nights 

""'©ESTES 

MEMBER REALTORS MLS 



WOLFSNARE ACRES- 
Large 5 bedroom brick 
ranch, 3 iMths, family room, 
fireplace, eat in kitchen, 2 
car garage, central air 
conditioning, by owner. 428- 
4279. . 

WINDSOR OAKS WEST- 
CAPTIVATING describes 
this distinguished 3 bedroom 
brick ranch. Untwilevable 
bedroom and family room 
sizes. Call Ellie Talanian, 
340-1690. We h-ade. Higglns 
Realty, Inc., 486-4041. 



WOLFSNARE 
PLANT.A*rt'oN - 3 
bedroom brick ranch, 2 
baths, central air 
conditioning, fireplace, 
large lot. Any type 
financing. VA appraised at 
$36,000. Owner helps pay 
buyer's closing costs. 
Quick occupancy. Call 
Fred Soles, 340-8311, 481- 
5357. 



m 



5rSde Norfolk 



73 Apartments-Purnlshttf 



VIRGINIA BEACH 

Mime, rat«. > room •fllclencv,' 
weekly and monthly rates; color TV.I 
basic aellng end cooking utensils, all 

utlilties. 

VIRGINIAN 

MOTOR APTS. 

310 24th St. 

428-5333 



LENOX — Price S26,S00 

5 MINUTES TO GATE 4 

3 bedrooms, 7 baths. Mr. Allen 499- 
74)1; nights 4970408; mobile «25- 
7773. 

® ESTES 

MEMBER REALTORS MLS 





-SOUTHERN POINTS 

Large 3 bedroom 

Brick Ranch, 

Low equity 

and assume. 

Call Jim Stanley. 

486-1423 486-1131 

PEOPLE'S REALTY 



WELLINGTON WOODS 

All electric, 3 Bedroom, 2 
Bath, Ranch. Den, 
Fjreplace, Formal Dining 
Room, and Carpeting. 7 per 
cent Loan. Make an Offer. 
428-3822. 

2W£ JUiUix JitaLltj 



87 For Sale Chawipenlce 

GEORGETOWN COLONY - 
Large 3 bedroom brick 
luxury home. Owner will 
help finance. Call Joe 
Robinson, 462-4839. We 
trade. Higgins Realty, Inc., 
486-4041. 

HOLLY COVE-3 bedroom 
brick townhouse with central 
air. Pay $3,975 equity and 
assume. Owner will help 
finance equity. Call Joe 
Robinson, 464-4839. We trade. 
Higgins Realty, Inc., 486- 
4041. 



96 Wanted Realfy Estate 

CASH TALKS 

We buy 8i sell. Need Homes. 
Call 464-6205. Crowgey 
Realty. 



65 Mobile Homes Srie 



74 Apartmente (Jnliiniidied 

CptONY PINES APTS. 

2 and 3 bedroom apts. in 
exclusive adult complex. 
$180 and $220 monthly. Call 
4867363 



84 For Sale VirglniaBMCh 

ARROWHEAD-Have a party 
in yourt'400 square foot family 
room I 4 bedrooms, 2 baths. 
Will sell VA. Call Ronnie 
Fowler, 486-1369. We trade. 
Higgins Realty, Inc., 486- 
4041. 



BEAT THE 
FUEL SHORTAGE 

BUY AN ALL 
ELECTRIC 
MOBILE HOME 

WEHAVELOf^ 

FOR ALL 

ELECTRIC COACHES 

AVAILABLE NOW 

DELTONA 

MOBILE HOME SALES 
NORFOLK LOT .....853-4584 
CHESAPEAKE LOT487-8866 



ALL 1973 

MODELS REDUCED 

TOMAKEJOOMFOR 

1974 MODELS 

1974, 12' wide Aigo- 
For Only $4,895 

A* / 

ANCHOR 

TrallorSalBs 

6838 N. Mtttaiy Hwy. 
F<x infoimation cal 
collect 804-85»4S54 
Va Uceue 1862 



76 A Moyei»5tonge 



CAROLANNE FARMS »32,900 

OPEN HOUSE 

Sunday 1 to 4 p.m. 5371 
Susquehanna Drive. You must see 
this air conditioned, 3 bedroom 
ranch with fireplace. Marie 
Haie'hater 499 7611; 4«4 1713. 

® ESTES 

MEMBER REALTORS MLS 



FURNITURE MOVING — 
Refrigerators, Washers, 
Dryers, Stoves, etc. We 
move anything! 7 days a 
week — 24 hours a day. No 
extra charge. 499-3985. 



CHeSOPEtAN COLONY— 
Under construction, pick 
colors and cabinets, 4 
bedroom, 2 baths brick 
ranch; attached garage, 
fireplace, on water. $70,000. 
340-2107. 



TIDEWATER GUTTERING CO. 

HOME OF 

SEAMLESS ALUMINUM GlilTERS 




duF Mobile 
Faefory Will 
Handle Any 
Lingth 



No Rusting No Painting 

Maintenance Free 



CALL 486-5586 FOR FREE ESTIMATE 

SKCIAl PRiaS FOR CONTRAaORS 




HOW 
MUCH 
DO YOUR 
UTILITIES 
COST 

PAY' 
ONE 
BILL 
AT t 
REGENCY 

ALL irnUTIES 
INCLUDED! 
SEE OUR FURNISHED 
MODEL 

Regency 

atHIUTOP 

1,2,8(3 bedroom 
Apartn^ents, 
Towntiouses, 
Garden and Bachelor, 

LASKINROADAT 
HILLTOP 
PH0NE;428-<8I3 




NEED 



f T7 HELP?^^^ 



\^ 



\ 



^}J \ I Want to buy, sell or rent a 
^ -' home or apartment? We 
can help you And your 
heart's desirea, Give us a call today for quick 

""I"' MU34043U 

2». J/-W /?«/fy 

Ganarai Rial Ettata 
1 16 London Bridge Shopping Center^ 
Virginia Beach. Va. 




vi> 



SELLING...RENTING...BUYII|iG...TRADING 

Youll Do Bettor With. 

BISSEn REALTY, INC. 

"A Respected Name In Real Estate" 

Thalia Shopping Center 
4316 Virginia Beach Blvd. 
Virginia Beach, Va. 23452 

Mike Vance, GRI 340-7000 Lowell Powers, 420-38(» 
Jack Bissett, GRI 340-5626 Lee O'Btien 340-4034 
Rose Bissett, GRI 340-9898 Ron Gregory 497-9535 

OFFICE 340-9721 



Harry Kohlberg, the great Reat Estate 
Magician has pulled another great 
sales achievement out of the hat! 



If you want your 
propoty sold, call 
Harry today, Multi- 
Million Dollar Sales 
for 10 straight years. 



CAU HARRY AT 4ftf-2317 or nifhti 482-11t1 

630 N. WHchdwck Road Virginia Bwch, Va. 23462 




^ma«iw«imi 



mm^K 



^BSFVi 



HiHt^NSUME 




an insulation 
trick to avoid 



B^ Peter Weaver 



Q. In your cdumn xm buying insulation, you neglected 
to mention insulation contractors, m some cases it's: 
difficult or impossible for a home owner to install his 
own insulation, even though it costs considerably less. 
How does one go about getting a contractor to do the 
job?-5.M., Kansas City, Mo. 

A. det contractor's names from local buildo-s 
(whose names you can get from your savings in- 
stitutions). Call several and do some comparison 
shopiiing. Beware of prices that are considerably lower 
than the pack. There are ways of "fluffing up" in- 
sulation that'^ blown in to make it look like you're 
getting the required amount. 
. Yoilr attic is the main place to insulate. The govern- 
ment recommends a total of six inches insulation in 
attics with an R value (resistance to heat loss) of 19. If 
you already have two inches of insulation in your attic 
(most homes do), then you'll need approximately four 
more with an R value of 12 to 13. 

The contract must include the number of bags or 
bales of insulation to be used, the R value of the in- 
sulation and the number of square feet to be covered. 
The (»ntractor must certify that this inforn^ation is 
correct by signing and dating the contract. 

It's not too late to insulate. There's still some winter 
left and insulation also helps cut your airconditioning 
bill in summer. 



Mind ^ui^ Money 



Q. What about these "convenience checks" some 
banks are offering? They're supposed to b6 free but I 
don't believe anything is free any more. — A.M., 
Chicago, ni. •c 

A. These "convenience" checks are offered to bank 
customers who already have one of the national or 
regional bank credit cards such as BankAmericard or 
Master Charge. They're to be used in stores that do not 
accent bank credit cards. 

There's a catch. The minute your check is cashed, 
you Start paying interest on the face amount until you 
get your pext bank credit card bill. If you pay your bill 
on time^ the interest charge would be small. But, it's 
still inta«st. 

Your best bet is to use your credit card where it's 
accepted and only use the "convenience"- checks in an 
emergency. Again, unless it's an emergency, never let 
your credit card bill slide past the due date. If you 
always pay your bill on time, you'll get the convenience 
of the card without ever having to pay for it. 

Q. How does one go about getting a cash discount if 
you don't use your credit card? I heard stores and 
restaurants charge five pefcJBWor more on bills that *'' 
are paid by credit cards. —"Mrs. F.N.A., Alexandria 
Va. 



A. It's true, the credit card companies charge a 
discount rate to outlets that honor their cards. It's a 
service charge. Some stores (especially sm^fller ones) 
and some restaurants will give a discount if you start to 
pay the bill with your credit card and then ask if you 
can get a discount for cash. If you can't get a discount, 
it's foolish to pay cash. First, you're paying for the 
convenience system, so you might as well use it. 
Second, you get a little more protection in case the 
product or service you bought is faulty (you can qan try 
to hold up payment) and third you get the use of a 
product or service for several weeks without paying for 
it (until you pay your credit card bill). 

King Features Syndicate, Inc., 1974. 



Rent beautiful 
n6w furniture 




-mXh purchase option 

Oin Uige diow-nxMn feitutes 200 combinations of 
quality humtiure that you can lease with the option 
to pOichaM. Rent indhridual items or complete 
groups at low monthly rates. We also of fei office^ 
fumituie, TVs, ban and a complete accessoiy 
boutique — a one^tep furniture center. Free local 
deliveiy on 12 mondi leases. 

FURNITURE RENTAL 




METROIJE/^E 



4995 Cleveland St., Virginia Beach, Va. 
. Phone (804T 499-9888 




Rd. brtwwn VIhIbH tmeh Bind. * tli> tpnamif. 



♦=4- 



Remodeling? 

Whatever You Need/ 
We'll Do It Riglitl 

Add a porch, panel a room or 
install new picture wlndowi? 
You can count on us for a job 
well done. We're ExpertsI 

Bonded and inuired ^ 
FOR HOME IMPROVEMENTS 

OF ALL TYPES 

EAGLENUT CONSTRUCTION CO. 



m mm 



CALL 

486-7527 




Virginia Beacn Real Jzistate 
Uliiere The LiYin^ 1/ Loyeli| 

Financ^/Business/Economy ' 



The Sun— Wednesday, 
(January 16, 1974— Page B-5 



SmitH to head Hilltop bank ^ 



Lawrence F. (Nick) 
Smitir^ manage the new 
HiUtop branch of United 
Virginia — Banlt-Seaboard 



National, which will 
celet)rate itt grand opening 
today, Thursday and 
Friday. 



People's promotions 



Crammed buses, cut flights 
help trains made comeback 



With restricted autoniobile driving, with airlines 
cutting flights and with many bus lines crammed to 
capacity, the train is making a comeback. 

According to Amtrak (national rail line) Vice- 
president Edwin Edel, "on some routes we've handled 
more passengo-s than any other time since World War 

11." 
Unlike the inter-city bus Imes, Amtrak offers 

reservation service through 6,000 travd ag«its and 430^ 

Amtrak stations around the country. Starting next' 

month, travellers can phone in for reservations on toll 

free numbers. A national computer system can give 

the traveller a quick yes or no answer for the specitk 

reservation dates and routes. 

Amtrak is a national train system which criss- 
crosses the country from Boston to Los Angeles and 
from Miami to Seattle. For most trains, the most ef- 
ficioit speed is around 70 miles per hour, and there are 
no speed limits (other than traditional limits for 
safety). Amtrak's East Coast Metroliner from 
Washington to New York goes up to 120 miles per hour. 

Faster, more frequent service is planned for such 
intermediate travel corridors as Chicago-Minneapolis 
and Los Angeles-San Francisco. 

Amtrak will accept most national credit cards in 
payment for tickets and has its own Rail Travel Card 
which is also good for charging food and drink on the 
trains. 

A must for your expanding transportation file is 
Amtrak's excellent "National Schedules" booklet. It 
gives a route map for all trains, schedule information, 
sample fares between points and a complete list of toll- 
free information and reservation numbws.The booklet 
als6 contains a section entitled: "Traveling by Train... 
Things You Should Know." It explains baggage 
checking and spates the policy on pets, among other 
things. 

To get a free copy of Amtrak's "National Schedules" 
booklet, send a self-addressed, stamped, business-size 
envelope to: Amtrak; Box K.F.; 955 L'Enfant Plaza; 
Washington D.C. 20024. 

When you get on Amtrak trains, the service is pretty 
goo). On a few trains it's excelloit. One problem, 
however, is the terminal situation in some cities. Sonne 
terminals are located in isolated, old sections of town. 
In some cases it's difficult to get taxis or local buses. 



CONGRATULATIONS TO NO. 1! 

B.R. "BEV" ALLEN! 




© 



TOP SALESMAN FOR 1973 

ESTES 

IrEALTY CORP. 



® 



Suite 206 Beacon BIdg. 
4565 Va. Beach Blvd. 

4997611: 

Member KeaRon MLS "'^^'O* 



IB 




KiiiiimB 

EVERYTHING FQR YOUR HOM^ 



FREE ESTIMATES 

• Kitchens • Family Rooms 
•Bedrooms • Convert 

Gorages 

ALL WORK 
INSWiD 



545-4613 



A. 



Added q>ace to your home means Bdde<} vahie to 
yourhcnne. Make your home more comfortable and 
cQjnanlent by addh^ a room...Don't Wait..CALL NOJf 



FREE 



UMHEXANDIKniBREIKHiELDiG ■._,,. .--.i 
m WlLSm ROAD, CHESAKAKE S4S-46 13 1 EST1MAI& 

35 Yemt^Qmmmlty Sein^ 




•wMMl 




GOT 
PROBLEMS? 

trylflg to fix up 
your home? 
Want to 
increase its re-sale 

value? Want to buy, sell, or rent a 
new home or apartment? Then "Cliff" 

Clifton is your man! For all your 
maintenance problems, and also all your 

real estate and insurance needs, 

call now- 

490-23 T 5 

CLARATON AIAL fSTATf 

a INSURANCf AOffMCr, CORP. 

ALSO 

CLIFF'S RfPAIRS, INC. 

JO0LA M. MrjrCffOIKK RD. 



Serlea 

This li the flnat article of a three-part series in M^ieh 
cauumer columnist Peter Weaver teUs how to cope with the 
en^gy shortage and the resulting transportation problems. 



Itepefully, as the transportation mess forces more 
travellers away from planes and cars, tenninals will 
be built to accommodate trains, buses, local transit 
and even airline limousines. New Orleans and Chicago 
now have terminals with combined train and inter-city 
bus service. One is in the planning stage for 
Washington, D.C. 

Tlie "Auto-Train," which is not a part of the Amtrak 
system, carries passaigers with their cars from a 
Virginia terminal near Washington to Sanford, Florida 
(near Disney World). In June, the company will open 
another auto-trahi to Florida from Louisville, Ken- 
tucky. 

^ 6ne-way, auto-train far«% are $190 which covers the 
car, two passengers and includes meals and en- 
tertainment en route. 

King Features Syndicate, Inc., 1974. 



Peo|de's Bank of 
ViFginto Beadi has an- 
nounced several 
promotions, 

Gregory A. Williams, 
currently 4n charge of 
comnwTCikl loans for the 
bank, has been appointed 
to the office of assistant 
vice-presidoit. 

F. Judson Hill, who 
joined the bank in May, has 



to 



been promoted 
marketing officer. 

Also, James A. Pen- 
nington has been promoted 
to . adjustment officer, 
Robert L: Evans to loan 
officer, Joan A, Spier III to 
auditor and Robert E. 
* Turner to loan officer. 



The branch bank had 
been oj^rating in tem- 
poNry Quarters at Laskin 
and First Colonial Roads 
and will move into its new 
3,^004<|Uare-foot building 
on, the same site this week. 

Mr. Smith joined United 
Vii-ginia in 1972 and was 
appointed to official status 
in January, 1973. Prior to 
managing the new Hilltop 
office, he was assistant 
manager of the bank's 
main office in Norfolk. 



PLANNING TO SELL 
YOUR HOME? 
IMtlCE IT RIGHT! 



Call U for the professional 
seivloe you tie looking foi. 

JOHNM. 
WRiOHT 

REALTY. INC. 

1964 LASKIN RO. 
VA.BEACK. VA. 
425-8702 

' Members of Realtors MLS 



One Word Describes Our 
EFFEaiVENESS: 




Blfiiini-HaHiWN-rjirlHi 



REALTOR 



4«20 Hoygood ltd 

4M-9334 

99« Firil Coboiol Rd 

4II'450« 



1301 f . lilllt CrMk Rd 

513.0101 

l7MCr.alN.dlRd 

411.0952 





^^t 







»<**.<<<>■ ^»»* 

^i!^::<i 



PfMMU 









maxk tf" 







i^^frJ^I 



Old ^^qatioi}^ 

GARDEN APARTMENTS 

New and Lovely In Park-Like Surroundings 
1 & 2 BEDROOMS NOW LEASING 



Beautiful spacious rooms, fully 

carpeted, with ample cloiets 

big eat-in-kitchens with outside windows 

large storage area in each apartment 

individual entrances 

front door parking 

close to shopping 

Off Independence Blvd. on Honey Grove Rd. 
Across from Haygood Shopping Ctntet iQ 
Beautiful Old Donation Manor 



GALi46(H)921 



WeYebuilding 

atradlrion 

in Green Run. 

A family tradition 




i» 



IxcflisiVc Sehi 



WOODLAND ESTATES 



'<Wl<^ 




LARASAN ... of cours* 
427-6161 or 486-7969 



lob IrtniMH ~ 
SALI5 A$50CIATI 



HOME SERVICE 



R GUIDE 





USE THIS HANDY UP TO DATE AiPHABETICAUY USTEP 
GUIDE FOR AU YOUR SERVICE NEEDSI 

Painttns 




Additions-Remocteling Electrical Contractor Home Improvements 



Tile 






ADDITIONS— 
REMODELING" 
Free Estimates 
Home repairs of all types. 

Bonded and Insured 

EAGLENUT 
CONSTRUCTION CO. 

486-7527 



EUCrRKAL WIORK 

Electrtc hnt and dryers; 
houaes rewired. 
Free Eatinnte* 
Call Mike LeviMky 



Om-fi Maintenance 

■id Repair Ca 

Roofing, gutttrhig, carpan- 
try ind Inlnor rtpalrt. W* 
fix 111 thoM hard to find 
iMk*. PrM EfilmatM. 
OWNER, W.J. Ollvwiui 

587-8638 



Asphalt-Concrete 



ASPHALT PAVING 

pKchlbiep«cUa|,diiM- 

MyssMMWty.Nojot) 

toommL' 



487-eMl 




ELECTRICAL 
COI>rrRACTOR 
Reridaatfal 
CoodBsecM 



D.E. MITCHEki 
426-7262 



PAINTING 
Take advantage of the 
season! Save money on 
the cost ot painting your 
home, do it now! Call 
American Home 
Painting Co. 499 W4« 
Free Estimates 
AM Work Guaranteed 



YOU CAN'T 
BEAT MY PRICES! 

On any Bathroom or Kitchen 
tile work. Also Acoustical 
ceilings. 

Call 587 1720 



Home Improvements 



H0M6 IMPROVEMENTS 

Lumber and buHding materisls, 
room additions, slorm doors and 
windows, wall to wall carpet; 
vinyl siding Free estimates, 
terms. 

|^LLAMAEATW<,INC 
427-3200 



ASPHALT 

and 

CONCRETE 

PAVING 

ASPHALT ROADS 

MATERIALS CO.. INC. 

498S Holland Rd.- 

Virginia Beach 

Phone 497-3591 



BlcydeR^a^r» 



/.tfiin tfrtui f Siniif 
Bicycle Rrpairik WcUiiq; 
hhI Ornamental Iron Rifl- 
ing < 
VA BEACH LAWN 
MOWER & WELDING 



jz&sQza. 



CarpMitry 




WOOD FENCE 
CONTRACTOR 




SPLIT RAIL 



Rails in iQfi 
cliestnMt will 
Installed 



all 



spruce, and 
locust post. 



Hardwood, ^ru<», 
Chestnirt 



2 RAIL 

3 RAIL 

4 RAIL 



1.24 
1.44 
1.79 



1.29 
l.» 
1.96 



1.64 
2.00 

2.as 



Priced per fool Prica (nciudn 
malarMs and inslaltaliai Prtce 

ia». t»«., , 



FREE ESTIMATES 

BUYRNIN6IIV00D 

FARMS 

427a«15 427-iaO 



PAINTING 

INTERIOR 4 EXTERIOR 

Low Rates - Experienced 

FREE ESTIMATES 

423-4891 



Upholstery 



Interior Decorating 



UPHOLtTleV 
ANDERSON'S OPMOI,ST««Y 

If your lurnitura It sick. ...bring 
it to Anderson's U|M<olsfary for a 
face litting. All work first class. 

Call 464-4€37 



Catering 



INTERIOR-EXTERIOR 

SPECIALIST 

Guaranteed workmanship 

Special Rates for 

Senior Citizens 

FREE ESTIMATES 
497 30 18 or 583 5648 



PLASTERING 8. 
STUCCO 

John L. Brown 

Rt 1, Box 1033 

Princess Anne Rd. 

Virginia Beach 

427 «51, 



UPHOLSTERY 
ALL Types, Fast Service, 
Reasonable prices. 

"Serving Tidewater 
fonover 35 years " 

BENDER'SCUSTOM 

SERVICE 

627 0246 



Lodtsniths 



Roofirtg 



At'^K^Siiop 



231«Vs. 



Mf4. 



J.lLlkHt 
34e-3490 



and 
GUTTERING 
SPECIALISTS 

Senior CItiiens 
Special Rate 
S»3 5648 or 497 3018 
after! pm 



Ten 40,000 

Peiyle Aboyt 

iftwfSB^r 

To place your id in 
this directory call 

Mrs. Ann Parker ^ 
486•343^-^ 



f^jfli §40— Th« Sun— Wednesday, January 16, 1974 



"5 \'^ 



^\ 



8a4€ 

A mistake 
could cost 
a man's life 



S^Jid U/Us^ 



Parachute riggers at Naval Air Station (NAS) 
Oceana, after completion of their training, pass one 
of the most exacting final examinations ever 
devised — using a parachute they have packed to 
float to earth after jumping from a plane in flight. 

Petty Officer First Class Gerald R. Fick is one of 
those who proved the quality of his work by this 
test. Mr. Fick, 32, a veteran of 13 years of parachute 
rigging, now has the responsibility of inspectir^ 
parachutes for proper packing at NAS. 

"Sometimes a. parachute is the last chance a 
man's got when his plane goes down, and you get a 
goodTeehng Khowirig^you can save a man's life," 
says Mr. Fick. 

"I'VE NEVER had any doubt," he added, "that 
any chute we pack will work. If my siq)eriors came 
in right now and said, 'Would you take that chute 
you've just packed and go out and use it', I would. 

A major portion of work at the NAS "rigging l<rft" 
is devoted to inspection of all parachutes at r^ular 
intervals to insure they are in good condition. 
Chutes are opened and checked for holes vc rips in 
canopies, frayed linesor defects in the packs before 
being repacked. If a parachute has gotten wet, it 
must be dried thoroughly before it is repacked. Mr. 
Fick says, "Because of the altitudes the chutes are 
taken to in modem aircraft, they would freeze if not 
entirely dry and possibly malfunction if used." 
Repacking a chute is just as demanding as its in- 
spection. Canopies and lines must be arranged in 
definite patterns and properly secured in\their 
packs to assure (^ning if the chute has to be used. 



A VARIETY OF parachutes are used at NAS 
today. TTiese range from a "badc-pack" type, 
which are secured to a man by harness and opened 
by manually pulling a "rip cord", to more 
so{^iscated types which are attached to seats in the 
aircraft and open automatically on ejection from 
the aircraft. These latter-type chutes include one 
• equipped with a unit similar to a hand grenade 
which fires as the chute leaves the pack, spreading 
lines to cause the diute to open completely. Mr. 
Fick points out that automatic chutes are equipped 
with a "rip cord" should any unit of the chute fail 
^nd it is necessary to open it manually. 

Mr. Fick explained the advantage of using multi- 
colored chutes. "If a man went down, the chute 
could be used to provide better visibility fw search 
teams." He also panted out parachutes can be used 
as tents to provide shelter if a flier goes down on 
land, or as covers over rafts for protection from the 
sun if a man goes down at sea. ^ 

Complete records of inspections are kept for 
every parachute at NAS Oceana. This includes date 
of issuance, where assigned, dates of inspection, 
. recording of work performed on each chute, along 
with a coded number identifying the last inspector 
who approved the parachute for use. 

Mr. Fick commented that the thing parachute 
riggers dread the most is a report of srane 
disGcepancy in the operation of a chute on which he 
assisted in repacking. - 



NOTICE TO THE PUBLIC 



Notice is hereby given to the public that Virginia Electric 
and Power Company has applied to the State Corporation 
Commission for authority to amend its Pruchased GAS 
Adjustment Factor. Its present adjustment factor provides 
for automatic increases or decreases in charges to gas 
customers because of changes in wholesale costs of gas 
purchased from pipelines. The present increases or 
decreases in the wholesale cost of pipeline gas passed on to 
the Company's customers through the adjustment factor are 
changes that are approved by the Federal Power Com- 
mission which has jurisdiction ««j{.er the interstate sale of 
pipeline gas. Under the^ terms of the revised adjustment 
factor, the Company will be authorized to pass on to its 
customers, in addition to pipeline cost changes, the cost of 
supplemental sources of gas, including, but not limited to, 
liquefied natural gas (LNG), liquefied petroleum gas (LPG), 
and other hydrocarbons distributed to customers or used as 
feedstock for substitute natural gas (SNG). The a)8t to the 
Company of the siipplemental sources of gas will not be 
regulated. 

In Case No. 19173, after notice to the public and a public 
hearing, the Commission determined that all gas utilities 
should be authorized to seek and develop supplemental 
sources of gas because of the present gas shortage which 
prevails throughout the nation. The Commission further 
determined that the gas utilities should be allowed to file 

^t ■ revised adjustment factors which include the co&i <rf sup- 

%{ I plemental sources of gas. 

Virginia Electric and Power Company has been authorized 
to place the revised adjustment factor into efl(ect for gas 
service rendered on and after January 1, 1974. The revision is 
subject to further investigation, upon motion of the Com- 
mission, or upon motion of any interested party for good 
cause, if such objection is filed in writing with the Com- 
mission on or before February 4, 1974. 

The application and a copy of the revised adjustment 
factor is available for review in all business officeg^ of the 
Company where bills may be paid within the. territory in 
which it provides gas service and in the offices of the State 
Corporation Commission, Richmond, Virginia. Any in- 
terested member of the public wishing to (Aject to approval 
of the revised adjustmait factor ^ould inform the Com- 
miskin of such objection, in writing, addressed to William C. 
Yoing, Clerk, aate Corporation Commission, P.O. Box 1107, 
Richmond, Virginia 23a», and a copy should be sent to Guy 
T. Tripp, in, counsel for the Company, P.O. Box 1535, Wch 
mond, Virginia 23212. Anyone wishing to be heard orally by 
the Commission should so indicate in the written notice. 



'VIRGINIA ELECTRIC AND POWER COMPANY' 

Robl.S.Gay 

Rates k. Contracts 

Vepco 

7Uj * Franklin Sts. 

Rk^flMMid 21214 



r— 

A gull enjoys 

the serenity of 

a solo flight 



To a seagull, there'si 
probably no greater 
pleasure than soaring 
through (he blue sky 
searching for edible tidbits 
b?low. The silence of the 
bird's solitary flight 
probably draws glances of 
envy from the land-bound 
humant below who will 
never know how It feels to 
be free to fly alone. (Sun 
photo by Rod Mann) 




STOCK 



■ \ 
96SMI 

960175 



S9I741 



621311 
961(26 



NO. 




CORE S B/^RQAIN 



VUif our Bargain Corral wW» you'll find o liMU bit of loh of fhingtl Som» itmni an itrotchtd or ctanfwJ, torn* hovt pjirts 
fflitsing, many art th« r«»o)t of modeli that hov* bacn diicontinued or or« morkod down to got rid of dn ovoiritock. Ono 
tiling you ton b« luro of i> great buys! Our Borgoin Corral merchondiw ii pritod way down for foit removal from our 
jtock— M> peJM bround in our corral when you visit A*oor»'s ... Got your bonds a littlo dirty and lovo o lot of your hord- 
•orntd cash! 



THESE ITEMS CHESAPEAKE STORE ONLY! 



ITiM MC. SAU 

MH Mnne«MT0i IT im 429.W i«T>T9 

MAtvuT ooiB NVT sun MSOClOCAO 

WASNH M00-UI7I J7f.V9 IV9<VU 

sjrarrT. ums i2«.«5 

SSySfsir* 3rt.fs 295.40 

ssa.*?&ar 325^249.00 

jsyrf'^.T!'. 54.S0 35.00 

f:±Sir.T". iM.t5 299.95 

MWWASMaHMM Wf.fS 229.95 

ss-a^rr: :j. 20f.»5i79.95 

••MMIJMVNm •>■ I 00 

TMUuet •••W *.»W 

•Mm MHKAn* 

]-a«-4" WMOOWt 



20 OAl. CAMAW 
CANCOVMS 

tuxi wwn 

CAST ttOM SINK 

14000 nu AH 

CONOmONR MSKI4IS1 

ASSOenO OM MN MOWHNO 
SHOtTS Tout CHOKI 

ASSemO MM-NN MOMBMO} 
SHOtTS TOUl CHOtd ......... 



704262 
704304 
927004 



AattATMMMtl 

2S pc. tAiw OM mm . 



■MUUTW CASiMWT 



tiTOAtAOi 

oeois Asn 



•iTGAtAOl 
DOOtS 



ASIS yi.W 

42" eOUNTM «A At 

TOM w/cuTour I«.ta 

%>4/iMANisAaoaepiK..... KMS, 



«4AmaM4ii *.9t 

MWU-OMT 12.99 

sTmuvAratr <• •■ 

l*.1« AVOCAW I l.f 9 

ttii*iuil 11.99 

STML UVATOIY t, < I At 

i«>i*«ets T .4 11.99 



20x17 CHtUUVATOtT.... 

CMAI SNAM SYSTIM 

^AMl H» k MDOI . . . 

CKAI iHAKI SmiM 

IMM1..4' 
Sim STMAOI SMD 
*»r HA.47.N 



t3.t5 



. IMS 



30% OFF 



CLOSE-OUT 

Of Ml MnOiNAT 
CAimnS IN STOCK 



Drastic Cut On Our 
Better Interior P»ht 
Was $6.49 Gallon 

99 



WHILE 

STOCKS 

LAST 



2 



gillon 



LIMITED 

QUANTITIES 

FIRST 

COME 

BEST 

SELECTION 



THESE ITEMS AT VA. BEACH STORE ONLY! 

769273 TRADITIONAt COL BUTTERNUT PANEUNG 3/16"-4'x8' 8.49 6.50 

769257 TRADITIONAt COL WHITE ElM PANELIN6 3/16"x4"x8' 8.49 6.50 

TRASH & LAWN BAG 26 GAL SIZE /^T lYa 

021436 HEAVY DUTY HYDRAULIC DOOR CLOSE SK-550 4.29 3.89 

021568 ALUMINUM PUSH BAR ^^ ■* f' *•'' 

603357 CI TUB BEIGE R.H. DISPLAY MODEL • 98-95 50.00 

603241 CI TUB AVOCADO DISPLAY MODEL 98.95 M.OO 



. JUST 

SAY 
CHAKCE 

IT! 



Wow - Wtist a perfect time to redecor«t« it this super-low nl* 
, price on Evans Premium line interior latex wall paints! Select 
from 7 fastiionable pastel colors plus White. Evans Premium 
covers nearly jny previously, painted or properly prepared sur- 
face with a uniform, matte finish/and cleans up in a whistit 
with soap and water. Buy now and save on every gallon! 



V-N 





Cut Your Own Fire^oo<r 
WKh The Mini-Mac 1 



each 



THi! juper l.qhiweighi (only 6 9 Ibi.. Itsi cutting •ItKhmtnti), «uo«r 
powerful Mini Mac 1 Cham Saw cuts throujh • 6" log in jutt tivt MC- 
onili - Payi tor itself m the savir^gs on cutting your own firewood. 



Mini-Mac Electric 
Chain Sawi .... 



.00 




5 Light Wooden 
Wagon Wheel 
Chandelier 

Regular 
51.36 



88 



30" aumeter c»>enaali« i» 
nuiM of real wootf witn coooer 
trim ana frostaa fliass cnimneys. 
Ideal for informal living 
areas. 




retnperad Gla» 

)oor For Your ShoMWr 



»"5 64" 



20%5 



H»mmered wletv 9lt« pttwrn 
I fhovwr doof provKtei tronsluctnt 
I pnv»cv. i(pp»soJ"*> out' Sturdy 
I anodtzed f*om«W" (r»ming. 




1H" ABS or PVC Pipe 
10 Foot Lengths 

Reg. 
2.921 

Pintle ilrain, waste ft vent pipe 
from Moore's is your economical 
answer to tiorrw plumbing prob- 
lemsl Ligt^tweigf^t. corrosion 
proof, adaplabte^o other mater- 
iaii. I 





922021 



Royal Chef 
1/3 H.P. Waste 
Disposers 

Regularly 29.95! 



each 

Continuous feed - rugged, service- 
free 1/3 HP disposer features fi«ed 
impellers, permanently lubricated 
end ball bearing ft thrust bearing. 
Insulated at sink ft drain outlets 
with neoprene cushion for auiet 
operation. Jiffy sink mount with 
sink stopper and waste elbow. 



Price Reductions 
On Batliroom Vanities 



A. Regularly 50.69! 

24" white enameled metal vanity 
includes top. bowl & surface fit- 
' tings. White Glitter plasticlam. 
inate top. 626408 

B. Regularly 70.69! 

?4" Mediterrafi«§n-iivl« vanity 
festures plastic IsminatB surUce, 
(ndudei>03. bowl and surface 
fittingi. 626507 

C. Regularly 111. 89! 

Vour choice of Provincial or. Med- 
iterranean jtylmg - Includes cul- 
tured marble integral top & bowl, 
ptus chiome & lucite surface fit* 
ttngs 626606 



46 

61 
98 



25 



each 



99 



each 



00 



each 




Double Bowl 
Suinless Steel Sink 



Reg. 
25.75! 



■■fla each 



33"» 2Z" satin finish steinleM 
steel sink is lightweight and self- 
nmnhd for fast and easy I man 
installation without careful fil- 
ling. Itiaskei strainers antral 



Stainleit Steel 
Bedcet Strainer 



Shtnv MiiniMS tNaTbiiliM nrainer 
kMpe food pfrtwlM (rocn letting 

into ond clogging your kitchen 
plumbing fits olf ilomiord 3W" 4"*- 
SM^ openingi- 





Fire-Glo Logi Provide 
Hours Of Cheer And 
Warmth 



Our Low 
Price! 



• LodForOniy 

17S 



C^M burning Fire-Gte logs ignila 
Mstty ond Itov^ tiHl« osh Ivri OS 
memy a% yov Mt wf* Fira-G^ logs 
ort non'OBtC, non-J'otntftg, won t 
Bl»h, dart »(Ht O' spl«««r— |tf«* 
ehtr & WDrm^ m your firaploco! 



Use Your tiank Charge Card. 
Your Satisfaction 
Guarantaed or 
Money RafumM' 





OORE'S 



om^ 



Supermarket Of Lumtier ^ 



and 



eCHESAPEAKE 3224 A^mtic av. . oVIRGlNliV^BEAC 



Building Materials 



Phon* 543.3561- OPEN Mo«. & ^-'^'^Sff^^ f Tpm 

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Jriitfre The 
AeiUn Ul 

SunClmifiefli 

For ftfion to Hnaa Se^ 

vk^CAU.48«4433. 

M6-S4S4. 



This week's 
circulation 18,^0 

49th Year Noi 4 




City Of Virginia Beach, Va, 




\ . 



ceo chief 
profiled 



pfjcfo/i page 12 



Wednesday, JvHiary 23, 1974 



-^ 



r Copyright 1974 ' 
■MCh PublliMng Corp. 



J[££SUL 



City puts 60-day halt on housing growth 



By LINDA MILLER 
Sun Staff Writer 

Despite cries from meiAbers df the real estate 
profession lliat a shut-down on city construction 
could seriously hurt those persons in the housing 
industry, the Virginia Beach City Council 
Monday approved a DMay moratorium on all 
residential building applications by a vote of 6 to 

3 

Tbe proposal for the mot-atorium, made by 
Councitanan Robert Callis, drew almost as many 
qiiestions from the council as it did from the 
public. A motion to defer the proposal for two 
we^s from Councilman Dr. Clarence Holland 
was defeated, with support for the deferral 
coming only from Mayor Robert Cromwell and 
Councilman D. Murray Malbon. Dr. Holland told 
the crowd in the chamber he had "just seen the 
proposal today, (Monday) and I'm. not in a. 
position to vote on it yet." (Councilman Curtis 
Payne and Councilman George Ferrell were 
absent from Monday's meeting.) 

The debate on the moratorium lasted for three 
hours, with passage coming after Councilman 
Callis' insistoice that the city could no longer 



"tolerate unplanned and unmanaged growth." 
He urged, "if we don't take a step today, we may 
never take it. I don't see anything here that will 
stop the economy of the city. TTiere ar^ 7,000 
building permits out and enough land zoned 
already that no one is going to be hurl." 

1 AREA REPRESENTATIVES of the real 
estate profession did not agree that the 
moratorium would have no effect on the housing 
industry and asked the council to postpone the 
moratorium until further consideration could be 
given to the possible effects, lliose opposing the 
moratorium said no effective plan could be 
developed inM days, and they indicated they did 
not believe the council would end the con- 
struction shut-down after the 6(Niay period. They 
pointed to past moratoriums which did not end 
when Ihey were scheduled to. 

Lawrence^. Sancilio, president of Larasan 
Realty Corp. and president of the Virginia Beach 
Chamber of Ci)mmerce, asked the council to 
reconsider the effects of a housing halt. Calling 
the moratorium proposal "abrupt," he 
suggested that before the council take such 
action a special study committee be appointed, 



including area real estate representatives, to 
"produce some clear and rational answers to the 
question of directing devebfnnait in Virginia 
Beach." He asked Uie council not to treat 
members (rf the building industry as "enemies," 
but rather to cooperate with area real estate 
leaders "who could offer expert and rattonal 
advice on how our future growth and develop- 
ment might be intelligently managed." 

ALSO SPEAKING against the moratorium 
were Herbert Kramer, president of the 
Tidewater Builders' Assn.; Jack Robertson, 
ciiairman of the legislative committee of the 
Virginia Beach Board of Realtors; and Calvin 
Spain, an attorney. 

The council denied accusations by various 
speakers that the grbwth problem was a political 
scapegoat and an issue that seemed to arise 
every two years around council election time. 
But, members of the standing-room-only group 
in the chambers applauded statements like that 
of Mr. Sancilio who told the council, "I realize we 
have entered the biainial season when we begin 
to consider who will govern. Certainly, for those 
involved in seeking office, these are important 



days. But, with the power to govern cunes the 
responsitUli^ to gov«m responsibly." 

Itte coUBcU also ignored statemrats from 
Planning tMrector (Varies Carrington who (old 
them that a 60^y moratorium "won't buy me 
any suff lime " The planning departmoit was 
flooded Monday with aptdicatlons for more than 
5,000 housing units from area developers who 
feared the passage of a housing moratoriiun. 

THE COUNCIL, however, felt the moratoriian 
should relieve some of the pressure on the 
planning department. The Callis proposal calls 
for the planning department "to study, to 
analyze and to prepare a report outlining various 
managed growth techniques and strategies," as 
well as "to inventory existing zoning districts 
within the city, determine how much vacant land 
exists in each zoning daaaUication, the number 
of dwellhig units allowed and the number of 
outstanding use and building permits in each 
classificatk>n." At the same time, other city 
departments are "to study all systems' 
capacities such as water, sewer, off-site 
d^abiage, school 4uid transportation to dete^ . 



mine if existing capacities are adequate to allow 
continued development." The city sti^ wtU also 
review the current Capital Improvement 
Program to determine if thwe is monqr to meet 
obvkHis deficienciM in city services. 

"Explicitly, we are asMng for a plan for 
planning that is designed to link future 
devetopment to the availability of amrfkm and 
the cost to provide these services," Mr. CaUls 
said. 

According to Mr. Callis, the planning depart- 
ment will give priority to the plan for fMitfa 
growth over the processing of any apfdkatioM 
for housing that have been submitted. But, a 
problem arises with state law, which says 
subdiviskin plats must be processed within M 
dayi, and the planning department's failure to 
complete work on those q>|dicatk>iM may end in 
court suits against the city. 

Mr. Callis, however, is confident that the 
courts will iqthold the moratorium. "U is the 
ri^t of the council under the law, as a goveminf 
bwiy, to instruct the planning (topartmat to hold 
off on accepting api^icatkms for constnictkm 
until the study is completed." 




Jailer * misfits ^ 
getting the boot 



Nature's moisture nourishes growing things 



Virginia bftach's recent spring-lilte weather has all the 
growin$( things in the city fooled. The soft and frequent 
rains, combined with the unusually high temperatures, are 
bringing out/?buds on trees, bushes and flowers that 



normally don't bloom until spring. January can be a 
capricious month, though, so it may not be loQg before the 
hiii^s die and we return to the drabness of winter. (Sun 
nboto by I..OU Roberts) 



By LES LEHIGH 
Sun Stall Writer 

Citing "misfits" among the 
Jail staff as the biggrat problem 
feeing the Virginia Beach City 
Jail, Sheriff S.J. "Joe" &nith, 
who has been tat offloe only 
three weekpj hasr egls^ ^ 
jaO.firs .and is ^^t^fiw'^ 
phasing out five more in the 
next few weeks. 

"One thing we've ^t to do 
more of in jails," Sheriff Smith 
says, "is picking people suitable 
for the rehabilitation of 
prisoners. This is one thing I 
want (0 cmicenlrate on— to get 
the misfits out. That was our 
biggest problem here." 

A key personnel change has 
been the hiring of Ron 
Wakeham, a retired Marine 
with 24 years experience in 
naval correctional programs, 
as chief jailer. 



SHERIFF SMITH says he has 

also reassigned seven jailers to 
increase personnel strength at 
night. "The day shift has been 
overstaffed," he said, "and our 
problems are at night, and we 
need more people tlwn for 
security." 



AnoUier prime coDMrn of 
Sheriff Smith Is improving 
rehabilitatton ol (hose i^aced to 
confltwment at the jail. He 
explained, "We've been living 
in the dark ages in otv 
correctional system. Our prime 
goal is to make (hese people ln(o 
batter penons wton (hey leave 
here." rWm to. a(Mev«> ttiis 
goal include Improvlhg con- 
ditkms under which bunates 
live, revising (he overall 
operation of the jaU and raUng 
jail personnel standards. 

Believing that, "good food is 
one of the key items in inmate 
rehafoUitaikm" Sheriff Smith 
says he has hired the jail's Qrst 
full time cook. He is Mike 
Duonantuano, who recently 
retired afto- 22 years sovice u 
a£«^ In (heNavy. 

Other moves planned to 
improve inmate living con- 
ditions include allowing more 
lime for visitations, permitting 
telephone calls to rdativct at 
least twice a week, esUddiriiing 
a library within the jail, im- 
proving lifting In the cdl- 
blocks and repainting cell- 
blocks with lighter, pastel 
cotors. 



REVISING INTERNAL 

opwatkM» of the cky p^ vould 
be baied on a re¥U»w d the day* 
(0-day pnetidant vdtbto the 
facllUy. Sheriff Smith said be 
{rians to have a tami of In- 
dividuals studying criminal 
justice systems at Old 
Ou^aim (Mmntty ..aoaAia 
this tyvlew aad oAir auggastad 
operitkinal chai^. 



On (be poiat oi raising Jail 
personnel standards, Mierlff 
Smith says thoia wMdng i« 
become Jailers are now 
required (0 pass a thorough 
screening 1^ the dty pollea 
department and meet many 
quallficatkins required of sworn 
police of fleers. He says JaUast 
also will be reqidred to eom- 
'plMe tnilnbig ooursai In the 
criminal Justice system at 
state-sponsored schooto. He 
added he is "h<q>ing by Pab. U 
to have a om^iBte MM wbidi 
will meet thMB new 
criteria." 



Summarisiag his first 
weeks in office Sheriff SnAh 
says, "We've made simia Ug 
suides and wUl be makta^ 
more. We're on the way up." 



Bow Creek purchase up to voters 



After wrestling with the 
proposed purchase of Bow 
Creek Golf Course for months, 
the Vii^inia Beach City Council 
^Ifabday officially decided to 
flKe*4bC question before the 
vot«^. 'The resolution calling 
for a voter referendum passed 



unanimously, but is contingent 
upon the cily and land owner 
Edward Garcia reaching an 
agreeable price for (he land 
parcel. 

The council whose $1,035 
million offer for the 118-acre 



course was turned down, has 
agreed to have the land re- 
appraised. If the app-aisal is 
within 160,000 ot (he $1,035 
million, that will be (he price of 
the land. If no(, the two figures 
($1,035 millton ana the ap- 
praisal) will be averaged to get 



'Emerging City' opens Monday 



"Virginia Beach: An 
Emerging City," the city's 
filmed annual report, will 
premiere at 8 p.m. Monday in 
ttie Virginia Beach City Council 
chambers. 

The film will be shown 
Monday night by invitation only 
to councUmen, the press and 
local leaders. Hie public may 
view the report Tuesday 
through Thursday at 10:30 a.m.. 



12:15 p.m., 1:15 p.m., 3:30 p.m. 
and 8 p.m. in the chambers. 
After that time, the 22-minute, 
full<olor film will be available 
free of charge for civic clubs 
meetings, school classy and 
other iiiteresled groups. A 
q[>eaker (member of the city 
staff) also will be available to 
answer questions at club 
meetings upon request. A 
printed copy of the city's 1973-74 
budget will serve as the 



program for the report. (The 
flim will also be scheduM on 
television at a later date.) 

This is the city's firsl attempt 
at producing a Aimed annual 
report. TTie goal is for evwy 
Beach resident to see the report 
some time during the year.. 
Fihnipg and sound was dcme by 
Premiere Productions. Club 
viewings of the report may be 
scheduled through the Office of 
Public Information. 



Teaehers ask raises 



Tlie Virginia B«ich EdiK^tion Assn. 
(VBEA) has asked Ihe Virginia Beach 
School Board for across-the-board 
salary incrMses for teachers, with a 
base of $9,000 and a maximum of 114,400 
after 14 years of sarice. 

In iH-^enllng the 1974-75 propcsals fw 
salary and fringe benefits to the school 
board, William P Krupp, VBEA 
y^dCT t. cite^ s piraling infla tion and 
hm at iMiying power as the reasons for 
(he request for saJary increases. 

The ctarrent teach«^' contract calls 
fw begiming teachers to be paid |7,«0. 
Tlie maximum salary after 14 yearai 
expi^m<% is now $11, MO. 

A wige negotiating committee matk 
UD of schod >^rd members and headed 



by Dr. Roy A. Woods, school l»ard vice- 
chairman, has met twice with a VBEA 
committee, accordir^ to Robert H. 
DeFord Jr., schod board chairman. 

The school board c<^mittee has not 
yet issued a report with its 
recomm«i(toli<Mis to the full board for 
action, Mr. DeFwxl said. 

In addition to tte sabiry proposal, the 
VBEA also asked for* fringe benefits, 
including full payment of Iwspitalitalion 
insurance, full payment of state- 
required life insurance premiums, 
terminal pay for accwnulated aick 
iMve, imjMroved increment payraeniB 
fw advaiKed degoM rtatus, payment for 
professional pnaprove«fi«nt and 
esiaWi^mwit of a sick teive henk. 



the price that will appear on 
the ballot. Mr. Garcia has 
asked $1.5 milUon for the golf 
course. ■ 

Tlie proposal to purchase the 
land came last summer from 
residents of the Princess Anne 
Plaza area wh^'e the golf 
course is located. They feared a 
large housing development 
(proposed by the owner) would 
increase congestion in already 
over-crowded school facilities 
and in the area traffic situadon. 

Since the ^posal for the 
purchase, Ihecwmcil has heard 
several plans tar the property, 
including one to build 
retirement condominiums on- a 
portion of the land, retaining the 
tm as a golf Oiterse, "Die area 
residents, howevjr, urged that 
the mailer go to a referendum 
first and if drfealed, then othCT 
proposals OHild be mnsido-ed. 

A date for (he referemhon has 
not been s^ and probably won't 
be until the an^^isal is com- 
pleted and the price has been 
agr^d apoa. 




Closed 
council 

file VirgtHla Beach Ctty 
Cornell met Monday far 
one hour in ckMed setiton, 
open to neither the paUk 
MH- the preu. Tlie agenda 
listed Ihe only ttemi for 
dlscHSileR . as "ap- 
peMneBto" and a "legal" 
niatta-. In three meetbip 
■e fw thb year, the coancU 
bae met f«r a laUl of two 
faeurs »ui ntaie nl 
hdiiirf elsMd doers. 



Overdue water bills to 
reach consumers shortly 



Many Virginia Beach 
residents may have forgotten 
what a water bill kwks like, and 
may gel a surprise (his week 
when (hey receive their first 
water bill since the signing of 
the water contract with Norfolk 
last April. 

Wi(h (he exc^km of the 
Beach Borough, no city resideni 
has received a bill for six 
mon(h8. Billing was h^ up due 
to "the axMTOow transitkm of 
physical records and romfHito- 
{^tipamming from Norfolk lo 
the Beadi," according to Itevid 
Bri^t, Bl^)ervi8or of the Beadi 
Public Utilities Bib^u. Mr. 
Bright explained that ««fle 6m 
city has continued to take 
regular watw^mrtw reading, 
they have been unable to 
int>cess the biUa. The Beadi 
Borough has continued (o 
receive bills since those 



resklents were billed lhroU|^ 
the Virginia Beach Utilities 
D<!qpartment b^ore (he contract 
jyas sipied. 



BILLS TO reridenu of (he 
Lake Edward, Diamond 
S|Hings and ChesapMke Beach 
areM were mailed met (he 
weekaid. Those Included in (he 
second billing cycle to be 
mailed (his wedc are residcnu 
of the Thorou^Hwd, Lynnbavm 
Colony, Cape Story and 
Aragona areas. Ail bilto wiU be 
for a three month period (July, 
August and Septemb«-), like 
r^ular quarterty watCT bills. A 
•econd bill, for the quarter 
taicluding October, Novanber 
and Decmiber, win be mailed 
within a "reasonable lo^th of 
ttane"-oo earlter than G days 
after the flrs( blU. 0(her ci(y 
resMen(s can expect to re^ve 



their first bills within Ihe 
few weeks. Mr. BrMt 
estimated it wUl be July bolbra 
the city is cau0it iq> urith the 
UUing cycles. 

The contract signed with 
I^rfolk calU for the Beadi to 
pay Norfolk 48.S cents far 1,100 
galkms of water used. Vir^alM 
Beach took over the ittUlty 
system July 21, Md a watw i^ 
orcUnance for tbs Beadi mm 
adi^ited by the VirgMa Beaek 
aty CouBcfl in Saptm^er. The 
rate dffla for rerideida lo pay 
fi«m n eenu peri,0oe pdkms tf 
a connrao- uses 040,000 mQou* 
<rf wator per quarter to 10 cmta 
p«- 1,000 ga^Mis for perseea 
ueiiv 100,000 gilkins or more 
water pw quarter. The dW-. 
ferenM In the ratM BeaA 
resMems pay md (Iw nte paid 
to Norfolk goes to finance 
(^[iMvtkmal caau ot the syMras 
such as UUtaig and repairs. 



City to participate in state school survey 



aty Cowicil McMKtey aMhorised the raqioiditire 

of $10,000for the city to |»rtki|a(e in a door-tiHkior 

airvey lo be conducted by the city schods4n May. 

The Virginia Board of Education req^iirw that 

eadi school M g^qn conduct the Sury^ everyjhree 

Vai^B "^ departmaits, mclwling tfie^ 

(rf [banning ami the departmoK (rf 



years. 

(kparimeift , . 

Genomic (^eh>pn)eM, were asked by the adiool 

sy^KB if they w^d IU» (o fMrtk^te in the 

nrv^ by submittmg adtf tkmal ^aoAima to be 



f^e $10,000 apim^fftated M«Mkiy wOl cover the 
a»t of the city's partk^Mion hi the survey. The 
eMire swv^ wiU^ bdw^m $«,oeo and ISe.«00. 



accordtog to £3^ W^twm. a ncial p^chobgist 
in the dty sdMoU' roMrcb irffice. 

THE STATE rct^ta^ that kieal sdiool systans 
uk ^MStkms abMt nirniba- oi chiMvo ai a 
Wt^SbM, UMfr ifM. sex, g r ad e tev^, s rtert- 
attncbnce (piMe or privtte) and any phy^ mt 
emotiimal haad i Bap a. 

ta ^ttiM, itt Oc req^eM of cky deparmMMs, 
^estl^wMbetoJudedfedetormtoeed u ca tfoi w I 
tevid Of ^MMs, omspttloB ef pmott, Mtey 
levda, em^oyracot locMtoM. types ef b^MB and 
other queMioas wM4|will help (be dty with futm 
iriMAlng. ^ 



Tlw survey que^fons may be answered on a 
volumeo' bttris. TteBurv<i9 data to not esa fld e nt lal 
and reeidoiu WtU be informed In advaMe thtt tey 
are nM nq^ni (o mmwer the ipeatioM. 



-MJ. 




wiB be pM 10 

AppraAnM^ $21,000 of te 

(o^wd pay^ the teterHewers. fbe acbeirf lyum 
estlmales there are ap^eslmatdy B,000 
hoaacboMs in tim dty. 

In addUon. it win cert $0,010 teOMM to pMesa 
gattared i^ the dty^ ^ 



the MMV^an 
praeamgefrii 



T 



Comment 

Ifyou'reonly 
atankfuiaway 



Vacation travelling is more than a vital 
source of income for the City of Vindnia 
Beach. The change of pace it offers also is 
necessary to maintain peace of mind, as this 
wedc's Forum reports below. 

To lessen the impact the gasoline shortage 
has on tourism, the Virginia Beach 
OqMutmentc^ Tourist Development is aiming 
this year's advertising program at 
vacatiomrs who live closer to the Beach. The 
$371,000 budget will be spent almg the East 
Coast, particularly in cities like Washington, 
New Y(n*k and Philadelphia. .- 

It's a good idea the city has, and officials 
are confident the 30 per cent increase in 
tourism of last year over 1972 will be' 
maintained. 

Vii^nians and others who live within a gas 
tank away from the Beach have an advantage, 
too. They can take their vacatiois, have peace 
of mind and not have to worry about buying 
enou^ gasoline to return hmne. A good deal- 
all the way around. 



/ 
f 
f 
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Pbgt2-The$un-WMlnMday, January 23, 1974 ^ 



.,^. 



'*.-' 



Ciiyside 













BifUndamHer 



He wouldn 't wait 
even for Raquel 



Th« Virginia Beach City Council Chambers just 
aren't large enough to accomodate the crowds that 
have been turning out f<H- the last few meetings. 

Those persons who arrive as late as 1 :te p.m.— 
15 minutes prior to the fwmal meeting— find no 
seats available and barely room to stand inside the 
chambers. Such was the case when Mr. and Mrs. 
George Price, res^nte of the north end of the 
Beach, arrived at^onday's council session.^ 

^'m jist getting too old to stand up a long 
time," said Mrs. Price, who figured it would be a( 
least an hour before the council would hear the 
matter with which the couple was concerned. 

"I wouldn't wait that long to see Raquel 
Welch," Mr. Price said. 

(The two left the city administration building to 
embark on the trip home from the courthouse— 
without hearing what they had come for. II was just 
as well though. The council only instructed a group 
to consider the problems with the street closure at 
S7th Street, which was what the couple wanted to 
hear discu^ed.) ^ 

THE FREEDOM (rf Infonnaticm (FOI) Act was 
not passed to allow city councils and otlKr govern^ 
mental groiq» to "r«ich ummiminity" in closed 
session (m a questwn before presenting it to the 
public, as s(mie Virginia Beach City Councilman 
seem to think. 

Whra a matter like a mwalorium on hmising 
construction comes before the city council, the 
solution is not to hold the private squabbles of 
councilmen behind closed do(n^ by calling fw an 
execution session as Councilman Charles Gardner 
suggested Monday. The purpose oi the formal 
council session is to allow input in the decision 
makii^ process of the city. What good is it to hold a 
public meeting, and then have the matter decided 
by personal prejudices behind closed doors.? That 
makes the whole public meeting merely 
pafunct(N7 and just a waste erf time. 



FORTUNAHELY FOR Councihnan Curtis Payne 
and Councilman Getn^e Ferrell, they missed 
Monday's debate on the nM»«t(Mium. WhUe both 
coundlmen viae absmt, BSr. Payne probably 
woidd have prefered to be absent fa* a vacation in 
Fknida like Mr. Ferrell, rather than being 
hospitalized after aiffmng ctest pains ov&r the 
wedKnd. 

IF YOU WANT to keep posted on what the 
Virginia General Assembly is up to, the Virginia 
B&tch Public Inf(»tnation Office is providii^ a 
"l^islative service." 

Mato-ial available to area rraictents will include 
general reference materials, specific 1974 se^ion 
referwice materials and the "White Paper," a daily 
summary of legislation introduced in the Assembly. 
A citoen may r«}uesl c<^es ol the Virginia Co(te, 
ihe Manual at the General Assembly, reports of the 
AssemUy CMnmtoions and committer and "Mil 
service" of the Genoral Assembly, which lists all 
MUs and ra(rfuti<ms introduced in the House and 
S^iate (hiring the s^icm. 

Area organizations and citiKns wishit^ to 
pariicipale in the legislative service are urged to 
CMiiaci Services and Informatimi at 427-4111. 




«5.-.atf' 



Full moon 
shines on 
bare trees 

There's somefliing eerie 
and beauUfol aboirt a 
fall winter mooD shintaig 
through the bare 
branches of trees and 
aiaminating the night 
landscape. The angle of 
the photo caiuet the 
rising moon to hang 
snspoided tai the tree's 
branches, almost as if 
the tree tried to catch 
the moMi «Hi its ascmt 
faito the winter sky. Hie 
foil moon's pull causes 
Virginia Beach's 
highest tides and 
reinforces the rmnantic 
notion that everytiiing 
looks beaatifal by 
moonlight. (Son photo 
by Rod Mann) 



Forum 



In the midst of the energy 
crisis, what about tourism ? 



Hf 



•fvun 
Ah Iitdmt^Amt Nmapaper 



OAVtOROCAN 



MEM. WITTOH HMS 



IMrrMEWB.1 




WACN fUMJSNHe ONiroiuTiai 

WltaMiMMnwi 

tfl,Vi)|iMi 



A large amount of , Virginia 
Beach's income stems from its tourist 
trade. Last year's season was the best 
in the city's history, but this year's 
tourist season may be affected by the 
energy shortage. 

So far, no one seems to know 
exactly how the shortage will affect 
the season or whether a threatened 
federal gasoline rationing, plan will 
have to be implemented. 

Members of Congress and the 
federal administration have stated 
that tourism and travel are 
significant economic contributors to 
the general economy of our nation and 
most be protected. 

This week, Forum focuses on two 
enei^y meetings recently held in 
Wasldngton, D.C. and Jackson, Miss. 
Representatives of the 50 state travel 
promotion offices, officials pf the U.S. 
Travel Service and travel industry 
rqNT^entatives attended. Here are 
some of the more significant 
statements made at these two 
meetings: 



Gerald R. Ford 

Vice-presidait cS the United States 

"Despite the stress on avoiding 
unnecessary travel during the energy 
crisis, tourism should not be con- 
sidered either frivolous or ex- 
pendable. So vast and so inUinsic is 
this industry, that even slight ripples 
of change in its ^)eration swell to 
waves of high impact on the nation's 
life^yle and econ<Mnic structio*e. 
Tt^vel, therdore, must not be lo(^ed 
upon as a frivolmjs activity that is 
pleasurable but expendable. It is an 
essential part of our national financial 
{Hctoe. For that reasm we must 
make ev«-y effort to protect it." 



possible effects on tourism, and that 
tourism will be represented now at 
the highest levels of government." 

Dr. William Johnson 
Federal Energy Office 

"The government considers 
tourism important. Passenger trains 
and buses — including tour and 
charter buses — wiU be given 100 per 
cent of their diesel fuel requirements, 
based on need. If that need expands, 
fuel allocations for it will expand." 



Frederick B. Deitf" 
Secretary of Commerce 

"Americans must pi^pare for 
changes in their vacation styl^ — for 
example, speeds to 55 and avoiding 
long-di^uK^e driving on Sui.Jay wtoi 
gasoline stations are closed. Foo- those 
using airlines, there wiU be increased 
fares and reduced schedules." 



Robert E. I^eperd 

Director, Office of Energy Programs 

Department at Commerce 

"Americais won't be able to travel 
as much spontaiwously, so a greater 
emphasis in planning vacatiois will 
be necessary. Hie radius concept will 
become more and more important in 
travel. We've got to change our mode 
<rf appeal and our operation to em- 
phasize U'le lowest consumptk>n of 
enei^." 



Howard Baker 

U.S. Senator. Tennessee 

"I think we can assure you that no 
far-readri^ (tecisiMis on the energy 
sitiBrtMXi will be made in the future 
mOMA full conSderaUofi <rf the 



James G. Watt 

Director, Bureau of Ontdeer 

I^TcatiM 

"The Qmm of twrisni tifc y^r 



should be to stay close to home until 
the energy shortage eases." 



Robert "Hmm 

Chairman, Civil Aeronautics Board 

"Because fully 50 per c«it of all air 
travel in the U.S. today is 
discretionary or vacation travel, any 
severe cutback in fU6l availability 
would seriously damage the airline 
industry. For that reason, % per cent 
of necessary fuel based on the 1972 
allocation will be made available to 
national earners and 100 per coit of 
that same base will be available to the 
regional carriers." 



Ray Wright 

Director, American Petk-olena 

Institute » 

"There is indeed an energy 
shortage, one that will be with us for 
several years." 



Cbartes McMahan 
Executive vice-president 
Outdoor Resorts tst Amotea 

"If man vratki to |^y, then to cut 
off travel would result tn Iwman 
crisis, a crisis h« woidd avdd at 
(x-actically all costs." 



Dr. Charin ifetl«i 

SocMk^t, Market G^ien RoMrch 

I^UU|HV9 UtXM lUT UW^l^ WBl twS% 

go away dinii^ tte ener;^ oiA, 
Uiough thdr mei wUl imvt to Iw 
recfirected snnewhere ckse by. Hus, 
nearby attractions must be [xvsaited 
in such a way as to proviik the ex- 
citement and exotk an>^ wUch 
represeit tlw chai^ of pace ttet ■ 
nece s sar y to ga^y the p s yd i rt o^ad 
n^l €t trvnkn.*' 




Hidings 

By 

, J4ea% 
Sims 

Sun Editor 

It's a * nutty' way 
of doing business 



There's a good reason for that picture of a peanut 
(m the City of Suffolk's auto stickers. Suffolk is the 
home of Mr. Peanut, that duded-up, unstelled nut 
(tecked out with a top hat and cane. 

You can find Mr. Peanut's {Hcture in practically 
every grocery store in the U.S. And statues «f the 
swaggering little fellow are used as fence 
ornaments surrounding the Planters Nut and 
Chocolate Co., as it is known to long-time residents 
of Suffolk. 

Actually, since 1960, the company has been 
officially called Planters, a division of Standard 
Brands Inc., but the name change has not affected 
the product. Suffolk is {M'Obltbly the only city in the 
world where people can look you in the eye and say 
"speaking strickly peanuts" without cracking a 
smUe. 

PLANTERS IS, by far, the largest handler and 
marketer of nuts in the country. The Suffolk 
operation iH-ocesses over 100 billion nuts a year, 
accounting for 85 per cent of Planters total 
production. 

A. Obici (he went by first initial only), the 
founder of Planters, peddled hot roasted peanuts 
from a push-cart in the town square of Wilkes- 
Barre, Pa. around the turn of the coitury. The 
growth of Planters since then is much like a person 
eating peanuts — once Mr. Obici got started, he 
couldn't stop. When his business got too big for the 
push-cart, he opened a retail store. Then, since 
most of his nuts came from Virginia and North 
Carolina, Mr. Obici moved to Suffolk to be closer to 
his supply. 

Now Planters is a multi-million dollar business, 
handling more than 250 items and intxIiKing m(n« 
than 100 million cans and jars (d nuts annually. And 
they're not all peanuts ^ther, as any good init-lover 
knows. Planters also handles tree nuts, including 
cashews, filberts. Brazils, pecans, pistachios and 
ahncmds. 

IN FACT, peanuts are not really nuts but a 
vegetable, growing underground much like a 
potato. Planters buys its supply of peanuts between 
October and April, the peak harvesting period. 

The typical large-size, Virginia-type peanut 
«iters the Planters complex at the shelling mill 
«4iere intense vibrations shake off the shells, 
hopefully leaving only whole peanuts. The shells, 
which are the only part of the nut Planters does not 
utilize, are then burned. The nuts are sent to the 
processing plant or placed in cold storage for use in 
the off-inonths. 

Once in the eight-story processing plant, the 
peanuts are faist roasted to loosen the skins. Frank 
Coursen, manager of Planters packaging, and 
marketing services, says the idea is to minimize 
splits while maximizing "skin off." 

THOSE NUTS which are split are used in candy 
bars, ground into peanut butter or squeezed into oil. 
The whole nuts are either dry or oil roasted, then ' 
packaged into cans, jars or bags. 

The packaging is done by automatic machines, 
whether the nuts are placed in transparent bags, 
hermetically sealed cans or jars. The machines 
weigh out the desired amount of peanuts, fUl the 
containers and seal them. 

Undoubtedly, Mr. Peanut is proud of his product. 
And, Suffolk is proud of Mr. Peanut. Since the city 
merged with Nansemcmd county, residents have 
b^n able to say that Suffolk is the largest city area- 
wise in Virginia. Bui, don't you know, all along it 
was the nuttiest city in the world. 



How to subscribe 




Many of our rsaden prefer to get 
their personal copies of The Sun tiy 
mail. 

If you with The Sun to be mailed 
weekly to your home or business, m«l 
ut the coupon aid iwvioe will begin 
immediately. 

Mail To: 

Virginia Beach Sun 

Circulation Dept. 

138 Rosam^tRd. 

Virginia Beach, Va. 23452 



Mail The Sun To: 



I Name 



Addien 
City 



Statu 



Zip 



I 



lYr. 



n 6Mos.$4.S0() 3Mos.$2.50()| 

J 

■ w" — — — — — • ^ — — — — — — — -^ — — — ■ * ■ 



■MflaaaafloiaMai 



Hiii 



«M) 




HASSLES 




\ V> 



By 

Donna 

Hendrick 



Fuel-ish laughter 
has a hollow ring 



The energy crisis is no laughing matter to a rofW 
concerned people. But the entire shortage situation 
strikes me as so ludicrous sometimes that I can't 
h^p lauding. 

Weighing mileage data and fuel tank capacity in 
my mind and arriving at some ridiculous decision 
like not going to a party because of no gas— it's all 
part of the big hassle known as the fuel shortage. 

ON FRIDAYS I've been joining all the other 
Tidewater motorists in the long lines at the gas 
stations buying dwindling amounts of fuel to get 
through the weekend. 

The American weekend has suddenly become no 
fun with all the gas stations observing Sunday 
closing. You can drive only half a gas tank one way 
on Sunday because you need that other half of a 
tank to get back. 

The inanity of it all really struck me when I was 
invited to Roanoke one weekend but discovered I 
couldn't go because of the gas shortage. 

By computing the mileage to Roanoke and the 
capacity of my fuel tank limes the mileage I get per 
gallon. I determined that I might make it with two 
gallons of gas to spare. This posed no problem on 
Saturday for the trip there but was going to be a 
Whopper of a problem on Sunday for the trip home. 

I COUI-D .lUST picture myself stranded on the 
other side of the Hampton tunnel, crying on the 
shoulder of the tunnel guard, "But my calculations 
showed two gallons to spare." 

Ridiculous! 



Finding an open gas station that actually has 
gasoline is becoming America's favorite sport, 
perhaps second only to finding a price one can 
afford. 

The really good gas stations (translated: the 
really cheap ones) have had to impose ridiculous 
limits on the quantities of fuel they can sell each 
customer. 

My favorite seK-service station has imposed a 
10-gallon limit. My friendly neighborhood full- 
service station has done the same. Another self- 
service station has a $3 limit and a conveniently 
located slation at the Beach has a five-gallon limit. 

TUB. STATIONS have been forced to limit 
allocations to customers because their own 
allocations have been cut by their suppliers. So I 
and a lot of other drivers have started playing 
musical gas stations, hoH)ing from one to another 
like so many gasoline-powered rabbits, buying $3 
worth here and five gallons there to fill the tank. 

Then once the lank i§ filled I feel I'm a prime 
prospect for a rip-off. I know my car parked outside 
my apartment all alone at night is full of gas, and 
I'm sure everyone else knows it, top. 

I keep waiting for the morning when I fry 
to' drive lo work only to discover some thief in (he 
night has siphoned all that high-priced fuel out of 
mv car. 

The last time I went searching for a locking gas 
cap. (he guy at (he auto parts store just laughed at 
me. "Lady, we sell them as fast ks we get them." he 
said. "And we don't get them no more." 

WKIJ-. I THOUGHT to myself, if I can't find a 
locking gas cap. and I'm afraid to fill the tank for 
fear I'll be robbed, and I'm afraid not to fill (he tank 
for fear I'll run out of gas. then what am I supposed 
to do? 

My sorrowful question is one that millions are 
asking all over the country. "What are we supposed 
to do?" they want to knov*?. "How are we going to 
get to work, (o see our friends, lo (he grocery store, 
to church, (o school?" 

It's not funny. I know. It's a serious problem. 
But the fuel shortage does have its ridiculous side, 
and that's the side of (he problem I hope I can still 
iau0i at in mon(l» to come, even if that laughter 
has a hollow sound. 



foee/ 



by LoM Robert/ 




The Sun— Wednesday, January 23, 1974-Page 3 

Daniel hopes for j, 
more spending on 
defense projects 



One may not expect the eyes glimpsed through 
the face plate of a mud-stained motwcycle 
helmet to be accented with mascara, but 



inside that helmet is Peggy Scott, one of the 
better known female moto-cross racers in the 
area. 



WASHINGTON - Rep. 
Robert W Daniel Jr. (R-Va.) 
hopes the U.S. Congress in 1974 
will restrain domestic spending 
and extend the defense budget: 

Particular emphasis should 
be on continuation of the 
Trident and B-1 bomber 
programs, Rep. Daniel said in a 
telephone interview. 

The United States should 
continue lo construct nuclear 
power escorts tor carriers, Rep. 
-Daniel said. He said the use of 
nuclear power Is more im- 
portant than ever ^efore now 
that the world is experiencing a 
shortage of oil and other fuels. 



Rep. Daniel sajd he wanted to 
see the UvS. Navy further 
"modernized", with an em- 
phasis on high quality surface 
combatants. 



OS THE domestic scene, 
Rep. D<|plel ^ould like to see 
stat^'s<ta^J^^i«ieS;gK%iT%ore 
pre'ro^^^m 'deciding how to 
spend federal grant money. 
General revenue sharing Is the 
best method of getting federal 
nwney to bcal governments, 
according to Rep. Daniel. 
Categorical grants are not as 
successful, he said. 



'.•.•.*.•.•.•,•.•.•■ 



>:W:¥ASftW*=:y:¥:%Wx%-SS:-::?xvX%¥:-: 



Free directory lists 
state publications 



A directory listing all publications printed by the state 
of Virginia is now available to residents free of charge. 

The State Informational Directory includes lists of 
publications printed by state agencies on a regular basis, 
as well as annual and special reports released by the 
state. 

Most of the publications listed in the directory are of a 
statistical nature. The directory lists the report tjtle , a brief 
synopsis of the contents and how to receive Qopies^f each 
publication. 

Copies of the Slate informational Directory may be 
obtained from the Division of Slate Planning and Com- 
munity Affairs, 1010 James Madison Building, 109 
Governor St., Richmond, Va. 23219. 



Arts groups seek funds 

Commission okays budget requests 



--The Virginia Beach Com- 
mission on the Arts and 
Humanities is now4)eginning to 
fulfill its original purpose, as 
outlined by the city council, to 
review budget requests from 
cultural organizations which 
need city funds to continue their 
programs. 
At last week's commission 



meeting, members voted to 
accept the recommendations of 
the commission's finance 
committee on budget requests 
from cultural groups, to be 
Included in the city's budget for 
fiscal year 1974-75 if approved in 
budget hearings conducted by 
the city manager. 
The commission was required 



to move quickly to review all 
budget requests before they are 
submitted to the city manager's 
office for a budget hearing. The 
requests must be submitted by 
the end of this month. 

THE VIRGINIA Beach 
Friends of Music requested 
funds to help meet anticipated 



Navy man trains at Sun 



The Sun,, in cooperation with 
the Navy, now has a new em- 
ploye who Is obtaining vital on- 
the-job training In the 
newspapo- field through the 
Navy's Transition employment 
program. ty 

Robert M. "Bob " Kuhn, The 
Sun's newest employe, Is a 
Navy mail attached to VF-31 at 
Naval Air Station Oceana. 

Although he will not officially 
leave the Navy until April, he is 
worlcing at The Sun until then 
under the Transition program 




KUHN 



designed to offer job training to 
servicemen during their last 
Months of service. i" 

Mr. Kuhn started work at The 
Sun two weeks ago and will 
continue working in both the 
advertising and editorial 
department^ of the paper until 
the end of March. The three- 
month program Is offered to all 
Navy men who have four or 
more years' Navy service. 

The Navy continues to pay his 
salary while he is working at 
The Sun. Twice a week, he 
checks in with the chief of his 
squadron to report on his job 
progress. Other than that, he 
has no contact with the Navy 
until" he goes through the final 
processing for his release from 
the service. 

MR. KUHN. 25, is from 
Roselle, HI., a suburb of 
Qiicago. He became interested 
in the newspaper field when he 
worked on his high school 
newspaper and yearbook. 

His Navy job as an avionics 
technician involves work with 
electronics, but he said the field 
did not interest him as much as 
newspaper work. 

After he is released from the 
Navy, he plans to return to the 
Chicago area to enter the 
newspaper field, either in ad- 
vertising or editorial work. 



Eventually, he said he would 
like to go into business for 
hlmselUn a'Telgted field. 1 

Although he has been with 
The Sun only two weeks, Mr. 
Kuhn thinks his new job is 
"fantastic." 

"I've learned a tremendous 
amount in the few days I've 
been here," he said. 

Neal Sims, Sun editor, said, 
"We're very pleased to 
cooperate with the Navy In this 
program, and we hope we can 
get more Transition candidates 
like Bob." 



increases in guest artist fees. 
Each year, the Friends of Music 
sponsors a series of special 
appearances by artists In 
various musical fields. 

The Dance Guild of Virginia 
(formerly Tidewater Dance 
Guild) requested funds to help 
bring a dlalogue-llve per- 
formance version of the ballet 
"Peter and the Wolf" ,to local 
school children. 

The Virginia Beach Civic 
Symphony Orchestra requested 
funds to Increase the or- 
chestra's size by 30 per cent and 
to help meet operational ex- 
penses for the coi|^g year. 

Tf(g commlssl(»IUel( will ask 
the city for funds to continue 
operating this year and for 
funds for next year's 
operations. The commission's 
1974-75 budget request will 
Include funds to sponsor a 
cltywlde arts festival, ten- 
tatively scheduled for the 
spring of 1975, 

After review by the city 
manager's office, the com- 
mission's budget^ requests will 
be heard by the city council. 




"Hist/iin 



NEW 

ADVERTISING RATES 

CLASSIFIED & RETAIL DISPLAY 

$2.52 

per column inch 

NO COISfTRACT NSCiSSAItY 
Efffctive Jan. 9. 1974 

Circulation 18,(^0 to 25,000 wfeekly 
Minimum circulation 18,000 weekly 

"it pays to advertise 

, in The Sun" 

CALL 486-3430 TODAY I 
ASK FOR APVERTISINQ. 



»»» »* i >o* **^* <»*»*** *"* - 



■????TyT7 TTTgMTtE C 



:«•••• •••••••••••*■ 



Onr Spagbetti 
is not for Begtamen. 






IX 



,y 



ALL YOU CAN EAT 

Every Wednesday 5-9 P,M, 



SHOW YOUR COLORS 

Auto Antenna Flags - 59' each 

(Flags are 4" x 6" with Gold Fringe 
i and Color Fast) 

; IMMEDIATE DELIVERY 

\ 1,000 ADDRESS LABELS -79^ 

I (3 lines per label) 

Mailed Only to Address on Labels 
Be Sure to Print and Give Zip Code 

\ (Allow 6 to 8 weeks for delivery of Labels) 

No Stamps or CODs Please 

ipRlCES SHOWN INCLUDE TAX AND POSTAGE ON ALL ITEMS * 
i CUT OUT AND TAPE TO FRONT OF ENVELOPE { 



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It's for 



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1009 LASKIN RD. 
3816 E. LITTCE CREEK RD 



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double G enterpriGes 



special Prices to Organixations When Purchased in Large Lots. 
Write for Special Prices giving Adorcss and Phone Number. 



^^■^MH 




arts 



Page 4-TIm Sun-Wwhw^fiay, January 23, 1974 



Beach clubs tuning-up for tournament 



Wrestling season ante's its next to last week 
with a heavy mat schedule on tap. Beach teams are 
involved in nine dual matches this week. Coaches 
will be preparing their teams for the upcoming 
Eastern District tournament, while local teams try 
to contirtde their mastery over outside rivals. The 
Beach holds an impressive 18-4-2 record against 
outside competition. 

TONIGHT 

Cox at BodierT. Washington 

Defending state champion Cox shows no signs of 
weakening. The Falcons have coasted to an 8-0 
mark ^is season, and have been seriously 
threatened only once. Kempsville gave Cox their 
only scare before faUing 22-21. The Falcons have 
won 36 consecutive dual matches in dominating the 
Eastern District over the past three years. 

The Falcon drive toward another state title has 
been spearheaded by Chris Conkwright, Mike 
Newbern and Jim Gaudreau. The contingent of 
returning state titlists are undefeated this season, 
and have combined for a 33-0 record. Glen 
Flethousen is threatening to join the trio in the state 
winners' circle. Felthousen is undefeated in 119- 
pound action. Freshman Bob Battalio has also been 
impressive of late gaining a draw with 98-pound 
state champ Ken Nowlin of Princess Anne. 

Booker T. Washington's best performance of the 
year to date was an early season tie With Kemps- 
ville. Cox should have little trouble in adding 
another notch to their victory belt. 

^ Kellam at Princess Anne * 

A Beach clash, which could be the closest match 
of the week, considering the clubs recent per- 
formances. Both teams enter the match with 
winning records, and are coming off impressive 
wins Saturday. Princess Anne blasted Granby to 
improve their record to 4-3, while Kellam outlasted 
Western Branch improving their mark to 5-3. 

Princess Anne's strength lies in the lighter 
weights. Nowlin has only the draw against Battalio 
to stain his record. Jim Benjumea (132-pound) won 
the Falcon Invitational Tournament title in his 
weight class, and has lost only once this season. The 
Cavaliers downfall has been in the upper-weights. 

Kellam has been strong in those divisions where 
the Cavaliers have a proven weakness. Charles 
Skipper (183-pound) and George Irby 
(heavyweight) have given the Knights a potent one- 
two punch. Aldophus Haynes and Gene Bunn have 



Preview 




given Kellam solid performances in the middle 
weights. Bunn is undefeated. 

If the Knights can stay within striking distance 
in the early going, they could score an Qpset. 



First Colonial at Norview 

ss» ■ , 

First Colonial is one of the hottest teams in the 
Beach. The Patriots are undefeated over the last 
two weeks as their dual match record improved to 
5-3. 

Norview has been the one Norfolk school to 
challenge the Beach's wrestling supremacy. The 
Pilots own a 2-0-1 record in head to head com- 
petition with local teams. Norview should test the 
resurgent Patriots. 

First Colonial's strength has been in the middle 
weights. Freeman Gregg, Ed Smith and Jerry 
Pontes have spearheaded the surge! Gregg is un- 
defeated in 138-pound action this season. 

If the Patriots continue their fine play, ^ey 
could becorhe the first Beach school to defeat the 
Pilots. 

Maury at Bayside 



Bayside is the only Beach wrestling squad that 



After Sunset 4 



High Spots 
at Nig h t S pots 



This entire space consists of paid advertising 



The enterior decorated 
wi t h S k i -Eq u ip men l , po st ers , 



in Tidewater 




etc. is now being remodeled to 
accomodate more people and 
allow more room for fun. 

Visit Ihe Slowe Away, 
located at 225 17(h St., Va. 
Beach; open from 12 Noon to 
1 a.m.. YOU'LL LOVE THE 
PLACE!!! 



^ THE STOWE AWAY- 
'Named after Slowe, Vermont, 
'k favorite skiing spot of 
owners Jerry Barnard, Hughs 
"Burton, and Woody Barnes, is 
noted for it's genuinely 
Iriendly atmospheres. A fairly 
new establishment (opep for 
only 5 months). The Slowe 
'Away features such en- 
leriainmenl as a Footsball 
Table, Poole Table, Electro' 
'Kennel Club, Color TV and all 
the NFL Football Games, and 
Ski Movies every Thursday 
night beginning at 9 p.m. The 
Special for Ski Night is 5 for 
&1. 




LYNNHAVEN LOUNGE— 

"Thebest in country rock bands 
now appear every night 
except Mondays a* The 
Lynnhaven Lounge. Tuesday, 
Thursday & Sunday the 
Country Ravens appear; 
Wednesday. Friday and 
Saturday. The Atlantic 

Coastline. 

Open from 10 a.m. to 1 a.m.. 
The Lynnhaven Lounge 

is located at the Mini-Mall on 
South Lynnhaven Rd. Take 
Exit 5 off the Expressway. For 
a fun-filled evening of 
dancing, it's the place to go! 



BLUE PETE'S-Features 

"B hte Gra sg'everySaturda y 3 

p.m. to 6 p.m. Fresh seafood 

and fine entertainment is their 

specialty. 

THE SHACK located at 218- 
171h St. is known by the locals 
as "THE PLACE , IN 
VIRGINIA BEACH". The 
Shack is open from 6 p.m. to 1 
a.m. Mon. thru Sat. and 3 p.m. 
to 1 a.hi. on Sun. It promises to 
be a night filled with excellent 
food, beverage, and fun! 



MR. ED'S PANCAKES- 
Centrally located between 
Atlantic Ave. and Rosemont 
Rd. is brand new on the 
Virginia Beach Scene. After 
an evening of enterta inment to 
be sure to stqj by Mr. Ed's, 
featuring HOME COOKED 
MEALS and DELICIOUS 
PANCAKES -24 HOURS A 
DAY! ! 



DINE. 



^" ^ 






475 S. LYNNHAVEN ROAD 
MINI-MALL 340-9547 



ey#. Sd^ Pancakes 

1752 Virginia Beach Blvfl. 

OPEN 24 HOURS A DAY 



BIUE BLUE GRASS 

n_ f ENTERTAINMENT 

ftTE S EVERY 

Back Bay SATURDAY 

Marina Restaurant 3p.m.to6p.m 

ALL YOU CAN EAT 

Thurs. and Friday Oysters $4.00 

¥md. SMMTMd, or on the Half SMI 

S^rtlay-StMmed ^rimp $4.» 

Suwtoy-FWi McW $3.00 

1^ N. MUDDY CREEK RD. 4^2MS 

<»OHlt SUNDAY THOTWAY 1 1 A.II. TO MUDNIGHT 
mOAY AND SATUWJAY U NOON TO 1 A-M. 




.425-5612 



Evwy Tueidiv Night is SKI NIGHT At Tlw SHACK 
- F«Murln9*SKI FLICK^- 



sporto a losing rec(Mrd. The Martins have yet to win 
in the nuMth ^ January and have now dropped four 
straight dual matches. Baysi<te's seasonal slate 
stands at 2-5. 

r' 

Jjosi weelc was not without its bright spots for the 
Marlins. Clarem:e fiillups upset Lake Taylor's 
highly regarded Timmy Vaughn, while. Brian 
Jq|uis(m continued his perscnal hot strealc in 185- 
pound action. 

Maury has yet to win a dual match this season, 
and last week suffered a crushing defeat to Cox. A 
match against Maury could be just what Bayside 
needs to turn the season around. 

FRIDAY 

Kempsville at Norfolk Academy 

Kempsville has won their last three matches 
improving their record to 5-1-2. The Chiefs only loss 
was a one-point setback at the hands of Cox. 

The Chiefs are especially strong in the lower 
weights and consistently move out to comfortable 
_ leads in the early going. Heavyweight Mark 
RimajTski gives Kempsville an excellent finishing 
act. Rimaraki is unctefeated since recovering from 
an injury. 

Norfolk AcadeAiy is outclassed in taking on the 
Chiefs. 

SATURDAY 

Cox at First Colonial 

First Colonial should test Cox, but the Falcons 
overall team balance may be too much too over- 
come. 

Booker T. Washington at Bayside 

Bayside needs this match, if they are going to 
have a winning season. Booker T. Washington is 
one of the stronger Norfolk schools in the district. It 
should be close. . , 

Princess Anne at Kempsville 

Two of the strongej teams in the Beach 
meet head to head. Princess Anne and Kempsville 
are both blessed with strong wrestlers in the lower 
weights, but both have been plagued by a lack of 
strong upper-weight grapplers. Rimarski's 
strength in the heavyweight class could be the 
difference for the Chiefs. 

Bayside beaten by 
Norview 80-75 




By.IOHNBANNON 

Sports Editor 

Bayside basketball Coach 

Conrad Parker must have felt 

like he was watching an instant 

replay Friday night. 

For the second time this 
-season - the Ma r li n s - batt led a 



but Whisenton hitting over the 
Marlin 2-3 zone quickly pushed 
the Pilots to a 12-6 lead. Baskets 
by Gross and forward Jim 
Goffigan pulled thf Marlins 
within 12-10 by the end of the 
first quarter. 
— N o rv i ew' & Curt is Y o un g c a me 



SIDELINES 

By 

John 
Bannon 

Sports Editor 



Shortchange job 
in own district 

Something is rotten in the Eastern District. 

Norfolk high school basketball teams have 
rolled to an impressive record against Virginia 
Beach foes thus far this season. In searching for 
reasons for disparity in success, one answer im- 
mediately jumps to the forefront. The basketball 
talent in the neighboring city is clearly superior. 

A closer examination of the subject will reveal a 
more multi-sided view of losing local basketball. 
Usiially the gripes of a loser can be written off as 
just frustration. In this instance the complaints are 
more than just flapping jaws in the wind. 

^IN THE FIRST 13 Norfolk-Beach con- 

frontations, eight were played in Norfolk. Thei 

complete schedule finds local clubs with a 16-15 
deficit in home-court advantage. Bocrfcer T. 
Washington has the most favorable schedule, 
facing five Beach teams on their home court. How 
the Beach with their six teams to five margin over 
Norfolk, ended up on the short end of the schedule 
should be chronicled in "Ripley's Believe It or 
Not." 

Last year's football schedule offers an in- 
teresting contrast. The Beach held a 12-10 margin in 
home-field advantage over Norfolk. The ratio 
properly reflects the composition of the district. 

Bayside Kellam and First Colonial finished in 
the first division of the Eastern District. Theu* 
combined 5-2 home record against Norfolk 
clubs was of no small consequence in their gridiron 
strivings. 

PERHAPS EVEN more disturbing is the 
' eligibility double standard in the Eastern District. 
Bodcer T. Washington sophomore Ronnie Valentine 
has been in the center of a season-long controversy. 
The other Norfolk schools claim that Valentine is 
not in the Bookers school zone. After averaging 25 
points in the Bookers first five games, Valentine 
was held out of all the Booker's district games — 
until the Jan. 16 contest against Princess Anne. 

"He (Valentine) doesn't play against Norview, 
but he plays against us," said a disgruntled 
Cavalier Coach Leo Anthony. "They must figure I 
don't know the players." 

When Anthony confronted Bboker Coach John 
Milbourne over the use of Valentine, the Booker 
mentor responded with a litany of players who live 
in one school zone and play for a different Norfolk 
school. Apparently, the rule of "everylxxly's doing 
■it" reigns supreme in Norfolk. 

"I'm tired of hearing the Beach can't compete 
With ^orfolk," says Antifiony^" If I could go uit and 
^ecriut any ballplayer I wanted. Princess Anne 
would be awfully tough to beat." Anthony's 
rationale is not too far off base. Three Beach 
basketball teams immediately come to mind, who 
with the addition of just one more solid performer, 
would be of championship caliber. 




Norfolk school on even terms, 
playing well enough to win only 
to lose out in the closing 
seconds. Norview was 
Bayside's tormentor this time 
easing out a tight 80-75 Eastern 
District win. 

Pilot guard Conrad Whisenton 
sank three free throws in the 
final :22 seconds to insure the 
triumph. Free throws played an 
important role in Norview's 
win. Eight of the Pilots last 14 
points were counted at the Hne. 
Whisenton was the major 
culprit hitting on seven straight 
from the line over the final 
three minutes. 

.lOK McNAIR started 
Norview's foul shooting spree 
hitting the first of a one and one 
to push the Pilot margin to 67- 
60. The seven-point bulge was 
the widest enjoyed by either 
team in Ihe contest, which wat 
tied 12 times. 

Center Elton Gross, who was 
the .game's high-scorer, and 
guard Ricky Fletcher combined 
to lead a Bayside charge that 
sliced Norview's lead. On a 
night of .^arhn flurries. Gross 
started the Marlin comeback 
with a free throw. The star 
pivotman followed with a shcx't 
jumper and the gap had closed 
to four points. Fletcher 
sandwiched two long-range 
jumpers around a Gross lay-up, 
and the Norview lead had been 
shortened to 71-69. 

A Whisenton bucket a Carlos 
Hughes tap-in afnd two 
Whisenton free throWs and the 
lead had again swelled to^x 
points. 

After the six point Pilot 
barrage, the Marlins regrouped 
for their final rally of the night. 
Cecil Duke hit a corner jumper 
on the tail-end of a fast break. 
Gross counted on two pressure- 
pad(ed free throws and the 
Marlire were track within two. 

K/\V8IDK PR|:SSED the 

inbouncfe pass fdlowing Gross 
free throws, and one of the most 
crucial plays of the contest 
unfolded. The rrferee wWstled 
Joe Osborne for a blocking 
violation on Whisenton. 
Charitably, the call could be 
termed questionable. 

"I dcm't believe in one call 
making the difference in a 
game. iMit we ware within toi*o 
and anything could have 
happened if the call had gone 
the <<her way." said Parker. 

Unfortuni^y, the <al] wmM 
Norview's Way and Wh^ntsn - 
went into Hs free ttvow mci to 
decide the imie. 
' The Kane «^ iMitfed by 



off the bench at the start of the 
second quarter to push the 
Pilots into their second six-point 
lead of the game at 16-10. 
Goffigan hit two buckets to knot 
matters at 22-22. The two teams 
traded buckets until half-time, 
which ended at 30-30. 

Gross hit a jumper to start the 
second half to give Bayside tiit- 
lead. It was the last time the 
Marlins would hold an 
advantage. Despite repeated 
challenges, the Marlins could 
never pull ahead of Norview 
over the remaining 16 mimites. 



THERE ARE other annoyances involved in 
competing against Norfolk. Booker T. Washington 
informed Princess Anne that their Tuesday night 
game had been switched to Wednesday on 'Hiesday 
morning. The Eastern District Tournament is 
played on a court (the Nwfolk Arena) that both 
Booker T., Washington and Maury call home. 

Anthony muses about the possibility of the 
Beach starting their own district. He is not alone. 
Many city football and basketball coaches have 
mulled over the idea. 

Unless Norfolk can do a remarkable job of house 
cleaning, the suggestion seems to merit some 
serious consideration by the Virginia Beach school 
hierarchy. 




RAYSIDR'S RLTDN Grass (S«) 
hirtllm Norview')! Joe l^ftMr (I)) 
for lob pm%% in aeUM PrM^ t^0IL at 



iMtiM k«r4. Nil to m avail as Pilots 
m-n. tnm pbnto by Rod 

» 



^ 



^-* 



The Sun-Wadnesday, January 23, 1974-^9a 5 



Chances for district berth narrowing for local clubs 



Beach basketball was respecuble last week. Local 
tMms managed their first wins over the Norfolk schools 
m the Eastern District. Princess Anne and First Ck>k>nial 
registered the triumiAs, and the 9each posted a 2-4 mark 
in confrontations with Norfolk. 

THISWEEK 

Bayside 

Bayside's record has dropped to 6-5, but more im- 
portantly the Marlins are a poor 1-3 in district play. Coach 
Conrad Parker's search for a district tournament spot 
reaches a pivotal point this week. The Marlins face Maury 
on the road Friday, and host First Colonial on Tuesday. 

Bayside has been led by the sterling play of pivotman ^ 
Elton Gross. The 6'5" senior leads his club in both 
rebounding and scoring. He has hitpvfer 30 points on^our 
differoit occasions this season, and h averaging over 25 
points a game. 

Gross' talents will be severely tested in the Maury 
contest . ITie Commodores have a first-rate center of theu- 
own in Kariton Hilton. The 6'5" saiior had a 41-point effort 
last week, tops in the Eastern District so far this season. 
The Gross-Hilton match-up should be the highlight of high 
school basketball action this week. 

Without Gross holding Hilton to at least a standoff, 
Bayside doesn't have a prayer. Hilton is not the only gun 
in the Commodore arsenal. Guards Vic Jones and Henry 

RasketbalFs week 



psiem 



Kellam 



Collins give the Commodores a potent outside shooting 
attack. In the majority of games Bayside has lost, their 
guards have been badly outscored. 

Martin forward Jim Gofflgan, being the most mobile 
and best shooting forward on the court, should help to 
offset some of the Maury backcourt's offensive produce 
, lion. The majority of the burden still rests with guards 
Ricky Fletcher, Joe Osborne and Roscoe Coles, in keeping 
the slick shooting Jones and Collins in check. 



Patriots upset Lake Taylor 83-70 



Saturday- 
Princess Anne 52 
Great Bridge 41 

Princess Anne unleashed 
their sticky defenses and rolled 
to a 53-41 win over Southeastern 
District rival Great Bridge 
Saturday night at Princess, 
Anne. It was the third 
successive triumph for the 
Cavaliers, who are now 9-3 on 
the vear. 

Ttie Cavaliers dispatched of 
the Wildcats early bursting to 
15-8 first quarter lead. The 
defensive-minded Cavaliers 
protected the lead throughout 
the contest. The Cavaliers went 
to the locker room at the half 
holding a 30-23 lead. 

Thanks to their fine defensive 
effort,, Princess Anne was even 
able to weather a six-point third 
quarter performance. Great 
Bridge failed to take advantage 
of Princess Anne's scoring 
drought managing only eight 
third quarter points. 

The Cavaliers put the game 
away in the fourth quarter 
outscoring Great Bridge 17-10 
ojiywith fwward George Purdin 
leading the way. Purdin hit tar a 
game-high 14 points. John 
Paden and ToiA Callan also hit 
for double figures in a balanced 
scoring effort. 

Tuesday night Princess Anne 
Was at Bayside. 



Jan. 16 




Friday 



atrocious 19 of 34 effort from the 
foul Une. Kellam' failed to 
capitalize on the Cavalier 
shortcoming connecting on only 
10 of their 17 free throw 
attempts. 

Princess Anne's John Paden 
and the Knights Gary 
WooeHiouse and Jim Perkins 
tied for scoring honors with 17 
points apiece. Kellam is now 1- 
10 on the year. / 

Tuesday night Kellam host^ 
Maury. 

Granby 72 
Kempsvi!le59 

Granby continued to be the 
scourge o{ Beach teams with 
their third win over a local club 
in as many tries. The 
Comets made Kempsville their 
newest victim dropping the 
Chiefs 72-59. 

Princeu Anne S3 



The Chiefs fell behind 17-12 in 
the opening quarter and never 
seriously challenged the district 
leaders. Kempsville remains 
mired in thieir mid-season 
slump. After a brilliant start, 
the Chiefs have managed only 
one win since the vacation 
break. 

Center Britt GUssoh and 
guard Billy Foster were the lone 
Kempsville guns. Glisson hit for 
a game-high 22 points while 
Foster contributed 15 points. It 
wasn't enough in the face of the 
balanced Comftt effort, 
'kempsville is now 6-5 overall 
and 1-3 in the district. 

Tuesday night Kempsville 
hosted Lake Taylcx*. 



Princess Anne 67 
Booker T. Washington 6S 

«» "Th6 greatest comeback I've 
ever been associated with," 
said an elated Princess Anne 
coach Leo Anthony. 

The Cavaliers trailed by 19 
points at the half, 21 in the third 
quarter, but stormed back to tie 
the game at the end of 
regulation. Booker T. 
Washington jumped ahead 
earljyn the overtime period on 
a bas%t by Ronnie Valentine. 
George Purdin tied the game at 
65-65 on a basket to set-up the 
dramatic ending. 

The Bookers opted to hold for 
the last shot and called time 
with :07 remaining in the 
'overtime period. The Bookers 
inbounded the ball at half-court, 
but John Paden tapped the ball 
to teammate Tom Callan. The 
Cavalier guard fed the ball back 
to Paden, who scored at the 
buzzer. 

A great second half defensive 
performance enabled Princess 
Anne to score the Beach's first 
victory of the season over a 
Norfolk School. 



Bayside lost their first meeting with First Colonial 
despite a distinct edge in rebounding. After building a b^ 
second quarter lead by using their big men, the Marlins 
let the game evolve into one of run and shoot, llie Patriots 
ran their opposition out of the gym. Bayside can not afford 
to make the same mistake twice. 



Cox 



Cox has had a season full of trouble. The biggest 
problem is a Ml record. Now promising sophomore 
center Chris Reich is out indefinitly with a broken hand. 
Add Lake Taylor at home Friday night and Booker T. 
Washington on the road Tuesday, and Cox's woes seem far 
from over. 

Forward Randy Robinson continues to score at a rapid 
clip for the Falcons. John Richards has improved his 
offensive output of late, The Falcons have even gotten 
over their early season habit of third quarter collapses. 
All of this has not been enough though. Cox is anchored at 
the bottom of the district standings with an 0-4 league 
mark. 

The two Norfolk schools are tough competition for a 
team trying to turn a season around. 

First Colonial 

First Colonial is a surprising challenger for the 
Eastern District title. After splitting with Norfolk schools 
last week, the Patriots are in the thick of the title fight 
with a 3-1 league record. This week First Colonial faces 
two teams which they defeated the first time around. The 
Patriots host Kellam Friday night before their Tuesday 
confrontation with Bayside. "~ 

The two opponents will find one thing changed about 
the Patriots.. Speedy Gainer is still their leading scorer. 
Cleveland Spellamn is still coming off the bench to pick-up 
the club when it falters. Bert Lewis is the change. The star 
forward was mired in a season-long shooting slump. No 
more though, Lewis has hit for over 20 points in three of 
his last four games. 

With Lewis now playing up to his potential, the Patriots 
have become a formidable club. 



Coach Willie Brey has had a season of frustratkin in hU 
.irst year Is varsity basketball coach. Kellam has lost 
eight straight and is 1-10 on the year. The Knights stay in 
the Beach this week with games against First Colonial 
Friday night and Kempsville Tuesday. Both times the 
Kniipits are on the road. 

Kellam finally turned in a respectable defenlive 
performance in holding Princess Anne to 63 points. The 
Knights had given up 354 points in their (H^vious four 
contests. 

Forward Gary Woodhouse has played good defense 
and led the Knights in scoring throughout the season. 
Kellam must play solid team defense, if they are to break 
out of theiraslump. 



Kempivllle 



Kempsville reached the Christmas break with an 
excell«it 5-2 record. Everything has gone sour after the 
holiday vacation. The Chiefs have won only one game in 
the month of January. 

Forward Oliver Mayfield has come d^n strong for the. 



Chiefs. Mayfield has hit for double figures in every game 
this month. His best perforinance came last week against 
Cox wlien he poured through 2S points. 

Center Britt Glisson seems to have righled himself 
after a mild tailspin scoring 50 points in two games this 
week. The schedule is somewhat kind to the Chiefs this 
week with Booker T. Washington on Friday and Kellam 
Tuesday. If Kempsville is to challenge for a tournament 
berth, the Chiefs need both games. 
« ■ 



Princeii Anne 



Princess Anne is the hottest team in the Beach. The 
Cavaliers have won three straight, and have a 3-1 district 
mark. Their only game this week finds them hosting 
Norview Friday night. 

Coach Leo Anthony's charges have proven good 
defense can keep them close to a more talented opponent, 
Granby, despite a wealth of talent, only edged Princess 
Anne on the strength of a last second basket. The 
Cavaliers were the first team to upset a Norfolk school 
with a two-point overtime win over Booker T. Washington. 
Tight second half defense was the key in both efforts. 

Bayside proved Norview can be rattled, if their run- 
ning game can be thrown off track. The Cavalier defense 
will once again be the key. 



Sports Calendar 



Beach grapplers continue mastery 
ONM rivalswitb 4-1 peyf orinance 



First Colonial 83 
I.,ake Taylor 70 

First Colonial Coach Alton 
Hill started the week with the 
statement, "the party's over" 
in reference to three straight 
games against Norfolk schools. 
Friday night the party was 
far from over. 

In the friendly confines d 
their own gym, the Patriots 
rebounded from a Tuesday 
night loss to Granby, and 
surprised favored Lake Taylor 
83-70. 

. First Ccrionial continues to be 
the surprise team in the Beach 
this season improving their 
irecord to 7-2. The Patriots are in 
jthe thick of the Eastern District 
title chase with a 3-1 league 
Ncord. 

■ Guard Speedy Gainer, absent 
ft-om the Granby loss, led the 
Patriots wiQi a 27-point scoring 
tffort, but it was forward Bert 
faewis who keyed the triumirfi. 
Lewis complimented Gainer's 
perfcH-mance with 26 points. 
More importantly the 6'4" 
forward turned in his best 
rebounding perfcrmance of the 
jeason. Lewis battled the taller 
Titans mi even terms pulling 
down 15 important rebounds. 

The Patriots jumped to an 
early' lead and Lake Taylor 
trailed 53-45 entering tte final 
quarter. The Patriots needed a 
hot shooting final stanza to 
stave off the hard charging 
Titans. In the high scoring 
^riod First Ci^onial outscored 
fheir adversary 30-25. 
« Titan star Tommy Graves 
took scoring hontfrs with 28 
points. 

Tuesday night the Patriots 
travelled to Booker T. 
Washington. 

Princess Anne 63 
Kellam 62 

When you are g«ng bad 
nothing goes right. 

Kellam had lost seven 
straight entering Friday's 
game, while Princess Anne was 
coming off their biggest wig of 
Uie seasoi. Both teams luck ran 
true to form. Princes Anne 
escaped with a 63-^ win. 

The Knights came within an 
eyelash of jwlling rff one of tte 
seastm's major upsets. After a - 
pme-lor^ uphill struggle, tl» 
Knights pulled within one point 
to the cloBing mimite. The 
Ca valine failed to connect on 
two aw and one situations in the 

itad aKWds, but Kellam couW 
mA emae vf with the deciding 

priMVW A«o« m»«f *"• 
murti clo»- with an 



Purdin 

Paden 

C alla n 

Zinno 

Daily 

Banta 

Gruber 

AAanuel 

Tucker 

Ellis 



Great Bridse 41 

Creekmore 

Luster 

Spell man 

Upton 

Roberts 

Lauman 

Bagdy 

Vincent 

Calhoun 

Wood 



6 

6 
3 



FT 
23 
4-4 
J-S- 



Thli Wnk 



20 



1-2 
0-0 
0-0 
3-4 
0-0 
0-0 
0-0 
13-21 



6 

4 
2 
S 

3 


2 


1 
17 



FT 

0-1 
1-2 
4-4 
2-5 
0-0 
0-0 
0-0 
00 
0-0 
0-0 
712 



3 
2 
4 
7 
2 


53 



T 
8 
5 

14 
8 


4 


2 

41 



TonlgM 



MIDGETS AT KINO'S GRANT 

Bullets 27 - Lakers 21 
Warriors IS — Couoars 22 
King's 16 — Lions I* 
Indians 21 - Tigers 30 
Knight, li - CeltlM a? 



WRESTLING — AAaury at Bayside; Cox 
at B. T. Washington; First Colonial at 
Norview; Kellam at Princess Anne. 

Friday 

BASKETBALL — Bayside at Maury; 
Lake Taylor at Cox; Kellam at First 
Colonial; Kempsville at Booker T. 
Washington; Norview at Princess Anne; 
Rym School at Tidewater Christian. 

WRESTLING — Kempsville at Norfolk 
Academy 

Saturday 

WRESTLING — Booker T Washington 
at Bayside; Cox at First Colonial; Kellam 
at Lake Taylor; Princess Anne tt 
Kempsville 



Princess Anne 1* 


15 6 


17- 


-53 


Great Bridge B 


15 8 


10- 


-41 


First Colonial S3 










G 


FT 


T 


Bowman 


1 


0-2 


2 


Butts 


3 


2-2 


8 


Doyle 





0-0 





Gainer 


10 


7-7 


27 


Harris 


4 


1-3 


9 


Lewis 


12 


2-6 


26 


McClannan 





0-0 





Falamone 





1-2 


1 


Spellman 


3 


3-6 


9 


Turner 





0-0 





Uzzle 





1-2 


1 


Woodies 





0-0 






.Tuesday 

BASKETBALL — First 
Bayside: Cox at Booker T. 
Kellam at Kempsville 



Colonial at 
Washington; 



Last Week's Results ^ 

BASKETBALL — Princess AnnetJ B. 
Washington 43 to;.yrincess Anne 



33 17-30 83 



Lake Taylor 7* 

Graves 
Harper 
Lewis 
'Barden 
Trowel I 
Johnson . 
Baker 
Fields 

First Colonial 
Lake Taylor 

Norview M 

Whisenton 

Hughes 

Dawson 

Ware 

McNair 

Young 



BaysHto 75 

GoHigan 

Gross 

Fletcher 

Osborne 

Harold 

Coles 

Duke 

Foskey 



6 

12 
6 
5 

1 



FT 

4-7 
2-2 
7-9 
2-2 
1-2 
1-2 

1-3 
U-l 



24 

18 



26 
13 

17 



T 

28 

14 

17 

4 

5 

1 

1 
U 
70 



1628 
16 30 — 83 
10 25 — 70 



Kellam 62; Princess Anne S3 Great Bridge 
t\. First Colonial »3 Lake Taylor 70; 
Granby 90 First Colonial 68; Kempsville 7» 
Cox 6«; Granby 72 Kempsville 59; Norview 
80 Bayside 75; Norview 92 Kellam 68; 
Alliance Christian 62 Tidewater Christian 
50 

WRESTLING — Lake Taylor 28 Bayside 
21; Cox 56 AAaurv 6; First Colonial « 
Norfolk Catholic 15; Princess Anne 52 
Oranby 9; Kempsville 32 Kellam 15; 
ket|am 33 Western Branch 18. 



RecraMlM Basketball 
MIDGETS AT ALANTON 

Celtics 17 - Rams 23 
Cooke "A" 24 - Cooke "B" 31 
Wildcats 24 — Squires 13 
Burfersi 18 — Airedales 16 
Bulldogs 27 — Mariners 23 
MIDGETS AT BROOKWOOO 
Eagles 30 - Courthouse Knights 20 
Comets 25 — Creeds Squires 28 
Plaza Knights 29 — Celtics 25 
Bullets 32 — Plaza Squires 31 
Cavaliers 29 - Cbugars 25 
MIDGETS AT KEMPS LANDING - 
Yellow Jackets 27 — Stars 14 
Lakers 18 - Packers 6 
Redbirds 7 - Cougars 26 
Gabblers 25 - Tigers 34 
Indians 21 — Warriors 38 



MIDOETS AT NEWTOWN 
Spartons 5 - A P Bullets 38 
Knicks 18 - Royals 40 
Barons 18 — Falcons 20 
Lakers IS - Bullets 28 
Food A Rama 14 - Knights 35 
MIDGETS AT PEMBROKE MEADOWS 
Pacers 14 — Bucks 1* 
Hawks 7 - Supersonics 42 
Lakers 38 — Suns 6 -i 

Bulls 30 - Stars IS 
Blazers 5 - Wildcats 28 
MIDGETS AT POINT O'VIEW 
Larks 36 - Hawks 24 
Cubs 26 - Knicks 25 
Squires 19 - Warriors 28 
Lakers 28 - Bullets 23 
Cardinals 25 - Spurs IJ 
MIDGETS AT WINDSOR OAKS 
Rams II - Bullets 40 
Falcons 32 — Demons 19 
Vikings 9 - Cardinals 27 • 

Bruins 21 - Lakers 37 
INTERMEDIATE AT COX 
Hawks 36 - Rams B 30 
Iron Dukes 51 - Rams A 35 
Jets 42 - Pros 28 
Squires 24 - Lakers 28 
Bulldogs 19 - Mariners 54 
INTERMEDIATE AT KEMPSVILLE 
Rams 26 — Pacers 37 
Hawks S3 — Monarks 35 
Panthers 30 - Kemps Blue Devils 24 
Chiefs 21 - Kemps Braves 53 
KG. Blue Devils 40 - Wood. Braves 29 
INTERMEDIATE AT PLAZA 
Demons 61 — Knicks 8 
Celtics 39 - Cavaliers 29 
Bullets 31 - Lakers 30 
Plaza Knights 24 - Monarchs 42 
Falcons 28 — Court. Knights 2l' 
INTERMEDIATE AT PRINCESS ANNE 
S.P. Lions 26 — Thor. Lions 21 
Hi Jackers 20 - Chargers 27 
Knicks 23 - Lakers 18 
Go Trotters 42 - Seals 32 
Saints 36 - Chiefs 52 
INTERMEDIATE UNION KEMPSVILLE 
Wood. Squir«s 45 - Arrow. Lakers 25 
Bucks 22 — Larkspur Larks 34 
Eagles ST - Chargers 8 
Plaza Lakers 22 - Steelers 24 
Plaza Squires 19 - Ducks 18 
JUNIOR AMERICAN BAYSIDE ItR. 
Squires 28 - Tar Heels 68 ' 

Celtics 30 - Arrow. Lakers 64 
OS. Lakers 71 - Bulls 50 
JUNIOR NATIONAL BAYSIDE JR. 
Cavaliers 42 — Squires 45 
Larks 33 - Bucks 35 
Royals 41 - fied Devils 55 
JliNIOR AMERICAN 
Bies 33 - Tigers 36 
Chiefs 33 - Hawks 39 
l«rs - Trolans 4« 



. Beach grapplers continued to dominate 
all coniere" In action last week. Local 
teams rolled to an easy 4-1 mark apinst 
outside compitition. Bayside was the only 
city team to stumble during the week. 
Beachwres tiers havecompiled an imposing 
18-4-2 ma r k Ttgainst outsiders: 

In action Saturday night Cox blasted 
Maury 53-6; Princess Anne beat Granby ' 
52-9; Kellam rolled over Western Branch 
33-18; and Bayside fell to Lake Taylor 28- 
21. 

Cox improved their seasonal record to 
8-0 and extended their unbeaten streak to 
36 straight dual matches against an 
outmanned Maury club. The Falcons 
showed off their state championship iarm 
in taking the first 11 bouts of the match. 
Maury averted a whitewash scoring a pin 
in the final bout of the night. 

COX'S TRIO of state champions 
continued their fine showings. Mike 
Newbern (126-pound) was the most 
imtx'essive of the group registering a pin 
at 3:19 of the second period. Chris 
Conkwright, Jim Gaudreau and Newbern 
have combined tar a 33-0 record this 
season. 

Princess Anne pushed their record 
back over .500 with their easy win d over 
f(n-mer wrestling powerhouseGranby. The 
Comets remained true to a season long 
pattern forfeiting six bouts in the match. 
The Cavaliers record is now 4-3. 

Princess Anne^s d^ending 98-pound 
state champ Ken Nowlin faced one of his 



sUffest challenges of the year in Granby's 
Terry Shriver. Nowlin escaped with an 8-5 
win. The only blemish on Nowlin's record 
this year is a draw with' Cox's Bob 
Battalio. 

The Cavaliers have shown a recent 
weakn e ss in th e upper-wei g hts, bu t " 
G'ranby failed to take advantage of 
Princess Anne's shortcoming. The Comets 
fcrfeited the last four bouts of the match. 

KKLLAM REBOUNDED strong from 
an earlier losstwith a convincing victory 
over Southeastern District rival Western 
Branch. The Knights, in winnii^ their 
fourth dual match in their last five, 
improved their record to 5-3. 

Aldolphus Haynes and Charles Skipper 
continued their consistent performances. 
Haynes scored a 9-3 decision in a 145-pound 
bout, while Skipper ( IBS-pound) registered 
a pin at 3:58 of the second period, Gene 
Bunn. undefeated in lS5-pound action since 
returning to the mats at the start of 
January, was not tMted winning his bout 
via a forfeit. 

Lake Taylor kept Bayside in their 
slump with the close win. The Titans 
clinched the triumph with a pin in the final 
bout of the match. The Marlins have now 
lost four straight dual matches as their 
record has dipped to 2-6. 

Bayside's Brian Johnson continued his 
imfroved wrestjing pining a 7-3 decisiwi. 
For Johnson, it was his thrid straight 185- 
pound victory. Merlin Clarence Billups 
roistered the week's biggat upset with a 



5-3 l5S-pound decision over Titan Timmy* 
Vaughn. 

KEMP8VILI-E SNAPPED Kellam's 
three match win streak with a convincing . 
^2"^ trluTiph Friday nig ht The Chief s •• 
tdM( tlie rCfltseven bouts~^lhe matcii inT 
rolling to a comfortable early lead, and '^ 
then withstood a late Kellam clnrge. T; 
Kempsville is now 5-1-2. ^ 

Mark Rimarskl continues to give the '. 
Chiefs a boost in the heavyweight claia 
grabbing a 5-1 win over Geas%e Irby; 
Knights Bunn, Haynes and Skipper aH ; 
reg^tered decisions in their bouts^ Bund •' 
was the most imin'essive of the trio with a ;; 
19-5 win, ' •• 

First Colonial outclassed Norfolk !: 
Catholic 45-15 on Jan. 16, The Patriots hav4 - 
now won three straight dual matches and 
have a 5-3 record. Expected to have an off 
year, FirstColcmial has rallied behind their . 
strength in the middle weights. Against the \ 
Crusaders, the Patriots put together a six- 1 
bout winning streak from 132 pounds to IBS ^ 
pounds. t 

Freeman Gregg remains the class of • 
the 138-pounddivision scoring his eighth win ! 
of the season without a wfeat. It took 
Gregg only one minute to dispose of his 
latest challenger, 

Ed Smith and Jerry Pontes also 
continued their consistent efforts fm- the 
Patriots, both registering wins. Smith was 
the most impressive pinning his opponent 
with only two seconds left in the match. 



VIRGINIA 
BEACH 
ENGRAVING & 
TROPHY CO. 

"hopMn. Hmiims. Awada 

C^^ A. Montgomery, 

Pmidcirt 

.49MHoAMdR4.Sm^C •# 





X 



LOCAL 
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AND 






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MAPS 



VS 271 - Salt Wattr Sport FIsliIng and Boating In Vlrglnt*— $6.40 
VF 171 - Fresh Water FIjfjIng amJ Humtfig In Virginia— se.40 
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NS 471 - Salt Water Sport Fisliing and Bo*Mriig*»n Nortli Carolina- »6.40 

N 1573 - Norfolk and Vicinity Str»»t Map— »4.47 p 

(AUPrtces Subject To Virpnk Met Tax) 

DIstribtttMl By 

JtrroM W/Briiicli 

P.O. BOX 1001 I 

CHESAPEAKE VA. 23320 



3-PIECE DRUM SET 




S^ 



BEGINNER DRUM SET 

Includes Drum Sticks, Brushes, 
Cjfmbals 

Retail: $159.50 



Sale '9995 



BASS GUITAR 



m 



Retail 
SALE 



$149.95 
$6495 



•^^ 



AMPLIFIERS as Low as 49^ 

ACOUSTIC GUITAR SALE still In Progress 
_„ Savm Up To 50% 

fov«r onm • hundrmd to ehoosm from) 

Mason Music 

853 E. LinLE CREEK RD. 
-NORFOLK- 5B34513 ' 



Layaways 

All Chorgm 

Cords Aeempfmd 




mmif^mmi 



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mmm 



Page 6— The Sun— Wednesday, January 23, 1974 



sun Dim 



liffcStylcs 



Bi^ioes 




MRS. SMITH 

Smith-Thorpe 

Bethann Theresa Thorpe wa 
wed to John Anthony Smith. 
Saturday at LeRies Unite4 
Methodist Church. 

The bride is the daughter otf 
Mr. and Mrs. Leslie F. Thorpe 
of Virginia Beach. The 
bridegroom is the son of Mr. 



MR. STILLO.MISS 
MII.KS 

and Mrs. John Albert Smith of 
Silver Spring, Md. 

Lynda Vesely was maid of 
honor. Bridesmaids were 
Valerie Clarke, Sherry Figart 
and Donna Garafalo. Jackie 
Garafalo was flower girl. 

Les J. Thorpe was best man. 
Ushers were David Lively, 
Wayne Daly and Robert 



NEW TO VIRGINIA BEACH 

The Welcome Wagon Club is a social organization that 
wants to help newcomers meet new people, and be- 
come acquainted with the area. Our many activities 
should interest you! For more information call 481- 
6862 or 486-3398 



WN ( (\ |( n|<(,\\|/ \||i)\ iih' ( III X( H 



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Complete Permanent Woves $6.95 to $19.95 

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Haircut..... •• $2.75 

^ No Appointment Necessary- Just Come In 
DAILY - 9 'til 6 THURS. - 9 'til 9 



Hilltop Pt»a Shopping Center 
LMklfl Rd. Next to Safeway 
Phone: 428-9897 
Va. Beach 



5118 Va. Beach "Ivd. 
Across from GEX 
Phone: 497-9769 
Va. Boach 



1734 E. 

Little Creek Rd. 
Next to Zayres 
Phone: 588-9093 
Norfolk 



AMERICAN TV 

Saving All of Tidewater for 18 Years 

SAME DAY SERVICE 

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m 



MRS. KELLEY 

Thorpe. Michael Thorpe was 
junior usher and Paul Thorpe 
was ring bearer. 

The couple will reside in 
Virginia Beach. 

Stiflo engagement 

Mr. and Mrs. Jose[^ Stillo of 
Virginia Beach announce the 
engagement of their son, 
Jeffery Robert Stillo of Sodus 
Point, N.Y., to Constance 
k Marjori6 Milks, daughter of Dr. 
and Mrs. Richard V. Milks of 
Sodus Point, N.Y. 

Mr. Stillo attended Kellam 
High School and Chesapeake 
College and is employed by the 
Dynalac Corp. of Rochester, 
N.Y. 

Miss Milks attended Webster 
School and graduated from 
Sodus Central High School. She 
is a student in the nursing 
program at the State University 
of New Yo-k, Caiiton, N.Y. 

No wedding date has been set. 

Kelley-Tanner 

St. Nicholas Church was the 
setting for the Dec. 29 wedding 
of Patricia Ann Tanner and 
Shaun Michael Kelley. 

The bride is the daughter of 
Mr. and Mrs. Anthony R. 
Tanner of Virginia Beach. The 
bridegroom is the son of Mr. 
and Mrs. William J. Mley Sr. 
of Virginia Beach. 

Mrs. Jerry Covahey was her 
cousin's, matron of honor. 
Bridesmaids were Erin Kelley 
and Janet Farley. 

William J. Kelley Jr. was his 
brother's l>est man. Tony and 
Neil Tanner were ushers and 
David Tanner was ring bearer. 

The couple will reside in 
Cleveland. 





i fewiEiw 




NEW PROGRAMS 

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to avoid the 9 to 5 job? 
Make it amount to some- 
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Exciting, challenging new 
programs available for you. 
Pleasant neighborhood 
car^r, car required, sales 
andconununity back^ound 
helpful, will train. CALL 
NOW for more information 
340-1234 or 340-2131 

Marilyn Mitchell 
FMdManagn 



MISvS JOHNSON 

Johnson engagement 

The Rev. and Mrs. M. 
Kimball Johnson of Virginia 
Beach announce the 
engagement of their daughter, 
Taveau Nonie Johnson, to Jean 
AUen D'Arcy, son of Mr. and 
^rs. James Alien D'Arcy of 
Camp Hill, Pa. 

The bride-to-be is a graduate 
of Lake Taylor High School and 
is attending Westhampton 
College trf the University of 
Richmond. Her fiance is a 
graduate of Trinity High School, 
Camp Hill, Pa., and the 
University of Richmond. He is a 
sales consultant for Provident 
Mutual Life Insurance Co. 

A July 20 wedding is planned 
in Ncnrfdk. 



Anderson- Wash burn 

Susan Bristow Washburn 
became the bride of Frederick 
William Anderson Dec. 29 at 
First Presbyterian Church. 

The bride is the daughter of 
Mr. and Mrs. Winslow Willard 
Washburn of Virginia Beach. 
The bridegroom is the son of 
Mr. and Mrs. William Simpson 
Anderson Jr. of Virginia Beach. 

Donna Lowery was her 
cousin's maid pi honor. 
Bridesmaids were Ann Miller, 
Julie Anderson, Jackie Wilson, 
Bonnie Farley and Holly 
Pittman. 

William Simpson Anderson 
Jr. was his schi's best man. 
Ushers were Jay Copeland, 
Charles Malbon, Allan Gibbs, 
John Wolfe, Lacy Robeson Jr., 
Roy Markert Jr. and Earl 
Tonkin. 

The couple will reside in 
Blackburg. 



For that personal touch 



LET ME 

ANSWER 

YOUR 

PHONE! 




CfHJ.-4a8-S600 

VIRGINIA BEACH— 2407 PKific Ava. 
Telephone Aiewering Service Co. 



SPECIALTIES 

Just Arrived 
New Shipment of 

HOLLOW GEODES 

with 

Pewtar Figures Inside 
A LSOKonab Wonder Stem 

Natural Sandstone Picture 
New JADE Items 

"Canned Oyster with Genuine Pearl" 

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^k . 486-7886 



Pianist Misha Dichter interprets 
Beethoven s genius in 5sona tas 



E 



If the audience which at- 
tended the concert sponsored by 
the Virginia Beach Friends of 
Music Friday night expected to 
hear an average all-Beethoven 
recital, they were wrong. 

Misha Dichter is known to 
vary his interpretation of any 
piece of music according to how 
well the piano is tuned, the 
mood he is in or for his own 
experimentation- 

His performance was fresh, 
exhilarating, subtle and ex- 
pressive. The program included 
five of Beethoven's 32 piano 
sonatas. 

They were "Sonata in C 
Minor, Opus 13 ("Pathetique"), 
"Sonata in G Major, Opus 14, 
No. 2", Sonata in E-flat Major, 
Opus 31, No. 3", "Sonata in F 
Major, Opus 10, No. 2", and 
"Sonatk in A Major, Opus 101". 

For his encore, he displayed 
his versatility with "Romance" 
by Schumann and the powerful 
"11th Hungarian Rhapsody in A 
minor" by Liszt. 

DICHTER WAS born in 
Shanghau of Polish descent. 



-Review 



P^itt Mitha Dichter performed Friday in a concert spon- 
sored by the Virgfnia Beach Friends of Music. Pianist Josheph 
Vaia will wind up the 1973-74 concert series at^3 p.m. March 
31 at the Lake Taylor High School auditoriui^l384 Kemps- 
ville Road, 



came to the U.S. at (fie age of 2, 
grew up on the West Coast, 
studied at UCLA and was given 
an honorary scholarship to 
Juilliard. In 1966 he won the 
silver medal in the famed 



Tchaikovsky Competition and 
has since been in constant 
demand. 

He has a splendid sense of 
tiiiiihg, technical proficiency, 
and is a master at the humorous 



development of the scherzo 
movements. 

We are fortunate that the 
great getiius of Beethoven was 
not lost in his {deafness, and that 
he could still compose works 
such as the "Sonata in A Majori 
Opus 101" under such a 
tremendous physical handicap, ' 
His music is immortal; par- 
tially due to magnificent young 
musicians such as Misha 
Dichter who are constantly 
giving them the breath of life. 
—Jo-Anna Smelser 



Students 'go foreigti' for a week 



Menus printed in foreign 
languages, announcements 
made in French, Spanish, 
German and Latin and foreign 
meals are all part of Foreign 
Language Week being observed 
this week at Kempsville Junior 
High School. 

The special week was a joint 
student-teacher project 
designed to increase student 
enrollment in foreign language 
study. 

First and second year 



French, Spanish, German and 
Latin students set \ip display 
cases in the school's halls, 
planned foreign meals for the 
cafeteria, decorated corners of 
the library with artifacts from 
different countries, decorated 
the halls With posters displaying 
foreign vocabulary and slang 
exiwessions, translated each 
day's school announcements 
into foreign languages to be 
broadcast over the public ad- 
dress system and enjoyed a 



slide presentation by Jacque4 
Solleau, an officer with the 
Armed Forces Staff College in 
Norfolk, as part of the foreign 
language week. 

Baird- Hunter, a French 
teacher at Kempsville Junior^ 
explained that the project was 
designed not only to increase 
student interest in foreign 
languages but also to give the 
students an opportunity to 
participate in a "fun" project., 



[ 




FOR THE FUTURE 



SURVIVORS BENEFITS will' 
be the subject td a slide 
program to be presented at 
today's luncheon meeting of the 
Dam Neck Officers Wives Qub, 
11:30 a.m. at the Jolly Ox 
Restaurant near Pembroke 
Mall. 

FAUSe'cAPE state PARK 

will be discussed by Lewis King 
of the Virginia Department of 
Parks and Recreation at 
tonight's meeting of the 
Tidewater Group-Sierra Clubjit 
7:30 in the Kempsville braiKh 
public library. 

ART AND PHOTOGRAPHY 

will be discussed by Frances L. 
Zip and Linda Fellers at the 
cocktail-dinner meeting of the 
Monticello Charter Chapter of 
the American Business 
Womans Assn., Thursday at 6 
p.m. at Browney's Restaurant, 
1872. E. Little Creek Road, 
Norfolk. 

A SILVER TEA in 

conjunction with the Navy 
Wives Clubs of America 



WIN you be 
Robbed? 

Burglarized? 
Raped?...worse? 
The IHN says yes! 

The FBI has said that every- 
one of us will be a victim of 
a crime in our lifetime. It 
may be burglary, robbery, a 
mugging, a rape... or worse. 

Now you can protect your 
home and your family frcm 
drug addicts, robt)ers and 
other intruders With FLASH- 
GUARD. This all-new burglar 
alarm system brings effective 
protection within the reach 
of everyone 

For a fraaion of the cost 
of good conventional, alarm 
systems, FLASHGUARD pro- 
tects every door and window 
through which an intruder 
might enter your home. 
FLASHGUARD can also pro- 
vide inoKpensive fire alarm 
IM'otection. 

For all the (tetails, call or write: 



1615 PACIFIC AVE. 
VIRGINIA BEACH 

425-1776 



(NWCA) National Scholarship 
Month will be sponsored by 
NWCA Dam Neck No. 207 
Filday at 1 p.m. in the Fantail 
Room <rf the CPO Club at Dam 
Neck. Jean Lyles, secretary- 
treasurer of the National 
Foundation of Washington, 
D.C., will discuss the club's 
scholarship foundation. 

INSTALLATION (rf officers 
will be lidd at the 53rd annual 
installation meeting of the 
Engineers Club of Hampton 
Roads, Inc., Friday at the 
Admiralty Motel of Norfdk on 
North Military Highway. 
Cocktails will.be served at 7 
p.in., dinner at 8 p.m., with 
installation of (tfficers at 9 p.m. 
and dancing to music by the 
Ray Ki[^r Band beginning at 
9:30 p.m. Reservations may be 
made by calling 428-6794 or 855- 
2063. 

A CHILDREN'S FILM in the 

Chrysler Museum at Norfolk 
film series for children, "The 
Never, Never Princess," will be 
shown Saturday atlO:30 a.m. at 
the museum, Olney Road and 
Mowbray Arch. Ticket 
information may be obtained 
from the museum at 622-1211. 

CONTEMPORARY MUSIC 

will be performed by the 
Norfolk Chamber Consort 
Sunday at3 p.m. at the Chrysler 
Museum auditorium, Olney 
Road and Mowbray Arch, 
Norfolk. The program, 
"Encounter: New Music — 
ni," is the consort's third 
annual program of 

contemporary music. Tickets, 
available at the door, are $2.50 
general admission, $1.50 for 
muse|iun members and $1 for 
military personnel and 
students. 

'"^lANSCENDENTAL MED- 
I'^TION will be explain- 
ed in two introductory 
lectures sponsored by the 
International Meditation 
Society Tuesday and Jan. 31 at 
7:30 p.m. at Friends Meeting 
House, 1537 Laskin Road. Both 
lectures are offered free to the 
public. 

PRACTICAL BUSINESS 

courses will be offered by the 
Old Dominion University 
Institute of Management 
beginnii^ Monday. I^e 14 non- 
credit courses will cover 
educational needs . of 
management personnel. 
RegBtration information may 
be obtained from Richard L. 
Drury, director, ODU Institute 



of Management, at 489-8000, ext. 
239. 



FOR THE RECORD 




tiAlR FASHIONS 
Heading into shorter , sheker h&irstyles. 
However you want to bring yours up to 
date... A clipt a trim, or an upsweep... 
We Otn Put You In Shape. 

•ITT Va.awc>llN. 



TERRARIUMS were 
discussed by Randy Jackson 
VPI extension agent, at the 
January meeting of the Kinstoi;i 
Garden Club. In af^reciation 
, for his talk, the club donated a 
check to Mr. Jackson's favwite 
charity, the local Society for the 
Prevention of Cruelty to 
Animals. 

A 35-POUND GAVEL was 

presented to Stanley Senter of 
Virginia Beach when he was 
installed recently as worshipful 
master for 1974 of the Charles T. 
Morton Masonic Lodge 2^, 
Norfolk. Other (rff icers installed 
are: senior warden, Amos G. 
Shq)pard; junior warden, John 
c; Shirley Jr. ; secretary, Fred 
J. Schmoele; treasurer, C. 
Dodson Morrisette; senior 
deacon, John J. Whalen Jr.; 
junior deacon, William B. 
Oshmiln, and chaplain, William 
R. Johnson. 

BILL GILLILAND was 

installed as president of local 
branch 2819 of the National 
Assn. of Letter Carriers 
recently at the Ft. Story 
Officers Club. Other officers 
installed < are: vice-{H'esident, 
Chuck O'Brien; secretary, 
Irene Martin, and treasurer, 
Vance A|^le. 

CHRISTMAS HAPPINESS 

was brought to the Shore Drive 
Convalescent Home when 
members <A the Chesopeian 
Colony Garden Club presented 
gifts to patients at the home. 
Mrs. David L. Freeman, the 
club's coordinator of garden 
therapy and volunteer service, 
repmled on the club's donation 
at the January meeting. Mrs. 
Arthur H. Gallagher presented 
a conservation program on tree 
identification. 

■niE FIRST business meeting 
(rf the year for the Tidewater 
International Astrologers Asai. 
was held Friday at Montgomery 
Ward's. Armond Levy 
presented the club's by-laws 
and constitution. 

"LEE, JACKSON, and Maury 
in Lexington" was the subject of 
a talk presented by Fairfax 
Bukeley at the recent meeting 
of the Pickett-Buchanan 
Chapter of the United 
Daughters of U»e Confederacy. 

BICENTENNIAL cele- 
brations for the area were 
discussed ^ Glenn A. Scott, 
chairman ^ the Tidewater 
BicenteniTial Committee, at 
Thursday's meeting of the 
Adam Thoroughgood Chapter of 



the Dau^ters of the American ~ 
Revolution. 

"YOUR HEART AND YOU'* 

was the subject of a program 
{H'esented by John Fay, i ' 
coronary technician with th<i 
Virginia Beach Emergency 
Ctn-onary Care Program, at 
Tuesday's meeting of the^ 
Lighthouse Chapter of the*^ 
American Business Womans 
Assn. 



NEW OFFICERS of the 
Chesapeake Beach Volunteei*' 
Fire and Rescue Dept. were 
installed recently. They are: 
fire chief, William R. Beniker; 
deputy chief, Clifford J, 
Nicholas; assistant chief, Johil 
F. Johnson; hose captain, 
Edward J. Mwningstar; rescue 
captain, Josei^ V. MiskiU; 
captain general, Samuel A. 
Burke; president, John B. Fay; 
vice-president, Benjamin D.~ 
Mace; chaplain, John K." 
Dunning; treasurer, William E. _ 
Watson; secretary, Andrew R. 
Kelly, and floor representative, 
Jay L. Sethman. 

THE LONDON BRIDGE 

Volunteer Fire Dept. installed 
new (rfficers Jan. 5. Judge 
Philip Russo installed the 
fdlowing officers: {M-esident, 
Donald Gregory; vice- 
president, Hack Campbell; 
secretary, Quentin J. Zeller; 
treasurer, Dexter McCanty; 
chief, Ted Hayunga; deputy 
chief, Cliff Lowder; fi«t 
assistant chief, James 
Dameron, and second assistant 
chief, L. J. "Red" Harris. Chief 
Hayunga installed the 
appointed officers who are: fire 
captain, I. B. George III; fire 
lieutenants, James Warren and .. 
David Compton; rescue 
captain, Quenten Zeller, and 
rescue lieutenant, Charles 
Paulus. '^ 

THE LADIES' AUXILIARY 

to the Princess Anne Lodge No. 
8 Fraternal Order of Police 
recently installed 1974 rfficere. 
They are : president, Frances 
Silva; immediate past 
president, Shirley Pritchard; - 
vice-president, Mary Butler; 
recording secretary, Gloria • 
McAlea; corresponding 
secretary, Jerri Aydlette; 
treasurer, Nancy Helmer; 
conductress, Lucille Pace; 
guard, Pat White, and chaplain, 
Roxanne Adams. Rachel 
Hughes, April Sciwtino and 
Judy Spellman were elected 
trustees. 

Items may be submitted to 
Sun Dial by maU. Please mail your 
notice to Sun Dial, Virginia Beach \ 
Sun, 138 Rosemont Road, Vir- 
ginia Beach, Va. 2345Z Deadline 
Is noon Friday prior to the week 
of /mblicetion. 



34044W 




(it; 



» 425-9335 



•5" 

ORIENTAL ARTS & CURIOS 

HOURS: le a.in. TO 5:00 p.Bi. 
CLO^D SUN. k HON. 

716 FIRST COLUNIAI, 

HILLTOP WKST ^ 



K 



^IgUl 



The Sun-Wednesday, January 23, 1974rP«9e 7 



Police want to illuminate 
prc'dawn walkers, bikers 



Police have launched a campaign of strict enforcement 
of bicycle and pedestrian safety eegulations as Daylight 
Savings Time becomes effective year-round. 

Traffic Bureau Director C. H. Payne said the move is to 
protect students who will be travelling to school in 
darkness ^of the pre-dawn hours. He said, "We are 
beginning enforcement with a warning period before 
issuing summons to violators to give students a chance to 
get their bicycles properly illummated. We would also like 
to stress that cyclists and pedestrians alike obey rules of 
the road and use extreme caution." 

Capt. Payne said students will be informed of the safety 
regulations and steps recommended to assist motorists to 
see them in the darkness. This will be carried out through 
programs at the various schools of the city. 



CAPT. PAYNE added, "We recommend not only do 
they equip bicycles with white lights in front and red 
reflectors in the rear, but that they wear reflective tape on 
their outer clothing so they are visible to motorists. These 
materials are available at any bicycle sales and service 
stores." 

Capt. Payne pointed out handbooks containing safety 
rules and regulations, as well as guidelines, may be ob- 
tained at the trafflc bureau in police headquarters. 

There have been no reports of student m juries thus far, 
Capt. Payne added, but there have been con\plaints from 
motorists of students not being visible alot^ the road- 
sides. He also pointed out of the largest number of 
students concerned are attending high schools and junior 
high schools. 



Motorists could get bang out of gasoline 



In these days of longer 
distances between opei;! gas 
stations, motorists may be 
unknowingly endangering their 
lives by carrying spare cans of 
gasoline in their cars. 

Running out of gasoline is less 
dangerous than keeping a spare 
can of gasoline in the car trunk, 
warns John T. Hanna, director 
of the state's highway safety 
division. Mr. Hanna added that 
one of the safest ways to 
transport gasoline is in the gas 
lank of the car. 

An explosion caused by one 
gallon of gasoline is equivalent 
to 14 sticks of dynamite ex- 
ploding, Mr. Hanna said. 

Expanding gasoline vapors 
can force open the seams of 
unvented containers, allowing 
the gas to leak out. A spark 



from the car's ignition, elec- 
trical system, or a short in the 
brake lights could triggn* a 
dangerous gasoline explosion. 

VENTED SAFETY con- 
tainers can also leak dangerous 
fumes. The gasoline vapor 
expands to fill the empty 
spaces, then escapes through 
the vents. 

If motorists feel they must 
carry gasoline in a vehicle, the 
Virginia Fire Marshals Office 
recommends approved safety 
containers that are vapor tight. 

Gasoline should never be 
storedjn glass jugs, discarded 
bleach bottles or other 
makeshift containers. Any 
container for gasoline should 
never be filled completely. 



Leaving an "empty space for 

gasoline expansion prevents 

stress on the container's seams. 

Tests have shown that emn a 



so-called "safety" can placed in 
the trunk of a car with the motor 
running could explode within 20 
minutes. 



Debaters take trophy 



Those smiles on the faces of 
First Colonial High School's 
debate team are caused by yielr 
sweep of the invitational debate 
tournament held recently in 
Hopewell. 

The team beat out 25 other 
high schools to take the first 
place school award trophy and 
the first place team award for 
affirmative arguments. The 
team also won the second place 



trophy for negative arguments. 

The debate team also ac- 
cumulated four individual 
honors. Debaters honored are 
Charlie Pittman, first af- 
firmative;- Chris Llndsey, 
second affirmative; and Blake 
Manuel and Brad Kaune, 
second negative (tie). 

First Colonial's debate team 
is coached by Mary Sue 
Cronimelln, English and speech 
teacher. 



'<r'/f/fi 




Pretty parfaits m^y be made weJl ahead of 
serving time. 

Easy party parfaits 
and deliciously pretty 



tJlanrorous as all, got out, these 
pretty parfaits may be made well- 
ahead of serving time. If you 
don't have parfait glasses, use 
any glasses that will ri»veal the 
contiastmg layers of whipped 
cream and loffet -flavored choc- 



olate pudding— the latter stud- 
ded with rcMsted diced almonds 
and bits of maraschino cherries. 
For a festive garnish, top each 
serving with more of the crunc hy 
almonds, and a bright red cherry. '. 



Jamaican Almond Parfaits 

1 package (4 02.) chocolate 17 <up din>(l almonds. 



pudding and pie filling 
1 labk'Spoon instant loffee 

powder 
!?(iips milk 

1 '1 teaspoon rum extrai I 
1 4 cup C|uarU-red maraschinc 

cherries 



roasted 

1/2 pint whipping cream 

1/4 cup .sugar 

1/4 teaspoon almond extract 
Roast(>d diced almonds 
Maraschino cherries with 
• stems '<opti()n4ili ''■ 



Combine pudding mix, c otfe'e and milk in a sauc epan. Cook, stirring 
( onsMnlly, until ihic kened Cool, then stir in rum exirac t, c hemes and 
almniids. Chill. Whip cream with sugar and almond extract until stiff. 
Layer pudding mixture and whipped (r<>am alternately into d partait 
glass's. Garnish with a sprinkling of almonds, and if you \v\s\^, a slem- 
med cherry. Chill well before serving ■■-^"" ' *"* 

,M<\ki's (1 servings. 




Cherrv cobbler may be made wfth low-fat drop 
biscuits. 

Traditional cobblers 
are updated for health 



Cobblers are a tradition- 
al American dessert similar 
to a deep-dish fruit pie. 
Instead of the pastry crust, 
however, cobblers are usu- 
ally topped by a rich bis- 
cuit dough. 

The origin of the word 
cobbler is unknown, but it 
may have come froni the 
expression to "cobble up," 
that is, to put together 
(iuickly, since these desserts 
are easy to make. Cobblers 
can be made with any num- 
ber of fruits, but Cherry 
/Hobbier is a particular 
favorite. 

This easy modern-day 
version of Cherry Cobbler 
starts with canned red sour 
pitted cherries, the syrup 
from which is thickened 
and flavflted withialmond. 
• 'lt>pp«Hi with drop biscuits 
innde with skim milk and 
Fleisc.bmann'sCorn Oil Mar- 
garine, this recipe is suitable 
for low-saturated fat menus. 
Allhoygh most veBctabreoiTs 
are beneficial in a lowsalu- 
falcd fat diet, scientific 
studies over a ten year period 
•how fhal none is more ef- 
fective than corn oil in low- 
eriim blood ch<»l«l*T«»l. 



Enjoy the old-fashioned 
goodness of this delicious 
Cherry Cobbler made with 
modern ingredients geared 
to good health. 

CHERRY COBBLER 
2 cans (1 pound 14-ounee 
each^ red sour pitted ' 
cherries 
1 cup firmly packed • 

brown sugar 
1 tbsp. cornstarch 
1/4 tsp. almond extract 
1 cup unsifted flour 

1 tbsp. suga^ 

2 tsp. baking powder 
1/4 top. salt 

3 tbsp. Fleischmann's 

ftfargarine 
1/2 cup skim miik 

Drain fruit, rwerving 1/2 
cup- syrup. Combine brown 
sugar, cornstarch and re- 
served syrup; add fruit. Cook, 
rtirriflf , until «»«**«• starts 
to boil; add almond extract. 
Keep warm. 

Sift together flour, sugar, 
baking powder and salt. Cut 
fa margarine. Add skim milk, 
birring to moisten. Pouffruit 
mixture into 2-quurt caue- 
role. Drop topping by ^>oon- 
ftiU onto mixture. Bake a* 
4750F. for 20 minute, or 
until done. Makes Sieving 



SAVE TWICE AT VALU-FAIR-BUDGET S-T-R-E-T-C-H-l-N-G PRICES PLUS S & H GREEN STAMPS 1 





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fruits and vtgttabln. 

*Sptfdy chacii coihing ttrvico will) yow^Vohf, 
Foir chocli coihing courttiy cord. 



• • • • 



WE WELCOME 

FOOD 

STAMP 

SHOPPERS 



FREE TAKE HOME if RVICE TO ALL 
SURROUNDING AREAS WlfH GROCERY 
PURCHASES OF its 00 OR MORE' 



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CONVENIENT 

LOCATIONS 
TO SERVE YOU! 



VA. BEACH BLVD. AND KEMPSVILLE ROAD... 
INDIAN RIVER ROAD AND MILITARY HIGHWAY.... 

6621 MILITARY HIGHWAY.... 2512 LAFAYEHE BLVD 

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IN ADDITION TO OUR LOW PRICES 

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GRAPE JELLY 



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2 



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Jar 



39 



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ALL 
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This coupon redeemable at Valu Fair with grocery order of $7.50 or more. 
LIMIT - One per order. Expires midnight Jan. 30, 1974. 



ARROW PLASTIC 

TRASH BAGS 

FOR 20 GALLON CANS 



46 OZ. 
CAN Lii^ij 

ONE 



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This coupon redeemable at Valu Fair with grocery order of $7.50 or more. 
LIMIT ■ One par order. Expires midnight Jan. 30, 1974. 



ARGO 

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PACKED BY DEL MONTE 



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CANS 



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REDGLO 

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THIS coupon redeemable at Valu Fair with ^ocery order of $7.50 or more. > 
LIMIT - One pef ord«r. Expires mldhigftt Jan. 30. *74. 



^■MiMiMaMMIMaHii 



i^riMiaiiMttMiaaiiiteiHfeiii 



MttH^Ml 



Pagt 8--The Suf»-Wednesday, January li, !»''♦ 




Plaza volunteer f ir( 
honor 3 iii annual awards 




Base chief 
of utilities 

is female 



Mrs. Beatrice H. Pennington hows a position of 
..responsibility few would expect to be filled by a 
woman. She is the administrative officer of the 
public works department' at Little Creek Naval 
Amphibious Base. 

She directs activities which provide some $2.2 
million annually in engirfeering, maintenance, 
utility and transportation services on the base and 
is in charge of 340 skilled civil service craftsmen. 
The majority of services are devoted to distribution 
of utilities and maintenance of buildings. 

It is evident she enjoys her work. Mrs. 
Pennington says, "Hammering nails is something 
new for a woman. I find it very fascinating. I'm not 
tied to a desk like some women are. As a matter of 
fact, I'm accepted as just one of the men. I think it 

Should be that way. However, I do find that all the 
.privileges extended to a woman are given me, and I 
find this very gratifying. 

.. "I IJKK GOING into the shops and seeing what 
makes the department work. Knowing how it 

.^operates is fascinating, and I haven't found one 
department more interesting than another." 

A large percentage of public works resources 
are used in continual maintenance of buildings on 
ihe base. Mrs. Pennington says, "We still have 
many old buildings in need of repairs. T^y're of 
ancient vintage. I'm glad to see new quartwS being 
built for the men." 

Shortages from the energy crisis are affecting 
services provided by Ihe public works department, 

' threatening the free bus service provided 
Ihroughout the base and to the Portsmouth Naval 
Hospital. 

j^ MRS. PRNNINGffiff says, '"'ihe energy cfigtff" 

' affects our day-to-day operations because of 

-increased costs and smaller supplies. Utility bills 
lake a big bite out of our budget . Every time we go 

"" iip in utility costs, we're forced to go dowh in 

, maintenance and transportation services. It could 
eventually result in halting transportation 
services." 

Mrs. Pennington says. "We have a very active 
.utilities conservation program. We've reduced 

temperatures of occupied buildings to 65 degrees 
and cut heal off entirely in some warehouses. We've 
also invited civilians to use Ihe free bus service, 
which previously was offered only lo military 
personnel, to conserve gasoline." She added 
formation of motor pools is being encouraged for 
ihose who trfivet to and frt>m the amphibtt^s base 
daily. 

' "WK \RK STUDYING converting the utility 
plant from oil lo coal in manufacturing steam." 
Mrs. Pennington continued, "and it looks goodYrom 
Ihe aspect of saving money as well as fuel oil." She 
pointed out steam is used for healing buildings on 
Ihe base and operation of some equipment. 

The central steam generating plant produces 
270.000 pounds of steam hourly, which is piped 
throughout the base ih a 21 -mile steam distribution 
system. 

Many have questioned why Ihe huge steam pip^ 
were craistrucled in angular patterns at intervals 
rather Than in a continuous straight line. Mrs. 
Pennington says this was done to reduce the steam 
'^^ressure lo avoid damaging machinery using 
steam. , 



James Hundley, John 
Fremau and Bunky Johnson 
wore honored Saturday night by 
their fellow members of the 
Plaza Volunteer Fire Depart- 
ment and Rescue Squad. 

Mr. Hundley was named 
fireman of the year, Mr. 
Fremau received the rescue 
squadsman of the year award 
and Mr. Johnsonwas honored as 
junior squadsman of the year. 

Each of the awards was based 
on individual devotion to 
protection of citizens of the 



community, outstanding ser- 
vice to their units and 
promoting cooperation within 
the organization. Mike Boyd, 
awards committee chairman, 
presoited the awards followtng 
the iMtallation of incoming 
offlcers during the unit's annual 
banquet dance. 

City Fire Chief E.B. "Bubba" 
Bayne, in administering oaths 
of office to the new officers, 
praiaed the voluntews^tor their 
devotion to resid^Us J^the 



Jaycees looking 
for* first citizen' 



\ 



Tlie Virginia Beach Jaycees 
are conducting their annual 
search for the First Citizen of 
Virginia Beach. 

The Jaycees are now ac- 
cepting nominations for the 
First Citizen award, which must 
be submitted to Terry Huffman, 
chairman of the First Gtizen 
committee, by Feb. 20. 

The Vhrginia Beach resident 
chosen as the First Citizen will 
be selected on the btasis of his or 
her efforts lo improve any facet 
of life in the city in 1973. 
Although emphasis will be 
placed on service given last 
year, community efforts during 
previous years ^ill also be 
considered. There are no age. 



sex or other restrictions for 
nominations. 

ANY INDIVIDUAL or 

organization may submit 
nominations, accompanied by 
supporting documents if 
possible, to Terry Huffman, 
First Citizen Committee, 4629 
Bamaby Court, Virginia Beach, 
Va. 23455. 

A selection committee will 
review all nominations and 
choose the First Citizen. The 
award recipient will be in- 
formed of the choice in a sur- 
prise announcement sometime 
at the end of February. 

The First Citizen award will 
be presented during an awards 
banquet in March. 



Entries sought for 
best 'single' parent 



The Tidewater Chapter of 
Parents Without Partners 
(PWP) is searching for the 
outstanding "Single Parent" in 
the area. The award is being 
given in recognition of the 
difficulties involved in raising 
children in a one-parent family. 

The public is invited to submit 
entries on behalf of any 
"single" parent in the 
Tidewater area. The nominee 
need not be a PWP member. 
The "Single Parent" award 
winnefwtU^ receive a plaque 
and $100 at a dinner-dance given 
by PWP. The local winner will 



automatically be a finalist in 
the 25th International Out- 
standing Single Parent of the 
Year conK^titionln July. 

Entry forms are available 
upon request from PWP, P.O., 
Box 9706, Norfolk, 23505 or by 
calling 625-0561. Essay style 
entries will also be accepted, 
but all entries must be sub- 
mitted l)efore Feb. 20. 

PWP is an international, non- 
profit and non-sectarian 
educational organization 
devoted to the welfare and 
interests of "single" parents 
and their children. 



community and cooperation 
with other fire departments of 
the city. 

Newly elected officers of the 
Plaza volunteer organizatk>n 
are James Hundley, [xresident; 
Billy Day, fh-st vice-president; 
William Batten, second vice- 
prerident; William Richards, 
secretary; John Small, 
treasurer Robert Rumens, 
diief; Gerald Perkins, deputy 
diief, John Fremau, rescue 
squad capt.; and, Burton 
Witham Jr., rescue lieutenant. 



VIRGINIA: IN THE 
CLERK'S OFFICE OF THE 

ciRCurr COURT of the 

CITY OF VIRGINIA 
BEACH, ON THE 14tti DAY 
OF JANUARY, 1974. 

in Chancery 
No. C-74-52 

In re: Adoption of Baby Girl 

Minnie 

By: Thelma Lxwlse Chad- 

wick and Orin Earl Chad- 

wlck. Petitioners 

To: Ronald Eugene Minnie 

FAAAG Detachment 

West Long Beach, California 

ORDER 

This day came Theima 
Louise ChadwIcK and Orin 
Eari Chadwick, Petitioners, 
and represented that the 
oblect of this proceeding is to 
effect the adoption of the 
above named infant(s). Baby 
Girl Minnie, by Orin Eari 
Chadwick and Thelma 
Louise Chadwick, husband 
and wife, and affidavit 
having been made and filed 
that Ronald Eugene Minnie, 
a natural parent of said 
child(ren), is a non-resident 
of the State of Virginia, the 
last known post office ad- 
dress being: FMAG Detach- 
ment, West Long Beach, 
California. 

it is therefore Ordered that 
the said Ronald Eugene 
Minnie appear before this 
court within ten (10) days 
after publication of this 
Order and Indicate his-her 
attitude toward the proposed 
adoption, or otherwise do 
what is necessary to protect 
his interest in this matter. 



Jaycee Week proclaimed 
in Beach by Cromwell 



To recognize the civic and 
patriotic achievements of the 
Virginia Beach Jaycees, Mayor 
Robert B. Cromwell Jr. has 
proclaimed this week as Jaycee 
Week in Virginia Beach. 

The week observes the 
founding of the Jaycees in 1915 
when Ihe first civic group for 
young men was organized in St . 
Louis. 

Mayor Cromwell said the 
purpose of the week is to focus 
attention on the Jaycees and the 
work they are doing. 

Last year's projects included 
Jaycee involvement in 



Patriotism Day, the Tidewater 
Soapbox Derpy, the East Cast 
Surfing Championships, ^ple 
Butter Week, Toys for Tots, 
Cancer Bike-a-Thon, First 
Citizen Award. Outstanding 
Young Ma n A ward. Outstanding 
"Young Educator AWard, Out- 
standing Young Law Eitforce- 
ment Officer Award, Helping 
Hands for Ihe Handicapped, 
Dribble and Shoot Contest. 
Model Airplane Contest, 
Project Santa at Central State 
Hospital, Meet the Candidates, 
Vietnam Memorial and the 
Haunted House project. 



itl 



LECALS 



VlRGINtA: IN THE 
CLERK'S OFFICE OF THE 
CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 
CITY OF VIRGINIA 
. BEACH, ON THE 15th DAY 
OF JANUARY, 1974. 

In Chancery 
N0.17116-A 

In re: Adoption of Daniel 

Jasen Brandt 

By: Leroy Carl Brandt & 

Dorothy Louise Brandt, 

Petitioners 

To: John Berglund 

831 W. Morgan 

Raleigh, North Carolina 

ORDER 

This day came Leroy Carl 
Brandt and Dorothy Louise 
Brandt, Petitioners, and 
represented that the object of 
this proceeding is to effect 
the adoption of the j^wve 
named infant, Daniel jfi^en 

-.^Brandt, by Leroy Carl 
Brandt and Dorothy Louise 
Brandt, husband and wife, 
and affidavit having been 
made and filed that John 

""'berglund, a natural parent of 
said child/ is a non-resident 
of the State of Virginia, the 
last known post office ad 
dress being: 831 W. AAorgan, 
Raleigh, North Carolina. 

It is therefore Ordered that 
the said John Berglund 
appear before this Court 
. within ten (10) days after 
publication of this Order and 
indicate his attitude toward 
the proposed adoption, or 
otherwise do what is 
necessary to protect his 
interest in this matter. 

John V. Fentress, Clerk 
By: Sandra Hargrove, DC. 

Michael E. Bowerman, p.q. 
IS61 A Laskin Rd. 
Virginia Beach, VA 

123,30,2 6,13 4T 

VIRGINIA: IN THE 

CLERK'S OFFICE OF THE 
CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 

r — OF vTiromtA 

BEACH, ON THE 14 DAY OF 
JANUARY, 1974. 

In Chancery 
No C 74 25 

In re: AdoptkKi of Madeline 

Joy Shrcffves 

By: EOward Lee G*^m. 

Petitwners 

To; MiMft Ciiflwi Shreeves, 

* 

WaMMburg. Maryland 



ORDER 

This day came Edward Lee 
Guptill, Petitioner, and 
represented that the object of 
this proceeding is to effect 
the adoption of the above 
named infant, Madeline Joy 
Shreeves, by Edward Lee 
Guptill and affidavit having 
been made and filed that 
Robert Clifton ^hreeves, Jr., 
a natural parent of said child, 
is a non-resident of the State 
of Virginia, the last known 
post office address being: 
4263 58th Avenue, Bladen 
sburg, Maryland. 

It is therefore Ordered that 
the said Robert Clifton 
Shreeves, Jr. appear before 
this Court within ten (10) 
days after publication of this' 
Order and indicate his at- 
titude toward the proposed 
adoption, or otherwise do 
what is necessary to protect 
hjs interest in this matter. 

John V. Fentress, Clerk 
By: J. Curtis Fruit, D.C. 
Ralph D. Katherman, p.q. 
281 Independence Boulevard 
Virginia Beach, Virginia 
1 23,30,2 6, 13-4T 

VIRGINIA: IN THE 
CLERK'S OFFICE OF 
THE CIRCUIT COURT OF 
THE CITY OF VIRGINIA 
BEACH, ON THE 18th DAY 
OF JANUARY, 1974. 

In Chancery 
No. C-73-1480 

In re: Adoption of Patricia 

Louise Spivey 

By : Herbert Lee Gallop and 

Minnie Mae Foster Gallop, 

Petitioners 

To: James Floyd Spivey 

Box 179 

Ooltensh, Tennessee 37363 

ORDER 

This day came Herbert 
Lee Gallop and Minnie Mae 
Foster Gallop, ^Petitioners, 
and represented that the 
object of this proceeding Is 
to effect the adoption of the 
above named infant, 
Patricia Louise Spivey, by 
Herbert Lee Gallop and 
MHinte^Mae-poster tJatlop, 
husband and wile, and 
affidavit having been made 
and filed that James Floyd 
Spivey, a natural parent of 
said child, is a non resident 
of the Stale of Virginia, the 
last known post office 
address being : Box 179, 
Ooltensh, Tennessee 37363. 

It is therefore Ordered 
that the same James Floyd 
Spivey 4ppear before this 
Court within ien.(IOi days 
alter publication ^^ this 



Order and indicate his her 
at<tTtlide toward the 
proposed adoption, or 
otherwise do what is 
necessary to protect his 
interest in this matter. 

John V. Fentress, Clerk ' 
By: Sandra Hargrove, D.C. 

Janet B. Burt, p.q. 
1369 Laskin Road 
Virginia Beach, Virginia 
23451 

1-23,30,2 6, 13:4t_ 

LE6AL 
ADVERTISEMENT 

CITV of VIRGINIA 
BEACH, VIRGINIA CON 
STRUCTION OF 
BUILDINGS 

Sealed bids - will be 
received by the City of 
Virginia Beach, Virginia, 
Purchasing Agent, Room 352 
Administration Building, up 
to time of 2:00 P.M. Local 
Time on date of February 7, 
1974, and then at such time 
and place publicly opened 
and read aloud for the con 
struction of certain 
buildings: 

Bid Item NO. 2842 Picnic 
Group Shelters Five Units 
Mt. Trashmore Park Bid 
Item No. 2892 Bait and 
Tackle Shop Single Unit Mt. 
Trashmore Park Plans, 
Specifications, and Bid 
Forms may be obtained at no 
cost from Department of 
General Services, Room 301 
Administration Building, 
Municipal Center, Virginia 
Beach, Virginia, and such 
Plans, Specifications and Bid 
Forms are made a part of 
this advertisement by this 
reference. 

Bids for each bid item must 
be accompanied by a Cer- 
tified Check or Bank 
Cashier's Check, or ac 
ceptable Bid Bond in the 
amount of Five (5 percent) 
Percent of the Base Bid in the 
favor of City of Virginia 
Beach, Virginia, and no bid 
may be wittidrawn for a 
period of Thirty (30) Days 
^ter sctMduled closing time 
for racipt of bids. Successful 
-biddars «iAU tae ^aquirad to 
furnish a Payment and 
Performance Bond for One 
Hundred (100 percent) 
Percent of the contract 
amount. 

Bidders are /equi red under 
Title 54, Chapter 7, Code of 
Virginia, to diow evidence of 
certificate of registratkm. 
The bidder shall place on ttie 
outside of the envelope 
containing his bl$ and on his 
bid the folkM^ing notation: 

Registered Virginia 



0- 



Contractor No. Dated 
The City of Virginia Beach 
reserves the right to accept 
or reject any or all bids, to 
waive any formalities in the 
bidding and to dward any 
contract deemed to be in the 
best interest of. the City. 
These Projects are being 
financially assisted by 
Federal and State funds and 
relevent Federal and State 
requirements will apply. 
Project Funding: The 
Bureau of Outdoor 
Recreation, United States 
Department of Interior, The 
Virginia Commission of 
Outdoor Recreation, B.O.R. 
Project, No. 51 0dO77. 

Carrot! G. Clough, Pur- 
chasing Agent 

123JTL 

VIRGINIA: IN THE 
CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 
CITY OF VIRGINIA 
BEACH ON THE VTH 
DAY OF JANUARY, 1974 

Chancery Court 
Papers No. 1922 

RE: Estate of'ponald S. 
Taber, Deceased 

SHOW CAUSE AGAINST 
DISTRIBUTION 

It appearing that a report 
of the accounts of Robert 
Friend Boyd, Executor of 
the Estate of Donald S. 
Taber, Deceased, and of the 
debts and demands against 
his estate have been filed in 
the Clerk's Office, and that 
six months have elapsed 
since the qualification, on 
motion of the Executor it Is 
ORDERED that the 
creditors of, and all others 
interested in the estate do 
show cause. If any they 
can, on the 8th day of 
February, 1974, before this 
Court at its Courtroom, 
against the payment and 
delivery offthe Estate of 
Donald S. Taber, Deceased, 
to the distributees without 
requiring refunding bonds. 

It is furttier ORDERED 
that the foregoing portion of 
this order be published once 
a week^foT two successive 
weeks in the Virginia Beach 
Sun, a newspaper published 
in the City of Virginia 
Beach. 

John V. Fentress, Clerk 
By J Curtis Frott, DC. 

Boyd, Davis & Payne 

Attorneys at Law 

1240 Virginia National Bank 

Building 

Norfolk, Virginia 23510 

1 23,30« 



John V. Fentress, Oerk 
By: Sandra Hargrove D.C. 

Gerald Rubinger p.q. 
1397 Laskin Roa'U 
Virginta- Beach, Virginia 

1-23,20,2-6,13-4T 



NOTICE OF 
PUBLIC HEARING 

The Virginia Beach 
Board of Zoning Appeals 
will conduct a Public 
Hearing on Wednesday, 
February 6, 1974, at 7:30 
P.M. in the Municipal Court 
Building, upstairs court 
room. City Hall, Virginia 
Beach, Virginia. The 
following applications will 
appear on the agenda. 

1. Welch Industries, Inc. 
requests a variance of 20 
feet to a 5 foot setback off of 
Southern Boulevard and a 
varianceof 9feettoa 16 foot 
setback off of Dorset 
Avenue instead of 25 feet as 
required and to waive the 
required landscaping in 
these setbacks on Lots 4 
through 15, Lots 22 through 
40, Lots 14 and 15, and Lots 
34 through 40, Block 54 and 
55, Euclid Place, 5005 
Holland Road. Bayside 
Borough. 

2. Louis and Isabel G. 
Brenner request a variance 
of 20 feet to a 30 foot front 
yard setback instead of 50 
feet as required of Lot 3, 
Tract B, Section 3, Tract 
BC, Tract C, Section 1, 
Sandbridge Beach, 
Sandfiddler Road. Princess 
Arfne Boirough. 

'■ 3. Kitchin Corporation by 
E. T. Caton, Attorney and 
Secretary, requests a 
variance to allow a "0" 
front yard setback instead 
of 10 feet as requlred'Of Lot 
3, Block 63. Plat 3, Virginia 
Beach Development 
Company, 205 25th Street. 
Virginia Beach Borough. 

4. Kitchin Corporation by 
E. T. Caton, Attorney and 
Secretary, requests a 
variance to allow a "0" 
front setback instead oif 10 
feet as required off of 
Atlantic Avenue and the 
platted alley adjoining the 
southern property line of 
Lot 6, Block 63, Plat 3, 
.Virginia Beach 
Development Company, 
Atlantic Avenue and 26th 
Street. Virginia Beach 
Borough. 

5. George and June 
Constantino by E. T. Caton, 
Attorney, <^ request a 
variance to allow a "0" 
front yard setback instead 
of 10 feet as required and to 
allow no on si^^ parking 
spaces instead of i.5 Spaces 
as required of part of Lot 11, 
Block 52, Plat 2, Virginia 
Beach Development 
Company, 2204 Atlantic 
Avenue. Virginia Beach 
Borough. 

6. William E. Ludwich 
requests a variance of 5 feet 
to a 5 foot side yard setback 
instead of 10 feet as 
required (eastern property 
line — detached garage) of 
Lot 73, Section 2, Lawson 
Forest, 5604 Sedgmoor 
Road. Bayside Borough. 

7. Edward E. Eggerson 
requests a variance of 2 feet 
to a 3 foot side yard setback 
(eastern property line) 
Instead of 5 feet as required 
and a varj^nce of 5 feet to a 
S foot rear yard setback 
instead of 10 f^et as 
required (detached gara^) 



of Lot 15, Block 15, Princess 
Anpt Plaza, 344S Ttrrazzo 
Trail. Lynnhavan Borough. 
8. Julian B. and Battle J. 
Jacobs by Robert C. 
Goodman, Jr., Attorney 
and Contract Owner, 
raquast a variance of 1.5 
fact to an 8.5 foot side yard 
setback (west property 
line) Instead of 10 feet a* 
required and a variance of 4 
feet to a 1 foot side yard'' 
setlMck (east property line) 
instead of 5 feat as required 
of Lot 10, Block 9, Section D, 
Cap* Henry Syndicate, 109 
83rd Street. Lynnhaven 
Borough. 

~ 9. Hacht Construction Co,, 
Inc. requests a variance of 
15 feet to a 15 foot setback 
from ZInia Court instead of 
30 feet as required of Lot 23, 
Block A, Cedar Hill, 918 
Strickland Boulevard. 
Kempsville Borough. 

10. Hecht Construction 
Co., Inc. requests a 
variance of 10 feet to a 30 
foot setback from 
Strickland Boulevard 
Instead of 30 feet as 
required of Lot 44, Block B, 
Cedar Hill, 5675 Chestnut 
Court . Kempsville 
Borough. 

11.' James K. Barnard 
requests a variance of 5 feet 

.to a 5 foot side yard setback 
(east property line) instead 
of 10 feet as required of Lot 
15, Subdivision 2 of a Part of 
Tracts 9 and 10, Oceana 
Gardens, 1536 Ocean 
Gardens. - Lynnhaven 
Borough. 

12. Lloyd H. Dixon 
requests a variance of 1 fo(^ 
to a 29 foot setback off of 
Basilica Circle instead of 30 
feet as required of Lot 1, 
Block L, Section 8, Part 1, 
Fairfield, Ben Bow Drive 
and Basilica Circle. 
Kempsville Borough. 

13. Pealedge P. Walker 
requests a variance of 5 feet 
to a 5 foot rear yard setback 
instead of 10 feet, as 
required (detached garage) 
of Lot 5, Block 70, Section 4, 
Princess Anne Plaza, 3441 
Sillna Drive. Lynnhaven- 
Borough. 

14. Joseph K. and 
Patricia A. Baldwin request 
a variance of 4 feet to a 6 
foot side yard setback 
(northern property line) 
instead of 10 feet as 
required and a variance of 4 
feet to a 6 foot rear yard 
setback Instead of 10 feet as 
required of Lot 82, Diamond 
Lake Estates, 1000 Anoka 
Avenue. Bayside Borough. 

15. Tidewater Bi|ilder$, 
Inc. requests a variance to 
allow parking in the front 
yard setback where 

jjrflhitjlterfand to waive the^ 
requirement of the front 
yard setback being 
landscaped on Parcel A-12, 
Arrowhead industrial 
Park, Arrowhead Drive. 
Kempsville Borough. 

16. First Church of the 
Nazarene by James C. 
Hickman requests a 
variance of 3 feet to a 38 foot 
building height instead of 35 
feet as allowed of a 6-acre 
parcel, adjacent to Section 
2, Old Donation Manor, 
Wishart Road. Bayside 
Borough. 

17. Thomas E. Collins 
requests a variance of 15 on 
site parking spaces to "0" 
parking spaces instead of IS 
on site parking spaces as 
required of Lots 9, 10, 1 1, 12, 
13, ^loctt 39, Shadowlawn 
Heights, 610 Norfolk 

'Avenue. Virginia Beach 
Borough. 

ALL APPLICANTS 
MUST APPEAR BEFORE 
THE BOARD. 



W. L. Towers 
Secretary 



1 23.30-2t 



NOTICE OF 
PUBLIC HEARING 

The Virginia Beach 
Planning Commission will 
hold a Public Hearing on 
Tuesday, January 29, 1974, at 
9:00 A.M. in the Council 
Chambers of the 

Administration Building, 
Princess Anne Courthouse, 
Virginia Beach, Virginia. 
The following applications 
will appear on the agenda: 
1. Petition by motion of 
the Virginia Beach Planning 
Commission to establish an 
Historic and Cultural District 
on certain property 
described as beginning at a 
point 2300 feet more or. less 
East of Great Neck Road on 
the West side of Ferelwe 
Cove of Broad Bay, running a 
distance of 1500 feet more or 
less along the Northern 
property line, running a 
distance of 975 feet more or 
less along the Western 
property line, running a 
distance of 400 fee* more or 
less along the Southern 
property line and followir«g 
Broad Bay (Ferebee Cove) 
along the Eastern property 
' line (said parcel contains 23.7 
acres more or less) and to 
classify the property known 
as BROAD BAY MANOR 
located at 1696 North Great 
Neck Road as ah historical 
Site deemed- desirable for 
preservation. Plats with 
more detailed information 
are available in the 
Department of Planning. 
(Broad Bay Area). LYNN 
HAVEN BOROUGH. 

2. Petition by motion of the 
Virginia Beach Planning 
Commission to establish an 
Historic and Cultural District 
on certain property 
descrlt>ed as beginning at a 
point 1700 feet more or less 
North of Great Neck Road 
East of Frank W. Cox High 
School, running a distane«j>f 
700 feet more or less aiorni 
the Northern property line 
'(Broad Bay), running a 
distance of 100 feet more or 
less along the Eastern 
property line, running a 
distance of 415 feet more or 
less along, the Southern 
property line and running a 
distance of 9M> feet more or 
less along the Western 
property line (said parcel 
contains 12.41 acres more or 
less) andtoi classify the 
property known as GREEN 
HILL FARM as an 




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historical site deemed 
desirable for preservation,, 
Plats with more detailed 
Information are available 
in the Department of 
Planning. (Broad Bay 
Area). LYNNHAVEN 
BOROUGH. 

3. Petitton by motkNi of the 
Virginia Beach Planning 
Commisskm to establish an 
Historic and Cultural District 
on certain property located 
lOn the South skie of Adam 

Keeling Road, beginning at a 
<point 3700 feet mora or less 
West of Great Nack Roed, 
running a distance of 200 feet 
along the South slde.eLAdam 
Keelinq Road, running a 
dlstiMce of 235 feet more or 
lass along the Eastern 
property Hne, running a 
distafKe of 280 feet more or 
j.leM along the Southern 
V*li*wrty tine and running a 
distance of 325 feet more or 
less along the Western 
property line (said parcel 
contains 1.08 acres more or 
less) and to dessify the 
property known as ADAM 
KEELING HOUSE located 
at 3157 Adam Keeling Road 
as an historical site deemed 
desirable for preservation. 
Plats with more detailed 
Information are available in 
the Department of Planning. 
(Great Neck Point Area). 
LYNNHAVEN BOROUfiH. 

4. Petition by motion of the 
Virginia Beach Planning 
Commission to establish an 
Historic and Cultural Dis- 
trict on certain property 
described as beginning at a 
point 500 feet more or less 
North of the intersection of 
Kempsville Road, Princess 
Anne Road and Bonney Road 
(proposed as South Witch- 
duck Road), running a 
distance of 660 feet along the 
West side bf Bonney Road 
(proposed as South Witch- 
duck Road), running a 
distance of 610 feet more or 
less along the Northern 
property line, running a 
distance of 350 .feet more or 
less along the Western 
property line and running a 
distance of 60O feet more or 
less along the Southern 
property line (said parcel 
contains 6.97 acres more or 
less) and to classify the' 
property known as the 
KEMPSVILLE JAIL located 
at 5172 Bonney Road as an 
historicar site deemed 

- desirable for preservation. 
Plats with more detailed 
information are available In 
the Department of Planiiing. 
(Kempsville Area). KEMPS- 
VILLE BOROUGH. 

5. Petition by motion of the 
Virginia Beach Planning 
Commission to establish ah 
Historlc^ndGutt ura l Distr iet — 
on certain property _ 
described as the Eastern 
extremity of Harlie Avenue 
and Trestman Avenue and 
the East side of Harlie Ct., 
running a distance of 700 feet 
more or less along the 
Western property line, 
running a distance of 470 feet 
more or less along the 
Southern property line, 
running a distance of 280 feet 
more or less along the 
Eastern property line and 
running a distance of 780 feet 
more or less along the 
Northern property line (said 
parcel contains 6.7 acres 
more or less) and to classify 
the property known as the^ 
RICHARD MURRAY 
HOUSE located at 3300 
Harlie Avenue as an 
historical site deemed 
desirable for preservation. 
Plats with more detailed 
information are available in 
the Department of Planning. 
(Sherry Park Area). 
KEMPSVILLE BOROUGH. 

6. Petition by motion of the 
Virginia Beach Planning 
Commission to establish an 
Historic and Cultural District 
on certain property 
described as beginning at a 
point 475 feet more or less 
West of Sale Drive and 
running a distahce of 200 feet 
more or less along the West 
side of South Crestline Drive, 
running a distance of 300 
feet more or less along ° 
the Noryiern property line, 
running a distance of 550 
feet more or less along the 
Western property line and 
running a distance of 280 feet 
more or less along the 
Southern property line (said 
parcel contains 2.2 acres 
more or less) and to classify 
the pi-operty known as the 
THOMAS MURRAY HOUSE 
located at 3425 South 
Crestline Drive as an 
historical site deemed 
desirable for preservation. 
Plats with more detailed 
information are available in 
the Department of Planning. 
(Elizabeth River Shores 
Area). KEJMPSVILLE 
BOROUGH. 

7. Petition by motion of the 
Virginia Beach Planning 
Commission to establish an 
Historica and Cultural 
District on certain property 
described as the North and 
South sides of North Witch 
duck Road East of 
Cathedral Drive, (a). running 
a distance of 950 feet along 
the Sooth side of North 
Witchduck Road, running a 
distance of 400 feet alof»g the 
West side of Donation Drive, 
running a distance of 900 feet 
more or less along the 
Southern property line and 
running a distance of 190 feet 

^ more or less along the 
Western property line (said 
parcel contains 5.34 acres 
more or less); (b) running a 
distance of 640 feet more or 
less along the North side of 
North Witchduck Road 
across from Catjiedral Drive, 
running a distance of 115 feet 
more or less along the 
Western property line, 
running a distance of 610 feet 
more or less along the 
Northern property line and 
running a distance of IM feet 
more or less along the 
Eastern property line (said 
parcel contains 1.83 acres 
more or less) and to classify 
the property known as OLD 



PRIVATE 
ROOM 

Daily Moid S«ific« 
— ^ M «d »P « ay ^ 

M60.C 



5U-1314 

*i VMBMONONOm 



DONATION CHURCH 
located at 4449 North Witch- 
duck Road ^^ an historTcal 
site doamad desirable tor 
preservation. Plats with 
nwre detailed Information 
• are available in the 
Department of Planning. 
(Donation Shores Area). 
BAYSIDE BOROUGH. 

8. Petition by motton of ttw 
Virginia Beach Planning 
CommlMlon to establish an 
Historic and Cultural District 
on certain property 
described as located at the 
Intersection of Hinsdale 
Street and Constitution 
Avenpe North of Jonathaa, 
Court, running a distance of 
350 feet more or less along 
the Northern property 4ine 
and running a distance of 350 
feet more or less along the 
Southern Mperty' line (said 
parcel is irregular in shape) 
and to classify the property 
known as PEMBROKE 
MANOR as an historical site 
deemed desirable for 
preservation. Plats with 
more detailed information 
are available in the 
Department of Planning. 
(Pembroke Manor Area). 
BAYSIDE BOROUGH. 

9. Petition by motion of the 
Virginia Beach Planning 
Commission to establish an 
Historic and Cultural District 
on certain prooerty 
described as located at the 

North side of Princess Anne 
Road East and West of 
Overland Road, running a 
distance of 825 feet along the 
North side of Princess Anne 
Road, running a distance of 
550 feet more or less along 
the Western property line, 
running a distance of 915 feet 
more or less along the 
Northern property line and 
running a distance of 520 feet 
more or less along the West 
side of Bonney Road 
(proposed North Witchduck 
Road) (said parcel contains 
9.2 acres more or less) and to 
classify the property known . 
as PLEASANT HALL 
(PETER SINGLETON 
HOUSE) located at 5184 
Princess Anne Road as an 
historical site deemed 
desirable for preservation. 
Plats with more detailed 
information are available in 
the Department of Planning. 
(Kempsville Area). KEMPS- 
VILLE BOROUGH. 

10. Petition by motion of 
the Virginia Beach Planning 
Commission to establish an 
Historic and Cultural District 
on certain property 
described as located on the 
South side of side of Virginia 
Beach Boulevard across 
from Little Neck Road, 
running a distance of 1100 
feet more or less along the 
Sooth side of Virginta Be 
Boulevard, running a 
distance of 720 feet along the 
Eastern property line, 
running a distance of 870 feet 
more or less along the 
Southern property line and 
running a distance of 1250 
feet more or less along the 
Western property line (said 
parcel contains 18.6 acres 
more or less) and to classify 
the property known as ROSE 
HALL located at 3133 
Virginia Beach Boulevard as 
an historical site deemed 
desirable for preservation. 
Plats with more detailed 
Information are available in 
the Department of Planning. 
(Princess Anne Plaza- 
Groveland Park-Belle Haven 
Areas). LYNNHAVEN 
BOROUGH. 

11. Petition by motion of 
the Virginia Beach Planning 
Commission to establish an 
Historic and CuituPai District 
on certain property 
described as located on the 
East side of Parish Road 
between Club Circle and 
Thoroughgood Drive,- run- 
ning a distance of 500 feet 
along the East side of Parish 
Road, running a distance of 
390 feet along the South side 
of Thoroughgood Drive, 
running a distance of 480 feet 
along the Eastern property 
line and running a distance of 
340 feet along the Southern 
property line of which 240 
feet is the North side of Club 
Circle fsald parcel contains 
3.48 acres more or less) and 
to classify the property 
known as ADAM 
THOROUGHGOOD HOUSE 
located at 163% Parish Road 
as an historical site deemed 
desirable for preservation. 
Plats with more detailed 
information are available in 
the Department of Planning. 
(Thoroughgood Area). 
BAYSIDE BOROUGH. 

12. Petition by motion of 
the Virginia Beach Planning 
Commission to establish an 
Historic and Cultural District 
on certain property 
described as tieginning at a 
point 2600 feet more or less 




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FOR EVERY JOt 



R 



AYLOR 
RENTAL 



382S Bonney Rd. 
(Locat|d Near Mbore's 
"Bldif^upply) 

340-0908 



&I 



uisitt 



West of Air Station Drive, 
and 430 feet more or less 
Nortt) of Potters Drive, 
running a distance of 890 feet 
more or less along the 
[A Souttiern property line 
' (Norfolk and Soutttern 
Railway Right of Way), 
running a distance of 1220 
feet nwre or less along the 
Eastern property line, 
running a distance of 12S0 
feet more or less along the 
Northern property line and 
ruhriing a distance of 1190 
['•feet nwe or less along the 
Western property line (said 
parcel contains 30.2S acres 
more or less) and to classify 
the property known as the 
UPPER WOLFSNARE 
HOUSE located at 2040 
Potters Road as an historical 
site deemed desirable for 
preservation. Plats with 
more detailed information 
are available In the 
Department of Planning. 
(Oceana Naval Air Station 
Area). LYNNHAVEN 
BOROUGH. 

13. Petition by motion of 
the Virginia Beach Planning 
Commission to establish an 
Historic and Cultural District 
on certain property 
described as beginning at a 
point at the Northeastern 
extremity of Moores Pond 
Road and 4800 feet more or 
less East of , Baker Road, 
running a distanc^e of 500 feet 
more or less along the 
Southern, property line, 
running a distance of 410 feet 
more or less along the 
Eastern property line, 
running a distance of 325 feet 
more or less along the 
Northern property line and 
running a distance of 490 feet 
more or less along the 
Western property line (said 
parcel contains 3.54 acres 
more or less) and to classify 
the property known as 
WEBLIN HOUSE located at 
5588 AAoores Pond Road as to 
historical site deemed 
desirable for preservation. 

. Plats with more detailed 
information are available in 
the Department of Planning. 
(Lawsdn Forest Area). 
BAYSIOE BOROUGH. 

14. Petition by motion of 
the Virginia Beach Planning 
Commission to establish an 
Historic and Cultural District 
on certain property 
described as beinning at a 
point 520 feet more or less 
East of Donation Drive, 
running a distance of 270 feet 
more or less along the South 
side of WIshart Road, run- 
ning a distance of 660 feet 
more or less along the 
Eastern properfy line, 
running a distance of 50 ?feet 
more or less along the 
Southern property line and 
running a distance of 670 feet 
more or less along the 
Western property line (said 
parcel contains 2.9 acres 
more or less) and to classify, 
the property known as the 
WISHART HOUSE located 
on Wishart Road as an 
historical site deemed 
desirable for preservation. 
Plats with more detailed 
jpformation are available in 
the Department of Planning. 
BAYSIDE BOROUGH. 

15. Petition by motion of 
the Virginia Beach Planning 
Commission to establish an ' 
Historic and Cultural District 

on cer ta in property 

described as beginning at a 
point 230 feet more or less 
North of Chicken Valley 
Road, running a distance of 
185 feet more or less along 
the West side of West 
Plantation Road, running a 
distance of 125 feet more or 
less along the Southern 
property line, running a 
distance of 180 feet more or 
less along the Western 
property line and running a 
distance of 140 feet more or 
less along the Northern 
property line (said parcel 
contains 24,829 square feet 
more or less) and to classify 
the property known as 
WOLFSNARE PLANTA 
TION HOUSE located at 513 
West Plantation Road known 
as Lot 12, Block H, Plat of 
Point O' Woods as an 
historical site deemed 
desirable for preservation. 
Plats with more detailed 
information are available in 
the Department of Planning. 
(Point O' Woods lArea). 
LYNNHAVEN BOROUGH. 
16. Petition by motion of the 
Virginia Beach Planning 
Commission to establish an 
Historic and Cultural District 
on certain property 
described as beginning at a 
point 3875 feet more or less 
Northwest of Oceana 
Boulevard and 760 feet more 
or less North of London 

fridge Road, running a 
distance of 245 feet more or 
pess along the Southern 
property line, running a 
distance of yo feet more or 
less along the Western 
liroperty line, running a 
distance of 240 feet more or 
Jess along the Northern 
property line and running a 
distance of 630 feet more or 
less along the Eastern 
property line (said parcel 
Hpontains 2.9 acres more or 
^less) and to classify the 
Property known as the 
JONATHAN WOODHOUSE 
3H0ME as an historical site 
deemed desirable for 
sreservation. Plats with 
nore detailed information 
Ire available in the De- 
partment of Planning. 
<( Princess Anne Hunt Club 
^rea). PRINCESS ANNE 
tBOROUGH. 

*■ All interested persons are 
^nvited to attend. 

<harles C. Carrlngton 

^Director of Planning 

i 1 14,1 23^21 



iCemmonwealth of Virginia, 
J I in fhe Clerk's Office of the 
iCircuit Court of the City of 
{Virginia Beach, on the 10th 
Jday of January, 1974. 

f ORDER OF 

I PUBLICATION 

I jJohn M. Stone, 

fPlaintiff, 

|against 
r^T^soy Stone, 

*Pefendant. 

* i The object of this suit is to 

jimatrlmonii from the said 
^defendant upon tfte grounds 

Jof desertion. 

> And an affidavit having 
|»been made and filed that the 
Ijdefendanf is a non resident of 
Lthe State of Virginia, the last 
Itknown post office address 
Ijbeing : 937 Avandale Avenue, 
Ij+tolly Hill. Florida 32107 
1» It is»«-dered ttwt stw do 
l^ppear here within fen (10) 



days after due publication 
hereof, and do what may be 
necessary to protect her 
interest in this suit. 

John V. Fentress, Clerk 
J. Curtis Fruit, D.C. 

Bangel, Bongel & Bangel, 

P.g. 

Law Building 

Portsmouth, Virginia 

^^^^^^16JaJ^0J2;MT 

Commonwealth of Virginia, 
In the Clerk's Office of the 
Circuit Court of the City of 
Virginia Beach, on the 9th 
day of January, 1974. 

ORDER OF 
PUBLICATION 

Frances E. Tollson, 
Plaintiff, 

against ' 

Robert A. Tollson, 
Defendant. 

The object of this suit is to 
obtain a divorce a mensa et 
thoro to be later merged into 
a divorce A Vinculo 
Matrimonii from the said 
defendant, upon the grounds 
of desertion. 

And an affidavit having 
been made and filed that the 
defendant is a non-resident of 
the state of Virginia, the last 
known post office address 
being: c-o Warrant Officers 
Mess, USS Independence, 
CV-62, c-o FPO, New York, 
N.Y. 09501 

It Is ordered that he do' 
appear here within ten (10) 
days after due publication 
hereof, and do what may t>e 
necessary to protect his 
interest in this suit. 

John V. Fentress: Clerk 
Sandra Hargrove, D.C. 

Broyles, Mckenry, Gorry 8i 

Dills 

3500 Pacific Avenue 

Virginia Beach, Virginia, 

23451 

1-16,23,30,2-6'4T 

Commonwealth of Virginia, 
In the Clerk's Office of the 
Circuit Court of the City of 
Virginia Beach, on the 28th 
day of December, 1973. 

ORDER OF 
PUBLICATION 

Emma K. Bernard, 

Plaintiff, 

against 

J. Thomas Bernard, 

Defendant. 

The object of this suit is to 
obtain a divorce a mensa et 
thoro to be later merged into 
»de cr ee of divorce^Arinc 
matrimonii from the said 
defendant, upon the grounds 
of desertion as of August 13, 
1973. 

And an affidavit having, 
been made and filed that the 
defendant is a non-resident of 
the State of Virginia, the last 
known post office address 
being: Box 284, Geneva, 
Florida 23732 

It is ordered that he do 
appear here within ten (10) 
days after due publication 
^hereof, and do what may be 
necessary to protect his 
interest in this suit. 

John V. Fentress, Clerk 

J. COrtis FruW, D.C: "^ 

Boyce 8> Spanoulls 

105 N. Plaza Trarr 

Virginia Beach, Virginia 

l-16,23,20,2-6-4T 

Commonwealth of Virginia, 
In the Clerk's Office of the 
Circuit Court of the City of 
Virginia Beach, on the 8th 
day of January, 1973. 

ORDER OF 
PUBLICATION 

William Vernon Cason, 

Plaintiff, 

against 

destine Delores Cason, 

Defendant. 

Ttte object of this suit is to 
obtain a divorce A Vinculo 
Matrimonii from the said 
defendant, upon the grounds 
of two (2) years continuous 
separation. 

>' And an affidavit having 
been made and filed that the 
defendant is not a resident of 
the State of Virginia, the last 
known post office address 
being: c-o General Delivery, 
Spring Valley, New York 

It is ordered that she do 
appear here Within ten (10) 
days after due publication 
hereof, and do what may be 
necessary to protect her 
interest in this suit. 

J 
John V. Fentress: Clerk 
Sandra Hargrove, D.C. 

Broyles, McKenry, Gorry & 

Dills 

3500 Pacific Ave. 

Virginia Beach, VA, p.q. 

l-16.23,30,2-6-4T 

Commonwealth of Virginia, 
in the Clerk's Office of the 
Circuit Court of the City of 
Virginia Beach, on the 8th 
day of January, 1974. 

ORDER OF 
PUBLICATION 

Frederick A. Haycox, Jr., 

Plaintiff, 

against 

Claudine Cook Haycox, 

Defendant. 

The object of this suit is to 
obtain a divorce a mensa et 
thoro to be later merged into 
a divorce a vinculo 
matrimonii from the said 
defendant, upon the grounds 
of desertion. 

And an affidavit having 
been made and filed that the 
defendant is a non resident of 
the State of Virginia, the last 
known post office address 
being: Iphikas No. 660, 
Athens, Greece 

It is ordered that she do 
appear here within ten (10) 
days after due publication 
hereof, and do what may be 
necessary to protect her 
Interest in this suit. 

John V. Fentress: Clerk 
J. Curtic Fruit, D.C. 

Edward T. Caton, III 
2508 Pacific Avenue 
P.O. Box 42 

Virginia 



Wanda Jane Gooch, 

Plaintiff, 

against 

Stanley Lee Gooch, 

Defendant. 

The object of this suit Is to 
obtain a divorce vinculo 
matriomll from the said 
defendant, upon the grounds 
of desertion for more than 
one' year. 

And an affidavit having 
been made and filed that the 
defendant Is a non-resident Of 
the State of Virginia, the last 
known post office address 
being: Muncie, IH. 

It Is ordered that he do 
appear here within ten (10) 
days after due publication 
hereof, and do wtwt may be 
necessary to protect his 
Interest In this suit. 

John V. Fentress: Clerk 
Sandra Hargrove, D.C. 

Garland M. Layton 

1510 Pleasure House Road 

Virginia Beach, Virginia 

l-16,23,30,2-6-4T 

Commonwealth of Virginia, 
In the Clerk's Office of the 
Circuit Court of the City of 
Virginia Beach, on the 7th 
day of January, 1974. 

ORDER OF 
PUBLICATION 

Mary Lou Ise;^ 
Mai'y Louise McDonald, 
PlalntlH, 
against 

Richard Glen McDonald, 
Defendant. 

The object of this suit Is to 
obtain a divorce a vinculo 
matrimonii from the said 
defendant, upon the grounds 
of constructive desertion. 

And an affidavit having 
been made and filed that the 
defendant is a non-resident of 
the State of Virginia, the last 
known post office address 
being: c-o Leatrice 
McDonald, 7974 24th Street, 
N., St. Pertersburg, Florida 

It is ordered that he do 
appear here within ten (10) 
days after due publication 
hereof , and do What may be 
necessary to protect his 
interest in this suit. 

John V. Fentress, Clerk 
Sandra Hargrove, D.C. 

Murphy, Bennett 8i Basnight, 

Ltd. 

3330 Pacific Avenue 

Virginia Beach, Va. 23451 

1-16, 23,30, 2-6-4T 



Commonwealth of Virg inia, 
In the ctents Office of the 
Circuit Court of the City ,of 
Virginia Beach, on the 3rd » 
day of January, 1974. 



and If they or any of them be 
deadtheir surviving spouses. 
If wiy, t)elrs at low, devisees, 
executors and-or ad- 
ministrators, the Hen 
creditors of any and all of 
said parties, if any there be, 
and alt other persons having 
on interest in ttte property to 
be condemned in these 
proceedingsi, the names and 
addresses of said parties 
being unknown, and are 
hereby proceeded against as 
"Parties Unknown"; and .«• 
Acre, more or less, land. In 
Princess Anne Borough, 
Virtilnia Beach, Virginia. 

Defendants. 

ORDER OF 
PUBLICATION 

In this proceeding the 
petitioner seeks to acquire by 
coTKlemnatlon the fee simple 
title to a ortaln parcel of 
land situated in Princess 
Anne Borough of the City of 
Virgin!^ Beach, Virginia, for 
the uses and purposes of 
the petitioner, to wit, for the 
expansion of the municipal 
government complex at 
Princess Anne Station, the 
natur^ of the vrarks and 
Improvements being more 
parttcularly described in the 
petltkHi and exhibit attached 
thereto on file in the office of 
the clerk of this court, to 
which reference is hereby 
Utadefor a full and accurate 
description thereof; and for 
the appointment of com- 
missioners to ascertain just 
compensation to the owners 
of any estate or interest in 
the property to be taken or 
affected as a result of the 
taking and use thereof by the 
petitioner. 

For such pvrposes, the 
petitioner will apply to the 
court, sitting ■ at Princess 
Anne Courthouse, Virginia 
Beach, Virginia, on the 30th 
day of January, 1974, at 9:30 
o'clock a.m., or as soon 
thereafter as counsel may be 
heard, for the appointment of 
commissioners to ascertain 
just compensation as 
aforesaid. 

And It appearing by af- 
fidavit filed according to law 
that the following owner's are 
believed by the petitioner not 
to be residents of the State of 
Virginia, to wit: Grayson A. 
Price, Helen Price, Wesley 
W. Price and Vivian Price; 
that the last kpown addresses 
of Grayson A. Price and 
Helen Price was Jessups, 
Maryland, and that of Wesley 
W. Price and Vivian Price 
was Mewberry, 
Massachusetts; that if they 
or any of them be dead, their 
surviving spouses, if any, 
h ei rs at — taw, — de visee s , 



ORDER OF 
PUBLICATION 

Terry Elizabeth Russo Horst, 

Plaintiff, 

against 

Randolph Booth Horst, 

Defendant. 

The object of this suit is lo 
obtain a divorce a vinculo 
matrimonii from the said 
defendant, upon the grounds 
of having lived separate and 
apart without , any 
.cbnabitations and without 
interruption from more than 
two (2) years. 

And an affidavit having 
been made and filed that the 
defendant is a non-resident of 
the State of Virginia, the last 
known post office address 
being: RFD No. 2, Box 586-B, 
Roanoke Rapids, North 
Carolina 

It is ordered that he do 
appear here within ten (10) 
days after due publication 
hereof, and do what may be 
necessary to protect his 
interest in this suit. 

John v., Fentress: Clerk 
Sandra Hargrove, DC. 

Ann E. Calevas 

604 Plaze One Building 

Norfolk, Virginia 

'-16,23,30,2-641 

Commonwealth of Virginia, 
In the Clerk's Office of the 
Circuit Court of the City of 
Virginia Beach, on the 7th 
day of January, 1974. 

ORDER OF 
PUBLICATION 

Donnie William Miller, 

Plaintiff, 

against 

Charlie Sue Miller, 

Defendant. 

The object of this suit is to 
6btain a divorce a vinculo 
matrimonii from the said 
defendant, upon the grounds 
of two years separation. 

And an affidavit 
having been made and filed 
that the defendant is a non- 
resident of the State of 
Virginia, the last known post 
office address being: 1802 E. 
Market Street, Enid, 
Oklahoma 

It is ordered that she do 
appear here within ten (10) 
days after due publication 
hereof, and do what may be 
necessary to protect her 
interest in this suit. 

John V. Fentress: Clerk 
Sandra Hargrove, DC. 

Murphy, Bennett K Basnight, 

Ltd. 

3330 Pacific Avenue 

Virginia Beach, Virginia, 

p-q 

^^^^^M6^3^^^T 
VIRGINIA: " 

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT 
OF THE CITY OF 
VIRGINIA BEACH 

CITY OF VIRGINIA 
BEACH, A Municipal cor- 
poration. 

Petitioner, 

LAW NO. L-2A 

vs 

AAARIAN G. PRICE 
2460 North Landing Road 
Virginia Beach, Virginia; 



■ LJ_.LXi E 



1 16,23,M,2 6-4T 



Commonwealth ct Virginia, 
In the Cferk's OHice of the 
Circuit Court of the City of 
Virginia Beech, on the 7th 
day rt January, 1974. 

ORDER OP 
PUBLICATION 



fl.£.i-_L_E_ 
WOODHOUSE, 
3468 North Landing Road, 
Virginia Beach, Virginia; 

GLORIA P. TUCCILLE and 
ROBERT R. TUCCILLE, 
321 Hannibal Street, 
Virginia Beach, Virginia; 

GRAYSON A. PRICE, 
HE%€N PRICE, WESLEY 
W. PRICE, VIVIAN PRICE, 



The Object of this suit is to 
obtain a divorce A VIncolo 
AAatrlmonll from the said 
deferylant, upon the grounds 
of desertion. And an affidavit 
having been made and filed 
that the defendant is not a 
Resident of the State of 
Virginia, the fast known post 
office Maf§u being: P.O. 
Box 96, Electric, Ala- 
bama, it Is ordered 
that he do .appear here 
within ten (10) days'after due 
publication hereof, and do 
what may be necessary to 
protect his interest In this 
suit. 

William H. Cotona, Jr. 
381 Independence Blvd. 
Va. Beach, VA, p.q. 
John V. Fentress: Clerk 

1-16,a3,30,3-6-4-f- 

Commonwealtt^^lrgmla7 
* In the Clerk's Office of 
the Circuit Court of the City 
of Virginia Beach, on the 
11th day of January, 1974. 
Delberta J. Hall, Plaintiff, 
against 

Jessie Ralph Hall, 
Defendant. 

ORDER OF 
PUBlLiCATION 

Theobjectof thissult Is to 

obtain a divorce A Vinculo 

. Matrimonii from the said 

defendant, upon the 

grounds of desertion. 

And an affidavit having 
been made and filed that 
the defendant is not a 
resident of the State of 
Virginia, the last known 
post office address being: 
P.O. Box^ 96, Electric 
Alabama. 

It is ordered that he do 
appear here within ten (10) 
days after due publication 
hereof, and do what may be 
necessary to protect his 
interest in this suit. 

JOHN V. FENTRESS: 
CLERK 

William H. Colona, Jr. 
281 Independence Blvd. 
Va. Beach, VA 
-4-16,23,30,2-6-4T 

Commonwealth of Virginia, 
In the Clerk's Office of 
the Circuit Court of the City 
of Virginia Beach, on the 
11th day of January, 1974. 
Linda Marie Oison, 
Plaintiff, 
against 

Walter Edward Olson, 
Defendant. 

ORDEROF 
PUBLICATION 

Theobject Of this suit is to 
obtain a divorce A Vinculo 
Matrimonii from the said 
defendant, upon the 



executors andor ad- 
ministrators, the lien 
creditors df any and all of 
said parties, if any there be, 
and all other persons having 
an interest in the property to 
be condemned in these 
proceedings, are unknown to 
the petitioner. 

It is accordingly OR- 
DERED that the aforesaid 
owners do appear within ten 
(10) days after due 
publication of this order in 
the Clerk's Office of the 
Circuit Court of the Cty of 
Virginia Beach, Virginia, 
and do what rs necessary to 
protect their interests; and it 
is FURTHER ORDERED' 
that if any of the above 
named owners desires to 
assert any objection or 
defense to the taking or 
damaging of his property or 
to the jurisdiction of the court 
to h^r the case and to 
proceed with the ap- 
pointment of commissioners 
he shall file his answer and 
grounds of defense 
designating the property in 
v»^ich he clai/ns to be in- 
terested, the grounds of any 
objectionr defense to the 
taking or damaging of his 
property or to the jurisdic- 
tion of the court to hear the 
case and to proceed with the 
appointment of com- 
missioners for the deter 
mination of just com- 
pensation. 

Should any suctuowner fail 
to file his answer and 
grounds of defense as 
hereinabove provided, such 
failure shall not preclude the 
owner from appearing on the 
date set for the appointment 
of commissioners nor from 
presenting evidence as to 
valuation and damage npr 
from sharing in the award of 
just compensation according 
to his interest therein or 
otherwise protecting his 
rights, but %uch failure shall 
preclude such owner from 
anyother defenses by wayof 
pleas in bar, abatement or 
otherwise. 

KELLAM, PICKRELL 8. 

LAWLER, p.q. 

(James M. Pickrell) 

1020 F irst 8i Merchants Bank 

Building 

Norfolk/ Virginia 23510 

John V. Fentress, Clerk 
Gladys J. Coalroy, D.C. 

1 16, 23, 30,2 6 4T 

ORDEROF 
PUBLICATION 

Commonwealth of Virginia, 
In the Clerk's Office of the 
Circuit Court of the City of 
Virgin^ Beach, on the 11th 
day of January, 19th 1974. 
Linda Marie Olson, Plaintiff, 
against 

Walter Edward Olson, 
Defendant. 

The object of this suit is to 
obtain a divorce A Vinculo 
AAatrimonii from the said 
defendant, upon the grounds 
of two years separation.And 
an affidavit having been 
made and filed that the 
defendant is rwt a resident of 
the State of Virginia, the last 
known post office address 
being: Barnard Hall, 1330 G 
Kobbe Avenue, Presidio, 
San Francisco, California it 
is ordered that he (to appear 
here within ten (10) days 
after due publication hereof, 
and do what may be 
necessary to protect his 
interest In ffvis suit. 
James 8, Consolvo 
3221 Virginia Beach Blvd. 
Virginia Beach, VA. p.q. 

John V. Fentress: Clerk 
By: Sandra Hargrove D., 
Clerk. 

. j_J6. 23, 30. 2 6 4-U 

ORDEROF 
PUBLICATION 

Commonwealth of Virginia, 
in the Clerk's Office of the 
Circuit Court of the City of 
Virginia Beach on tfte 11th 
(tay of January, W74. 
Delberta J. Hall, Plaintltf, 
agains} 

Jessie Ralph Hall, Defen 
ri»nt 



grounds of two years 
separation. 

And an affidavit having 
been made andf lied that the 
defendant is not a resident 
of the State of Virginia, the 
last known post office 
address being: Barnard 
Hall, 1330 G Kobbe Avenue, 
Presidio, San Francisco, 
California. 

It is ordered that he do 
appear here within ten (10) 
days after due publication 
hereof, and do what may be 
necessary to protect his 
interest in this suit. 

JOHN V. FENTRESS;. 

CLERK 

BY Sandra Hargrove, D.' 

Clerk 

James 8. Consolvo 
3221 Virginia Beach Blvd. 
Virginia Beach, VA 
1 16,23,30,2 6 4T 

VIRGINIA: 

IN THE CLERK'S OF- 
FICE OF The circuit 

COURT OF THE CITY OF 
VIRGINIA BEACH, ON THE 
2nd DAY OF JANUARY, 
1974. 

In re: Adoption of Kim- 
berly Ann Sutton 
By: Stephen Charles Roggy 
and Linda Marie Cole Sutton 
Roggy (Natural Mother) 

To: Charles Augustus Sutton 
3884 M Street 
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 

IN CHANCERY 
C-73-1672 

ORDER 

This day came Stephen 
Charles Roggy and Linda 
Marie Cole Sutton Roggy, 
Petitioners, and represented 
that the object of this 
proceeding is to effect the 
adoption of the above named 
infant, Kimberly Ann Sutton, 
by Stephen Charles Roggy 
and Linda Marie Cole Sutton 
Roggy, husband and wife, 
and affidavit having been 
made and filed that Charels 
Augustus Sutton, a natural 
parent of said child, is a non- 
resident of the State of 
Virginia, the last known post 
office address being: 3884 M 
Street, Philadelphia, Penn- 
sylvania. 

It is therefore Ordered that 
the said Charles Augustus 
Sutton appear before this 
Court within ten (10) days 
after publication of this Orer 
and indicate his attitude 
toward the proposed adop- 
tion, or otherwise do what is 
necessary to protect his 
interest In this matter. 

A copy teste: 

John V. Fentress, Clerk 

By: J. Curtis Fruit, D.C. 

John D. Hooker, Jr. , p.q. 
3707 Virginia Beach Blvd. 
Virginia Beach, Virginia 
23452 

19, 16, 23, i0 4T 



hereof, and do wtjat may be 
necessary to protect his 
interest in this suit. 

A copy -Teste: 

J. Curtis Fruit, Clerk. 

Wllllom H. Colona, Jr.. p.q. 
281 Independence Blvd. 
Virginia Beach, Virginia 

19, 16, 23, 30-4T 

Commonwealth of Virginia, 
In the Clerk's Office of the 
Circuit Court of the City of 
Virginia Beech, on the 2nd 
day of January, 1974. 

Benlamin Oeorge Puleo, 

Plaintiff, 

against 

Alice Faye Puleo, Defendant. 

ORDER OF 
PUBLICATION 

The object of this suit Is to 
obtain a divorce a vinculo 
matrimonii from the said 
defendant, upon the grounds 
of desertion. 

And an affidavit having 
been made ar\d filed that the 
defendant Is a non-resident of 
the State of Virginia, the last 
known post office address 
being: 3249 Orange Street, 
National Xlty, California, 
93050. 

ft Is ordered that she do 
appear here within ten (10) 
days after due jaublicatlon 
hereof, and do what may be 
necessary to protect her 
Interest In this suit. 

A copy-Teste: 

J. Curtis Fruit, Clerk. 

Fine, Fine, Legum St Fine, 

p.q. 

730 Law Building 

Norfolk, Virginia 

19, 16, 23?30-4T 



VIRGINIA: 

IN THE CLERK'S OF- 
FICE OF THE CIRCUIT 
COURT OF THE CITY OF 
VIRGINIA BEACH, ON THE 
2ND DAY OF JAN., 1974. 

In re: Adoption of ELMO 
.THOMAS HESSE, JR., 
an infant under the age of 
fourteen years 

Bv: Randolph Howard 
Foster and Juanita Hesse 
Foster, 

P«(tltloners 
To: Elmo Thomas Hesse Sr. 
Maysvllle, West Virginia 

IN CHANCERY 
C-73;335-A 

ORDER 

This day came Randolph 
'Howard Foster and Juanita 
Hesse Foster, Petifloners, 
and represented that the 
objectof this proceeding Is to 
effect the adoption of the 
abov^ named infant, Elmo 
Thomas Hesse, Jr., by 
Randolph Howard Foster 
and Juanita Hesse Foster, 
husband and wife, and af- 
fidavit having been made 
and filed that Elmo Thomas 
Hesse, Sr., a natural parent 
of said child, is a non^ 
resident of the State of 
Virginia, the last known post 
office address being: 
Maysvllle, West Virginia. 

It is.,therefore Ordered that 
the, said Elmo Thomas 
Hesse, Sr. appear before this 
Court withing ten (10) days 
after publication of this 
Oaiec. and indicate his at- 
titude toward the proposed 
adoption, or otherwise do 
what is necessary to protect 
his interest in this matter. 

A copy teste: 

John V. Fentress, Clerk 

By: Sandra Hargrove, D.C. 

Barry Kantor, p.q. 
706 Plaza One BIdg. 
Norfolk, Va. 

1 9,16, 23, 30 4T 

"NOTICE TO THE 
PUBLIC" 



Notice is hereby given to 
the public that Virginia 
Electric and Power Com- 
pany has applied to the State 
Corporation Commission for 
authority to amend its 
Purchased GAiS Adjustment 
Factor. Its present ad- 
justment factor provides for 
automatic increases or 
decreases in charges to gas 
customers because of 
changes in wholesale costs of 
gas purchsed from pipelines. 
The present increases or 
decreases in the wholesale 
cost of pipeline gas passed on 
to the Company's customers 
through the adjustment 
factor are changes that are 
approved by the Federal 
Power Commission which 
has jurisdiction over the 
interstate sale of pipeline 
gas. Under the terms of the 
revised adjustment factor, 
the Company will be 
authorized to pass on to its 
customers, in addition to 



Commonwealth of Virginia, 
In the Clerk's Offfce of the 
Circuit Court of the City of 
Virginia Beach, on the 2nd 
day of January, 1974 

ORDEROF 
PUBLICATION 

Annie H. Lynch, PlaintiH, 

against 

Levi Lynch, Defendant. 

The object of this suit Is to 
<Atain a decree of divorce a 
vinculo matrimonii from the 
said defendant, upon the 
grounds of over 2 - year 
separation. 

^And an affidavit having 
been made andjiled that the^ 
defendant due diligence has 
been used by or in behalf of 
tfie oimplainant to ascertain 
in which county or cor- 
poratkin the Mfendant is, 
without effect, me last known 
post office address being; 
Route 1, Box 7 Virginia 
Beach, Virginia 

It is ordered that he do 
appeif Iter within ten (10) 
deys alter due iwblicatian 



pipeline cost charmes the cost 
of supplemental sources of 
gas Including, but not limited 
to, liquefied natural gas 
(LNG), liquefied petroleum 
gas (LPG), and other 
hydrocarbons distributed to 
customers or used as feed- 
stock for substitute natural 
gas (SNG). The tost to the 
Company of the sup- 
plemental sources of gas will 
not be regulated. 

In Case No. 19173, after 
notice to the public and a 
public hearing, the Com- 
mission determined that all 
gas utilities should be 
authorized to seek and 
develop supplemental 
sources of gas because of the 
present gas slwrtage which 
prevails throughout the 
nation. The Commission 
further determined that the 
gas utilities should be 
altowed to file revised ad- 
justment factors which in- 
clude the cost of sup- 
plemental sources of gas. 

Virginia Electric and 
Power Company has been 
authorized to place the 
revised adjustment factor 
into effect for gas service 
rendered on and after 
January 1, 1974. The revision 
Is subject to further In- 
vestigation, upon motion of 
the Commission, or upon 
motion of any interested 
party for good cause, If such 
objection Is filed in writing 
with the Commission on or 
before February 4, 1974. 

The application and a copy 
of the revised adjustment 
factor Is available for review 
in all business offices of the 
Company where bills may be 
paid within the territory in 
which It provides gas 
serlvdce and in the offices of 
the State Corporation 
Commission, RIchombnd, 
Virginia. Any Interested 
member of the public 
wishing to object to approval 
of the revised adjustment 
factor should Inform the 
Commission of such ob- 
jection, In writing, addressed 
to William C. Young, Clerk, 
State Corporation Com- 
mission, P.O. Box 1197, Rich- 
mond, Virginia 23209, and a 
copy should be sent to Guy T. 
Tripp, III, counsel for the 
Company, P.O. Box 1535, 
Richmond, Virginia 33212. 
Anyone wishing to be heard 
orally by the Commission 
should so indicate in the 
-written notice. 

"VIRGINIA ELECTRIC 
AND POWER COMPANY" 

19, 16, 23, 30-4T 



The Sun-Wednesday, JocMMry 23, 1974-P*ge9 
John -aavld LIndly, 
Plaintiff, 
against 

^Sebora B. Llndiy, 
Defendant. 



ORDEROF 
PUBLICATION 

The object of this suit Is 
for the said plaintiff lo 
obtain a divorce a mensa et 
thoro on the grounds of 
desertion to be later 
merged Into a divorce a 
vinculo matrimonii from 
the skid defendant, upon the 
grounds of desertion 



ORDIIOF 
PUBLICATION 

The Object of this suit Is 
for the said plaintiff to 



And an aHldavIt having e".**"" • ,<*':'<'"• * '^•"" 



been made and filed that 
the defendant Is not a 
resident of the State of 
Virginia, the last known 
post office address being: 
28 Quissifttt Harbor. Road, 
Falmouth, Massachusetts. 
It Is ordered that she do 
appear here within 10 (ten) 
days after due- publlcatloh 
hereof, and do what may be 
necessary to protect her 
Interest In this suit. 

JOHN V. FENTRESS, 

CLERK 

Phyllli N. Styron, Deputy 

Clerk. 

Mr. Osle H. Gay, Jr., Atty. 
287l,.RIver Road, 
Vijcgilnia Beach, Virginia 
12,9,16,23-41 



Commonweajth of Virginia, 
In the Clert's off Ice of the 
Circuit Court of the City of 
Virginia Beach, on the 26th 
day of December, 1973. 



Et Thoro to be later merged 
Into a Divorce A Vinculo 
Matrimonii from the said 
defendant, upon the 
grounds of desertion. 

And «n affidavit having 
been made and filed that 
the defendant Is not a 
resident of the State of 
Virginia, the last known 
post office address being: 
3926 N. Keeltr Avenue, 
Chicago, Illinois. 

It is ordered that, She do 
appear here within 10 (fen) 
days after due publication 
hereof, ahd do what may be 
necessary to protect her 
Interest In this suit. 

JOHN V. FENTRESS, 

CLER K 

Phyllis N. Styron, Deputy 

Clerk 

Mr. George F. Darden, Jr., 
Atty. 

30S-30th Street, 
Virginia Beach, Virginia 
1-2,9,16,23-41 



VIRGINIA: \n 
CL E RK ' S OF FI 



THE 
ee — OF- 
THE CIRCUIT COURT OF 
THE CITY OF VIRGINIA 
BEACH, ON THE 26TH 
DAY OF DECEMBER, 1973 
In Chancery 
No. 16476-B 

In re: Adoption of Lori 

Lynn Collins 

By: Hal Max Kanoy and 

Jean Audrey Kanoy, 

Petitioners 

To: Philip M. Collins 

234 Benn's Road 

Newport News, Virginia 



/ 



ORDER 



NOTICE TO 
THE PUBLIC 



Notice is hereby given to 
the public that ARA- 
GONA UTILITIES COR- 
PORATION HAS FILED 
with the State Corporation 
Commission of Virginia 
proposed changes In 
existing isates, charges, 
rules ana regulations 
which provide for 
Increases in certain rates 
and charges. The 
commission has suspended 
the effective date of the 
proposed changes until 
April 30, 1974, unless 
otherwise. In the 
meantime, ordered. The 
proposed rates and charges 
are as follows: 
RATES FOR SERVICE: 

Each residential 
customer: $12 per quarter. 

Each apartment 
customer: $9 per quarter. 

Each commercial 
customer: 

Bill Is based on water 
consumptionj 

First 1,300 cubic feet: 
SS.85 per quarter. 

Next 7,700 cubic feet: 
39^ cents per 100 cubic 
feet. 

Next 90,000 cubic feet: 
32V4 cents per 100 cubic 



Buildings 



unit) 

Office 

office) 

Gasoline Stations 

Restaurants-Drive 

ins 

Laundromats 

Car Washes 

All others: 10 cents 

square foot with 



75.00 

(per 

75.00 

750.00 

750.00 

750.0C? 

750.00 

per 

a 



feer — 

All.pver 99,000 cubic feet: 
279 16 cents per 100 cubic 
feet. 

Minimum: • $12 per 
quarter. 

CONNECTION FEES; 
Single Family Detached 
Houses: $250.00 

Duplex per unit 250.00 

Single Family 
Townhouses: 150.00 

Apartments (per 
unit) 
Motels and Hotels 



minimum of $250.00 

An Investigation of the 
proposal changes has been 
entered upon. the 
Commission and a public 
hearing on the new rates, 
charges, rules and 
regulations has been set for 
10:00 a.m. on March 28, 
1974, in the Commission's 
Courtroom, Blanton 
Building, Richmond, 
Vif'glnla. The Company lias 
been ordered to file with 
the Commission by March 
14, 1974, the written 
testimony and exhibits to 
the; presented by It at the 
hearing. 

The witnesses whose 
testimony Is to be preflled 
will be available for cross- 
examination at the time of 
the hearing. Members of 
the public may also appear 
and be heard and present 
such relev ant dat a aS|may 
^e deslredTThe proposed 
rates, charges, rules and 
regulations art on file with 
and may be reviewed at the 
office of the Commission or 
at any business office of the 
Company. The testimony 
and exhibits of the 
Company witnesses may 
be reviewed either at the 
Commission or at any 
business office of the 
Company on and after 
March 14, 1974, 
STATE CORPORATION 
COMMISSION 



100.00 
(per 

1-23,30—2-*, 13 -4t 



-^ 



This day came Hal Max 
Kanoy and Jean Audrey 
Kanoy, Petitioners, and 
represented that the object 
Of this proceeding is lo 
effect the adoption of the 
above named Infant(s), 
Lori Lynn Collins by Hal 
Max Kanoy and Jean 
Audrey Kanoy, husband 
and wife, and affidavit 
having been made and filed 
that Philip M. Collins, a 
natural parent of said 
child, the last known post 
office address being; 234 

Benn'^S Road, Newport 

News, Virginia. 

It is therefore Ordered 
that the said Philip M. 
Collins appear before this 
Court within ten (ip) days 
after publication of this 
Order and indicate hisher 
attitude toward the 
proposed adoption, or 
otherwise do what is 
-jiecessary to protect his 
mterest in this matter. 

John V. Fentress, vClerk 
By: Sandra Hargorve D.C. 

Vffilliam C. Bunch, Jr. 

Bunch and Swanner 

Attorneys At Law 

4565 Virginia Beach 

Boulevard 

Virginia Beach, Virginia, 

"^" 12, 9, 16, 23.4T 



Commonwealth of Virginia, 
In the Clerk's Office of 
the Circuit Court of the City 
of Virginia Beach, on the 
26th day of December, 1973. 
Harold M. Quigley, 
Plaintiff, 
against 

Elizabeth C. Quigley, 
Defendant. 








DIAL-486-3433 
or 486-3434 



QUICK CHECK 
CLASSIFIED INDEX 



ANNOUNCEMENTS 



SunihlntAdi t 

P«r»on»l Nolicw 2 

^paclal Servlctt 1 

Tr»niportatlon 4 

Lost i. Found S 

Cardof Thcnki t 

In Mamorlam 7 

MonumantiBurlal Lot* I 



MERCHANDISE 



AUTOMOTIVE 



3 



Automoblin tor Salt 11 

Truck!, Tralltr», Jatpt tJ 

Wanted Automollva .rVlA 

Autoi.TrucKlforhlrt IJ 

Auto Parl», Rapalri t* 

AwtoAcct»t, Painting )4A 

Utility Trallarj )J 

eu*t> >JA 

Wantad Tralltrt 1 JB 

Atotorcyclai, Scootari 14 

Aircraft lor tala, parti 17 



I RECREATIONAL \ 

Campari, Trailar* fl 

Rac. Valtlclattorhira HA 

Cnnp, Sport* Equip 1» 

Bcacti Suppllat M 

Ooats, AAarina Suppllat II 

BoattforHIra 21A 



Artlctfi tor Sala SI 

Antlquat SlA 

Houtahold Goodi ,31 

Garagt'Rummagt SlA 

Wantad to Buy Si 

SwapTradt SlA 

Muilcal Marchandlia S4 

TV.RadlO'Storao SS 

Elactronlc Kqulpmant SSA 

Colni and Stamp! St 

JawalrySWatchai S7 

Waaring Apparal S7A 

GoodThlngitoEat SI 

Farm and Dairy Pfoductt HA 

FIrawood St 

LawnandOardan M 

Saadt Pianti'Flowart MA 

FaadandFartllliar al 

Farm Irtiplamanti 41A 

Maclilnary and Tool! a 

Building Matarlali U 

Builnatt Eaulpmtnl M 



I MOBILE HOM 

MobllaHomat for Sala U 

Moblla Horn** for Rani (SA 

Moblla Home Moveri <5B 

Mobile Home Sltei M 

Atablla Homai Winlad MA 



ROOMS-HOTELS 



EMPLOYMENT 



Help Wanted Female 31 

Halp Wanted Male H 

HalpWanledMF 14 

Retumn, Ulttlngi ]S 

Jobi Wanted M 



I FINANCULj 

Buslnew Opporlvnitlet M 

Wanted to Buy ButineM MA 

Stock* and Bondt J9 

Loan* Mortgagee 4) 

Wanted to Borrow 41 



Room* witfi Board t7 

Room* wltt»ou1 Board 'M 

Room* lor HouMkeepIng >.«* 

Ra*ort»Hot»l» n 

Reetauranis '1 

Wantad Roomtor Board li 



REAL ESTATE FOR RENT 



INSTRUCTION 



Correspondence Courie 42 

Local ln*{rucflonCla»a« 41 

General lottructlont 4}A 

Mutic OmWUramatic* 44 

Private (netruclloo* . 45 

Instruction* Wantad U 



I PETS- LIVESTOCK 



Dog*. Cat*, other Pet* 47 

Pet stud Service , 47A 

Honti, Cattle, Etc m 

Poultry S Supplies 4* 

Wanted Livestock 4*A 



DIRECTORIES 



HOMI SIRVICB-RIPAIK OUIDI 
Under Real Estate 



Apartmentt'FurnUtiad 71 

Apartmanti, Unlurnlthad 74 

Oaraea* for Rant 73 

Farms and Land lor Rant 7* 

Movers Storage 7M 

Hou*a* tor Rant 77 

Furnished l«)utes 77A 

Resort Property for Rant 71 

Suburban for Rent 7IA 

Out of Town for Rant 7IB 

WantadtoRent 7V 

For Rent or Sale K 

Ground Leases NA 

Business Placet lor Rant II 

Offices and 0«sk Space IIA 

Industrial tor Rent IIB 

I REAL ESTATE FOR SALE I 

Industrial for Sale I'C 

Business Property Sale W 

Investment Property HA 

Apartment* for Sale 120 

Farm* Land Timber M 

Real Estate Motlce* M 

For Sale twrfolk ;!! 

For Sate Virginia Beacn M 

For Sala Chesapeake 17 

For Sale Portsmoulfi ■ 

Condominiums HA 

Suburban lor Sale W 

Resort Property for Sale ♦) 

Out of Town for Sale n 

LofsforSale n 

En c lmi Ba R »»l E t t a ta 

For Saleor Eicheng* SS 

Wanted Real Estate H 

f«ew Home* for Sale *7 



PLACE A "PERSON TO PERSON" AD 
IN ANY OP THE ABOVE CLASSIFICATIONS 
1 LINES— 4 ISSUEi— *4. 4% 

Ot AL 4M-M» ar mt-MM 

, ' t -A. 



iMneMEN 



MBH 



■■ 



^^mw 



^■pipiVliBP9VHpipP7"PViP«PP«P<F9PViPVi 



wipvp 



Page 10— The Surf-Wednesday, January 23, 1974 




Ami ei«//ilied 4S6-I4SS 

486-IQ4 



PERSON to PERSON ADS! 



RATES: "Person to 
Person" ads for in- 
dividuals buyiiig, selling, 
renting, or offering a 
service. Up to 12 words, 
only $1. per issue, add SO 
cents lor each additional 4 
words. 

Classified display $2.52 i 
per column incti, with a 
minimum charge of $5.04 
except on contract basis. 
Business Rates: First u 
words in straight 
classified are S2.00 Lower 
rates may be earned. 
DEADLINE for 
classified display Is Noon 
/Monday prior to Wed- 
nesday publication. In 
column classifieds ac- 
cepted until 5 p.m. 
/Monday prior to Wed- 
nesday publication. 

Place ads at the SUN 
office I3S S. Rosemont 
Rd., Va. Beach, Va. 23452, 
or mail to Classified 
Desk ; or phone 48A-3433 or 
486-3434. Classifieds are 
priced on cash basis ; 
payment is diie upon 
receipt of statement. 



Rnnouncements 
1 — sunshine ads 



ED BELL — Jf you made it 
this time, best wishes for a 
speedy recovery. Hope to 
see you soon. Diane 

Buster — It was good to see 
you again. Some things 
even time can't change. ''"^ 
glad. 

OUR MAN "RAZZ" — 
Hurry and get well. We hate 
to se e a good man down. 



1 1 Automobfles Poi Sale 

FORD — 1966 Falcon, 
excellent condition, 
automatic shift, easy on 
gas. 340-4709. 

FORD — Galaxie 1965, 
automatic, excellent 
running condition. $400. 484- 
4457. 

OLDS — 1972 Cutlass 
Supreme, air, automatic, 
A/M-FM radio and tape, low 
mileage, excellent 
conditiOB. $3,150. 499-2670. 

LINCOLN- 
CONTINENTAL — 1973, 4 
door sedan, new condition. 
17,000 miles. Quick sale. 
$5,200. 460 0892. 

LINCOLN — CON- 

TINENTAL 1970 /Mark III. 
Blue with white vinyl top, 
white leather interior, loaded 
with all the extras, new 
radial tires. In A-1 condition. 
Very clean. 38,000 miles. 
Selling to settle estate. 
Owner, 427-1787 after 6 pm 
weekdays, anytime week- 
days.^ 

/MERCEDES BENZ — 1967, 
250SE. Excellent condition. 
340-6605 or 425-0766. 

/MGB — 1970, A/M-F/M 
stereo, metal flare blue 
paint, original owner. $2395. 
340-5355 ask for Carlyle 
Williams. 

/MUSTANG — 1969, 351, 4 
speed with new clutch and 
battery, chrome reverse 
wheels, 60 series tires, new 
Regal Red paint, excellent 
condition. $1250. 499-0647. 



1 1 AatomobOea Pot Sale 



'71 v.W. Bus, clean 


S2095 


73 Javelin, AC 


2(95 


'73 Wagonaer, AC 




ll.OOOmiles 


«95 


'7J Hornet, AC, 




sharp 


J195 


■M Cougar, AC 


1395 


'41 Ford Station Waooo 




^cylinder 


h: 


'49 Ambassador Coupe 




Clean 


1395 


'71 Chevelle, Hardtop, 




Coupe, AC 


lt9S 


'72 Ambassador wagon, 




«uMy equipped 


J595 


'73 Jt9tM»r,'AC, 4 twh. 


dr. 


H),000 miles 


3495 


MALBON 




MOTOR CO. 




413 Virginia Beach Blvd. | 


Ph one 4M 4941 


1 


Ask for Howard DeVall | 



1 1 AutonMAiM Pot tale 



VOLKSWAGEN — 1971 van, 
equipped for camping, stereo 
tape player, call 425-7793 
nights. 

e 



21 Boats, Marine SuppMt' 



36 Jobs Wanted 



RESPONSIBLE /Middle 
aged lady will care for your 
home and pets while you 
are away. 486-3469. 

..— — .*— •— — ^ 

TYPING — in my home, 
experienced secretary; 
reasonable. 420-9584. 



3a Baiiiieia Opportunity 

BUSINESS OPPORTUNITY- 
Can make $S00 a month part- 
time. Call 340-1317 for ap- 
pointment. No information 
on phone. 



Love, pee andTaT; 

Henry Geisenbler had a 
great idea in 1915. Happy 
Jaycee week, Jaycees of 
Virginia Beach! 

Nick — Hope you're feeling 
better. Don't forget to call 
me. Your favorite 
Advertising Account 
i t ^ecutive. 

i DEAR GENIAS — The 
offise is not the saim 
without yew, I need yure 
help. Ann 

P.S. She certainly does. So 
do wet 



3 Special Notices 



RENAULT 

The nation's largest selection of 
used Renaulls from the nation's 
largest Renault dealer. All 
models, colors and prices. AAost 
ar« one owner ^ears^Jntlth^jur 
famous one ye*r warranty. 

EASTERN AUTO 

933 E LITTLE CREEK RD 588 



Speci 



AUTO JUNK 

Towed Away Free 
Call 855-4372 



BLOOD DONORS 
NEEDED 
Earn Immediate cash. $40 to 
t60 a rrtonth. Blood plasma 
urgently needed. 

NORFOLK 
PLAS/MACORP. 

733 Granby St. ^23-3173 



E-2's And Up 

Also Hon Military 

Minimum Age 18 
^ „CALL5«3-3808 
We Pinanca Ask For Ribs 
73 Vega GT 

Hatchback $28S0 

73 Camoo V8 $2650 
70Oldnnobile442 $169S 

70 Chevelle SS 

2drH.T, $1750 

70 G.T.O. $1695 

70Chai8et318 $1295 

69 Roadninner $1195 

69 Buick Riviera $1295 

69 Toronado $1395 

68PaiilaneCpe $ 595 

681mpaUCpe $ 595 

68 G.T.0. 4 Spd. $ 895 

RIBS AUTO SALES 

3625 MUitaiy Hwy. 
Norfolk, acion from 
Pann Ptesh Supenn«ket 



VOLKSWAGEN — 1970, 
Bug^, excellent condition, 
standard shift with white 
wall tires and radio. S1595. 
Call 420-6986. 




HI FRIENDS 

J'M WAITING TO SERVE YOU 

ROGER MERCER 

"NEW AND USED CARS AND TRUCKS" 

iT'sRK CHEVROiETNow 

2%%i VI«6IN4A BEACH BLV^- 

VIRGINIA beach; VA. 

PHONE 486-2222 



34 Help Wanted MP 



CANDY THE CLOWN - 
Birthdays, Promotionals, 
Grand Or>enings. 587-3697. 

SEWING — done in my 
home, alterations. Children 
or adults. Fine work, 486- 
7610. _ _' 

Reduce safe 8i fast with 

GoBese Tablets 8. E Vap 

"water pills" Murden 
Drug. 

THE PE/MBROKE POP 
PETS — Are now available 
for Birthday Parties, Special 
Events, etc. Children and 
Adult entertainment. 497- 
4141, 497-0982. , 



SISTER TINA 

Reader and Advisor 

340-2774 

NEW ADDRESS 

2236 Virginia Beach 

Blvd. 

Advisor on all problems 
of life such as marriage 
business, love affairs 
courtship, alcohol, 
or if you're sick or in need 
of help, come see Sister 
Tina. All readings private 
and confidential. Call for 
appointment. 

SPECIAL READING 
Vi PRICE 
THIS MONTH 

Corner Great Neck Rd. 
next to Hardee's London 
Bridge. Private home, 
parking facilities. 



WHAT ARE YOU WORTH? 



Its up to you. 



Ambitious men or women. None too old. 
Will train in all phases of our business. 
Salary while training. Many benefits. 
Hospitalization and Major Medical. $1,000 
per month draw plus bonus. Apply Imme- 
diately. 



6914 N. Military Highway, Norfolk. 
Apply in person after 10:00 A.M. 



8 Monummti^urial Lots 

2 choice cemetary lots, $10.00 
down, $12.00 month. Call 497- 
8571. 




n Awtafflobilcs For Sale 



"BUICK — 1962 LeSabre, 
fair condition, 1 owner, 
$175. 420 1810. 

CA*ARO — 1973 Sport, 
Green with vinyl top, 
automatic, tow mileage, 
with extras. $2970. 460 0860. 

CORVETT — 1972 Coupe; 
ail extras, like new S4400. 
call 485^3413 

CHEVROLET — 1965 SS 
impala -cmvt. — i — owner «, 
good cond. $400. or best 
offer. S8304SS aft. 5 p.m. 

CHEVROLeF"-^ 1972 
Impala Custom, fiHIy 
equipped, excellent 
cend4tiwi. Assume balance 
489 3973 

FORD — 1970 LTD Station- 
Wagon. Take over 
^yments o* %n a month 

Call 484 9J7. 



PRISONER?^ 

Are You Chained to a Desk 
or Machine 40 Hours Every 
Weeic? 

Do Bells, Whistles and 
Supervisors Control 
Everything You Do? 

Does Your Woric Lack 
Opportunity and Challenge? 

The Only Difference Between 

A Rut and a Grove Is the 

length I 

Want to Get Out of that Rut? 

What a Chance to Develop 
Your Real talents and AtiTintes 

STOP BEING A PRISONER! 

CALL 340-1317 

for an appointment. 



AUTHOR4Ze© DEALER 

Of 

T-Craft Boats 

Jack Thbrton 

AAoblle Homes 

855-2510 



^ 



43A General Instructions 



iVOICE LESSONS — 
'Beginners, advanced. James 

^rrlggj^WSi^^^^ 
44 Muiic 



32 Help Wanted Female 



GRIMES 



ICBF' 



HOOL 



GUITAR CLASSES 
In Pembroke Area 
Studenit Ttught In Small 
Gmup* According (o Afcs 
AAet 4 P.M. 499-1428 



HAIRDRESSER Si 
VIVIAN WOODARD 
BEAUTY 
CONSULTANTS. 
Immediate openings, full 
or part-time. Call Mrs. 
Vese I y, -340-3230, 420-6808. 



45 Private Instructions 

PIANO LESSONS — BA in 
music. Pocahontas Village 
near Pembrolce. 497-2035. 



58GoodTlMagiTooEat ' 

LYNNHAVEN OYSTERS 
— By the bushel, or shucked 
in their natural juice. Taste 
the difference Earl Smith 
Oyster Co., 340-5171. 947 
Hurds Rd. 

59 Firewood 

FIREWOOD-Pick-up load, 
delivered and stacked. All 
hardwood. 481-4321, 425-7867. 

62 Madiineiy And Toott-* «. 

LATHE— 18"x60", very good 
condition. $775. 855-0428. 

63 Building Materials . 

HOME Builders 8i Cdn- 
tractors - Let us help you 
with that new home, ad- 
ditions or repairs. We can 
furnish materials from 
basement to attic and aid you 
In financing. Phone 
KELLAM 8< EATON 427-3200. 



64 Bi'slness Equipment 

DICTATING MACHINES — 
one set of hwo. "DIct-A- , 
phone". Excellent condition. '^ 
464-9395, 428-9179. 

RENT OR BUY — new 8. 
used office furniture. Ex- 
rental desks $49 i, up. New 
damaged files $39 8i up. Free 
delivery. 

DESKS, INC. 
3411 High St. 397-7883 



GREAT DANE* AKC^ 

$150 and up. 1st shot. 
Wormed. 5880358. 

GREAT DANE ■ AKC 
registered, black, terms. 
428-8578 



33 Help Wanted Male 

BOYS CLUB DIRECTOR, 
Virginia Beach.. National 
Youth Serving Agency, 
J9500' plus full fringe 
benefits, 3 weeks vacation, 
degree plus 3 to 5 years 
related experience. Mail 
confidential resume to P.O. 

BOX 11101, Norfolk, 

Virginia. 23517. 
l^l^^^^g^gigp^^g^HB HAMSTERS— 2 females 

34 Help Wanted M-F with cage, very tame. $5. 
,ig^i^,gj^^^imm^mmmmm C^" '^''S- Parker, 486-3430, 

AMBITIOUS PERSONS '^'^^J^ 

WHO WANT TO EARN , ^„,^ „ . , . 

BUT CAN ONLY WORK LHASA APSO- Puppies, 8 
PART TIME. Opportunity males, 4 females, champion 
to earn $3. or more per bloodline AKC, $125. Call 
hour. Training given. Call after 4 p.m., 58B-23B3. 

for appointment onty, 497- ] 

2236 PEKINGESE - AKC, 1 

i_: , r, ■- ig. male, 1 female. Reasonably 

Large Corporation priced. 499 5176. 

expanding. Need 2 positive 

thinJting men or women. We 

prepare you to earn $125 

weekly or better, If 

qualified. Call Mr. Bailey, ■uFiirHANniSE 

499 4606 weekdays, 8;30 to ■ MhRCMAlMUiat 

10:00 A.M. 




v9~ MOvtIC IICMni6S dste 



MEN AND WOMEN — 21 to 
101. interested in 2nd 
income, part-time in your 
own home. Can earn $100. to 
$1,000. per month. For 
appointment call 587 2U34. 

PEOPLE — Ages 18 to 80. 
Can earn $100 to $1,000 per 
month part time from your 
own home. Call 428-8140. 




NEEDED 

8 People for fast growing 
business. You must 
qualify. 

499 0876 

BY APPOINTMENT 

ONLY 



51 Articles for Sale 

APPLIANCES- 
INVENTORY 
CLEARANCE SALE 
West TV Appliances, 
38 Southern Shopping 
Center, 583-5806. 

FOUR pachinko games. $25. 
apiece, $100 for all. 340-9022. 

INSULATION — V/i" full 
thick. 4.29 roll. Arco Hard- 
ware, 3365 Military hwy. 853- 
• 1379. 

52 Housetwld GoMis 



WANTED: FULL 
TIME REAL ESTATE 
SALESPEOPLE 

Better than 50 per cent 
spilt, no pressure. Good 
opportunity for the right 
people. 

R.E. Smith Real Estate, 
phone 486 1177; nights 340- 
7388. 



36 Jobs Wanted 



DINING ROOM ..SUITE— 
Mahogany, table, 6 chairs, 
corner cabinet. Very good 
condition. Call 340-5659. 

LIVING ROOM SUITE— 
Modern, 7 pieces, $400. 
Excellent condition. 340- 
83B0 _ 

LIVING ROOM SUITE — 
Green and Gold Color 
Scheme, modern decor, 
couch,' chair, coffee table, 
end table, lamp, and 2 sets of 
full length drapes. $300 or 
best offer. 425-5880. 



BOOKKEEPER — Thru 
general ledger, payroll, all 
quarterlies, manage small 
office. 855 4647. 

BABYSITTING— In my 
home, nice -yard. Hilltop 
Manor. 425 8832. 

BABYSITTING— My hflfie. 
Princess Anne Plaza Areb. 
340 8936. 

BABYSITTING — P. A. 
Plaza, in my home for 
working mothers. 
Weekdays, 486 1056. 

BABYSITTING — London 
Bridge area. For working 
motltars. ExperierK;ed. tf4- 

7843. - 

43 Loci instiuction CiMies 




ri 


t 
.-J 



IVIONTESSORI 

MUSIC 
WORKSHOP 




•«« 1 ttn r, 

n*iiM« ichc(twlin«. Cfrjlfjfd 
MontttiOfi tcKhcr ChiM in 
csnstruction (X HUpicH tttrousli 
creative »eH npmvsn Bake 
concrpti, bfginnin* pitno •> 
FORTE FsundaTMn tnaX 
«»«»l - 



TABLE — Drop leaf dining 
room, Duncan Phyfe. 428 
9179. 

53 Wanted to Buy 



Portable TV's, record 
players, radios, toy trains. 
545 6242. For the Glory of 
the Lord I 

WE NEED BADLY 
Cash paid for cameras, tape 
recorders, stereos, TV's, 
Band Instruments, 
Typewriters, guns. 

LITTMAN'S 
201 City Hall av. 622-6989 



S5TV4ago»Steiw) 

GE COLOR TV — Working 
condition. Table model. $70. 
464. 1552. 



$6 Coins 



Stamps 



BUYING 
SILVER COINS 
KFORE 1964 
PAYIN%1I5%, 
Subject to Change 
NOR VIEW COIN SHOP 
6212 SeweUs Mat Rd. 
!853:8118 



57 Jeweby * Watches 



ewehy 



TndTan" TU ff Q uo rs E 

JEWELRY — Large 

selection, low prices, 497 
4570 



<7A 



UNIFORMS — CPO type 
blues, excellent condition. 
Can !)« wwn by all enlisted. 
tS ea^. Why pay mere. 
4W-tiM. I 



BEAT THE 
FUEL SHORTAGE 

BUY AN ALL 
ELECTRIC 
MOBILE HOME 

WE HAVE LOTS 
FOR ALL 
ELECTRIC COACHES 
AVAILABLE NOW 

DELTONA 

MOBILE HOME SALES 

NORFOLK LOT 853-4564 

CHESAPEAKE LOT487"»«66 



t6Aitoyct»Stonge 



FURNITURE MOVING - 
Refrigerators, Washers, 
Dryer*, Stoves, etc. We 
move anything! 7 days a 
week — 24 hours. a day, No 
extra charge. 499-3985. 



77 Houses for Rant 



ARROWHEAD — 3 
bedroom brick, 2 baths, air 
conditioned. Couple. $200. 
497-7655. 

PRINCESS ANNE PLAZA: 

Newly painted, 3 bedrooms, 2 

bath ranch, with den and 

parage on fenced lot. Fully 

carpeted. 486-3800 or 481-6429. 

REAL ESTATE CORP. 

OFVIRGINIA 

"For the People" 

VIRGINIA BEACH- 
QUICK OCCUPANCY 
3, 4 and 5 bedroom homes in 
Thalia, Arrowhead, Mallbu, 
Green Run and Windsor 
Woods. Call 340-9722. 
BISSETT REALTY 

*G*EAT NECK ESTATES 
— 3 bedroom, 2 bath, all 
electric, all new appliances. 
$275. 481-4253. 

VIRGINIA BEACH — 3 
bedroom 2Vj bath, family 
room, fireplace, 
appliances, carpet, drapes, 
garage, all electric, 6 
month lease, $325. 427-3015. 

VIRGINIA BEACH — 
Wooded and lake front 
home; 4 bedrooms, 2 baths, 
2 fireplaces, 3 min. to NAB. 
$400. Including gardner. 
460-1203. 



78 Resort Property-Rent 

HOUSES ST 
APARTMENTS 
Available on a yearly or 
short term basis. 

DUCKS REAL ESTATE 

323Laskinrd. 

428-4882 



81 Buaiileas Places For Rent 



g3Pann>Land»TlmNt» 86 Fo» Sale Viiginia Be«Jv 



BEAUTIFUL 20 acres 8 
miles from Staunton In 
Shenandoah Valley. Very 
good buy. 486-3693, 587-4301. 




GREEN RUNCarefree 
living In this 3 bedroom end 
unit townhouse. ExcelietJt 
condition. Call Jim Sands, 
486-1533. We h'ade. HIgglns 
Realty, Inc., 486-404]. ; 

GREEN RUN — Only 
$23,000! Large 2 bedroom, 
V/i bath townhouse. Call 
Joe Robinson, 464-4839. We 
trade. HIgglns Realty,, inc., 
486-4041. 



'U For Sale Vir«inia Beacli 



ALANTON 

Shady Lady 

She's a beauty on large wood- 
ed let, open daily 3 to 6 p.m. 
4 bedrooms, 2M baths plus 
for your inspection. Harry 
Britt, 481-0955, 481-2106. 

Evergreen Realty 



72 Capella 12' X 65' with 
expansion, fully carpeted, 
drapes. Has to be movied. 
Assume balance. 
Must Sell. 499 3401 

OLYMP I C-12X65, 3 
bedrooms, furnished. Only 4 
mos. old. Owner being trans- 
ferred. Take over payments. 
425-1991. 

PACEAAAKER- 58'x10', 3 
bedroom, c«ifral air cond. 
$2300. 424-2228. 

65A Mobile Homes For Rent 

VIRGINIA BEACH — 2 
bedrooms, den, 1 child, no 
pets. 486^3999. 

66 Mobile Home Sites 



LOTS OF LOTS 

We have vacant lots immediately 
available lor eacti of our 
customers in eittier Virginia 
Beact) or Chesapeake. Forget 
problems, don't drive many miles 
each day. come buy Irom us, come 
live with 

OELTONA 
MOBILE HOME SALES 

The Dealer With Local Lots 

NORFOLK LOT. 853 4584 
Chesapeake tot, 487 88M 
CLOSED SUNDAY 



66a Mobile Homes Wanted 



TOP CASH 

PAID FOR USED 
MOBILE HOMES 



Call Jack 

at 

8552510 

Va. License 0999 



73 Apaittments-^urnished 

HARBOUR NORTH APTS. 
— New furnished and 
unfurnished 1 and 2 
bedrooms from $165. 588- 
7360. 

VIRGINIA BEACH — 
Arctic Ave. and 27th. St. 2 
bedrooms, very deluxe, 
$175. Heat, available. 622 
3867. 



VIRGINIA BEACH 

Wm\m, rat», ? room ptfktency; 
ivfl«kly and monthly ratet; cotor TV, 
b«ic Mating andcoDkinoufentils. ad 

VIRGINIAN 

MOTOR ARTS. 

310 24th St. 

428-5333 




Available 
At Once 

At our store at Hilltop 
Haza, approximately 
45 X 15 ft. space, ideal 
for coin collector or 
other varied business. 

Call 
Mr. Bonday, 

at Book-N Card, Hampton, 
Va. 

838-7813 



ARROWHEAD-Havea party 
in your 400 square foot family 
room! 4 bedrooms, 2 baths. 
Will sell VA. Call Ronnie 
Fowler, 486-1369. We trade. 
HIgglns Realty, Inc., 486- 
4041. 

ARROWHEAD— ~ 
Kempsvllle 
Immediate Possession 
Spacious 4 bedroom> split 
level, perfect condition. 
Call owner, 420-6469 
evenings. 

CARRIAGE HILL— Nice 3 
bedroom rancher with 
family room. Call Roy 
Wilkes, 486-1796. We trade. 
Higgin^ Realty, Inc., 486-' 
4041. 

I —CAPE HENRY SHrffeES- 

LARGE ANDLOVELY 

Completely carpeted 5 

bedroom ranch on deep 

water bulkheaded lot. Huge 

beamed ceiling den has 

raised hearth fireplace. 

Screened porch opens from 

eat-in. kitchen, separate 

utility room, 2 door garage. 

Owner will finance. 486- 

3800, 481-6429, 481-6866. 

REALESTATECORP. 

OFVIRGINIA 

"FOR THE PEOPLE" 

CHESOPEIAN COLONY— 
Under construction, pick 
colors and cabinets, 4 
bedroom, 2 baths brick 
ranch; attached garage, 
fireplace, on water. $70,000. 
340-2107. 

GOING, GOING, GONE! — 
Sell your home fast with a 
Sun Classified Ad! Call 486- 
3433. 



JAMESTOWN- 
Kempsvllle 
$4800 AND ASSUME - 
Spacious air conditioiped 3 
bedroom townhouse , with 
2'/2 baths. Call owner, 420- 
6469 evenings. 

LAUREL COVE — 
Spacious 2 story Dutch 
Colonial home. Den^with 
fireplace, 2'At baths. A/Vall- 
towall carpets. Many 
extras! Ted Paul in, 583- 
5976, nights 583-4078' 464- 
5042, Realtors. Member 
Metro MLS^ h 

PEMBROKE MANOR-&rge 
5 bedroom Colonial, 2pi oath, 
waterfrent, garage, faftmily 
room. 481-5298i 



WOLFSNARE 
PLANTATION -> 3 
bedroom brick ranch, 2 
baths, central air 
conditioning, fireplace, 
large lot. Any type 
financing. VA appraised at 
$36,000. Owner helps pay 
buyer's closing costs. 
Quick occupancy. Call 
Fred Soles, 340-8311, 481- 
5357. *; 



^2>.J/.w/i?«/f, 



81A OffiCM-Oesk Space 

PRIME OFFICE SPACE — 
New space available in 
modern, SUN building at 138 
S. Rosemont Rd. next to 
Expressway. Large and 
small unit for several office 
use, ready for you. Call 486- 
3430. 



SROVELAND PARK 

NEAR KING'S GRANT 

NO DOWN PAYMENT 

(VA HNANCING) 

NO ENERGY PROBLEM 

(ALL ELKTRIC) 

IMMEDIATE . 

OCCUPANCY. 

AIR CONDITIONED 

CARPETED 

WOODED LOTS 

3 BEDROOMS $32,850 

4 BEDROOMS PLUS FAMILY 

ROOM»37,500 

Located On Little Necit Rd At 

Entrance To King's Grant 

Call WalterWalesat 

486- 1385 or 420.2749 after 6 p.m. 



WOLFSNARE ACRES- 
Large 5 bedroom brick 
ranch, 3 baths, family room, 
fireplace* eat in kitchen, 2 
car garage, central) air 
condltiofilng, by owner.; 428- 
4279; ^_ 

WINDSOR OAKS — , 
BUYVA-VACANT 

3 bedroom, 2 bath, ranch 
with den. Call 425-3800, 
nights 340-4136. 

CUSTOM REALTY 

WINDSOR OAKS WEST- 
CAPTIVATING desq-ibes 
'his distinguished 3 bedmom 
brick ranch. Unbelievfable 
bedroom and family room 
sizes. Call Ellie Talanian, 
340-1690. We trade. HIgglns 
Realty, Inc., 486-4041. 

BTPo^al^CliMapjtalte 

HOLLY COVE-3 bedroom 
brick townhouse with c^tral 
air. Pay $3,975 equity and 
assume. Owner will help 
finance equity. Call Joe 
Robinson, 464-4839. We trade. 
HIgglns Realty, Inc., 486^ 
*4041. 

91 Resort Ptopnty Foi&le 

VIRGINIA BEACH — Nortti End 

GCEANFRONT 

4 bedroom, 2 bath home; 
modern kitchen, large 
screened porch. Bob 
Wainwright, Jr., 428-2515; 
499-8573; 622-4843. 

WAINWRIGHT 

MEMBER REALTORS MLS 



96 Wnted Redty EsUte^ 



COLONY PINES APTS. 



2 and 3 toeA'Oom apts. in 
exclusive adutt complex. 
tIM'and $220 monthly. Call 




I 



<^^ 



i«H 



i^Wi 



mmmm 



^^mmt 



m^ 



CONSUMER 



d^^B^bM 



Virginia Beacn Real Estate 

Where The Liyin^ 1/ Loyelip 



Financ^/Business/Economy 



Th« Sur^-Wtdnesday, 
January 23, IST^-Pag* 11 



Hdw to figure 
those precious 
miles per tank l,arasan Realty to open office 

in Chesapeake s Camelot area 



Raleigh Square opens with 
new condomiiiium lifestyle 



By Peter Weaver 



Q. When I have a tank of gas in my car, how can I 
figure how much more I can drive during the week 
without filling up again?-Mr8. F.G., Laurel, Md. 

A. First, find out your gasoline tai* capacity. If it's 
not In your owner's manual, ask your dealer. Let's 
assume the tank has a l6-gallon capacity. 

Second, go to your favorite neighborhood filling 

station and have your gas tank flUed untit the pump 

automatically clicks off. Make sure the attendant puts 

' no more gasoline in after the click-off pdnt Note your 

car's mileage and note the gas pump that was used. 



Third, drive your car until the gauge reads 

.approximately half a tank. Return to the same filling 

^station, the same pump and peiic your car in the same 

' 'spot, same directioa Why all the rigamarde? Because 

1 ^ou can get different "full" readings on your gas taiA 

if you use different pumps or park on a rise. 

,j ■ , Have the attendant fill the tardc to the pump's 

atuomatic dick-off point and no more. Note how many 

gallons it to<^ and note your mileage. If it takes around 

l-n^fight gaUons. that's half your 16-galIon tank capacity. 

: Sut, you'll rarely hit it this accurately. Divide the 

number of gallons pumped into your net mileage figure 

^present mileage minus the original figure.) 



Mind ^ur Money 



1 

Q. Will we get any appreciable savings by cutting off 
the pilot Ughts on gas stoves and af^liances?— F.F. 
Keller, Los Angeles, Calif. 

<— ' \. You won't get any appreciable saving on fuel by 
^cutting off your pilot lights, and you could create some 
7^ safety pn4>lems. Pilot lights serve two important 
.functions: U as safety devices that help control the 
n flow oi gas and 2) as automatic ignition devices for the 
'" burners. The pilot lights do generate a little heat so the 

relatively small amount of fuel they burn does provide 

a dividend. 

' As for decorative gaslights or other gas appliances 
that are not really needed, check with your gas 
company about turning them off. What ever kind of 
T' energy you're using— gas, oil. electricity— don't start 
° tinkering with basic outlets or supply points without 
^4hecking with your local utility company. 



. Q. I boughta rubber mat and put it inside the kitchen 
door on my tile (asphalt or vinyl, not sure) floor. After 
*' 'a couple of days I removed the mat and found the tile 
covered with a gummy, brown mess. I had previously 
waxed the tile. How can I get this stain off?— Mrs. 
R.A.S., Scottsdale, Ariz. 



A. According to flooring experts, you should never 
put a rubber mat on a highly pdished chemical tile 

•* floor. The foam rubber backing on many mats tends to 
hold moisture which could cause an ugly stain on 

"'vinyl asbestos, asphalt and linoleum flooring. The 
' mess soaks into the pores of the tile and is impossible to 
remove. The same caveat goes for rubber badted rugs 
and clear plastic runners: Don't use them on polished 
tile floors. Some types of pure vinyl will stain but these 
stains can sometimes be removed. 



King Features Syndicate, Inc., 1974. 



A new type of 
condominium, resembling 
single-famUy homes, has 
been unveiled with the 
opeidng of RAleigh Square 
tai the King's Grant area. 

Frank R. Spadea, 
general sales manager for 
Larasan Realty Corp., 
which developed the 
community, says the new 
units are "being extremely 
well-received. I believe we 
have a successful and 



witt) prices expected to rise, 
to the upper $)0,ooo to 
lower $40,000 range by 

SIMTlng. 

Mr. Spadea added this 
type structure will make 
condominium ownerships 
available "to a much 
larger ouritet, including 



younger families who 
wouU like to enjoy the tax 
advantages of htmte 
ownership and build equity 
in their property while not 
being burdened with the 
responsibilities of 
maintaining and caring for 
a sin^e-famlly home." 



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Larasan Realty Corp. d 
Virginia Beach will op«i its 
third district office in 
Chesapeake sometime next 
week. 

Frank R. Spadea, 
executive vice-|H^id«it, 
explained that Larasan 
decided to open a 
Chesapeake office l>ased on 
several factors, including 
the city's "remarkable 
economic growth recwd in 
the last three years, but 
principally because of 
Chesapeake's growing 
desirability as a residential 
community." 



At first, Larasan will 
operate from a bouse for 
approximately two 
mwiths, then wOl move into 
a new office in the Camelot 
Shopping Center area of 
Chempeake. 

Richard Flora, forma- 
sales nmnager of Bissett 
Realty Inc. of Virginia 
Beach, will head the 
Chesapeake office. 
Approximately 40 
employes will staff the 
office, with about half 
expected to be from 
Virginia Beach and the 
other half from 



Chesapeake, Mr. Spadea 
said. 



THE CHESAPEAKE 

off k» will be a full-service 
realty office, offering sales 
and lv(4(erage in addition 
to related real estate 
services, such as 
insurance, property 
management, securities 
and syndication. 

Mr. Spadea said that the 
Chesapeake office is the 



Napolitano selected 
for 'personality' book 



Fredepck J. Napolitano, 
a principal of the Teny 
Corp. of Virginia, has been 
selected to appear in the 
1973 edition of 

"Personalities of the 
South." 

The book, published 
annually, recognizes 
outstanding citizens who 
have contributed to the life 
of their c(Hnmunity, state 
or nation through 
professional, civic and 
community activities. 

Copies df the book are 
(daced in the Library cf 
Congress and distributed to 
colleges, universities and 
public libraries. 

Mr. Napolitano's civic 
and professional activities 
include: member of the 
executive committee and 
life director cf the National 
Assn. of Home Builda-s; 
life director and past 
president of the Tidewater 
Builders Assn.; director 
and member of the 
executive committee of 
First National Bank of 
Norfolk; trustee of St. 




NAPOLIT/ 

Mary's Infant Home; 
director of the Virginia 
Beach Besiutification 
Conunittee; director and 
secretary of the Virginia 
Beach Chamber of 
Commerce; chairman of 
the Virginia Beach 
Neptune Festival, and 
director and vice-president 
of the Virginia Beach unit 
of the American Cancer 
Society. 











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PLANNING TO SELL 
YOUR HOME? 
PRICE IT RIGHT! 

CaU us for die piofeiiiond 
mvkc yon uc looking f of . 

JOHN M. 
WRIGHT 

REALTY, INC. 

1964LASKINRD. 
VA. BEACH, VA. 
425-8702 

Members of Realtors MLS 



first of "what we hope will 
be many offices" in Uie 
tily. 

Larasan currently has 
t«Ni district offices, as well 
as additional sub-offices 
throM^out Uie area. The 
ari^»l Larasan district 
dfice is located near 
Princess Anne Plaza on 
Virginia Beaffh Boulevard. 

A second office in 
Kempsville, located in a 
new 5,000-square-foot 
building, is on Witchduck 
Road near the Virginia 
Bead) - Nwfolk Express- 
way. 



The Raleigh Square 
community contains 25 
structures, each containing 
two three-bedfbom 
condominium homes. Each 
unit is a two-story affair 
containing a private 
entrance, two-and-a-half - 
baths and modernized 
kitchens with a full line of 
appliances. 

THE HOMES ARE 
Available in two sizes with 
larger units containing an 
oversized, paneled family 
room, enclosed garage and 
raised hearth fireplace. 
Mr. Spadea said the units 
are currently priced in the 
mid to upper $30,000 range 



REALTORS MLS 

-Wo Cover Thv 
People In 
Tidewater 



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486-1423 



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Thalia Shopping Center 
4316 Virginia Beach Bhrd. 
Virginia Beach, Va. 23452 

Mike Vanoe, GRI 340-7000 Lowell Powers, 420-8802 
Jad Bias^t, GRI 340-B6S6 Lee O'bien 040-4084 
Rose Bissett, GRI 840^98 Ron Gngoiy 497-9685 

OFFICE 340-9721 



ir 



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Vlr«inta Beach. Va. 



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CHI 46IM»21 






WINNERS! 




Tom JotMWOn 



Ray Eitw 



' Jim Meyer 



REALTOR Ray Estei, GRI, annoucai that REAL- 
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were among the riecent winners tatlifactprily com- 
pleting the third and flnal week of Graduate Real- 
tors Institute (GRI) at University of Virginia, Char- 
lottesville, Va. 



B ESTES ® 

REALTY CORP. 

499-7611 

-Member Realtors MLS 



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Iconttructlon Co. 
' RHldtntlal and 
Commercial Re- 
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Improvament 

,. ^ 587-5205 

*fS^ 583-4210 



Piaitering 



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Virginia Beach 
Ptiorie 4?r 35*1 



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FARMS 

OT-lflS 4271330 



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PLASTERING4 
STUCCO 

John L. Brown 

Rt. 1, Box 1033 

Princess Anne Rd. 

Virginia Beach 

4J7 2351. 



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340-2490 



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9vifi 12-Th« Sun-Wedn«sday, Janiwry 23. 1974 



i''i-A>K^:'-- 



PersonaUty 



mmsmiim mm s mm sssiff ff sfm m f ^^ 



Former secret agents banana planter to lead CCO 



i 



By DONNA HENDRICK 
Sun Staff Writer 

The new presidait of the Virginia Beach Council of 

^ ^ic Organisations (OCO) is a former West Pdnter, 

s^jjiJis^^^^^ commissioner, ^intelligence agoit, economics 

teacher, machinery dealer, banana planter and 

television ^^cecutive. 

Th^ man who worked at those varied tradra and now 
beads ttie city's lai^est civic organizatim is Arch F. 
Coleman, who was elected in November as CCO 
president, succeeding Sam Houston Sr., now a city 
planning commissioner. 

Mr. Coleman, 74, Ya^ led a rich and active life and is 
now ready to undertake a year's woric promoting the 
V«lfare of the people oi Virginia Beach. 

As he relaxed in the comfortable livmg room ai his 
spacious home hi the Robin Hood Forest area of the city, 
sir. Coleman related anecdotes about his life and lodced 
ahead to the future of the CCO. 

"raE COLEMAN HOME sits on three acres off the 
Lynnhaven River. It is a two-story structure filled with 
antiques, overflowing bode cases, ancient ar^i,^|riu and 
famUy memorabilia. W^ 

His wife Madeline McCoy, an architect, designed the 
home 12 years ago. Their daughter, Qaudia, is a 
prttfessional artist living in Deerfield, N.H. 

In the 19205, Mr. Coleman left West Point before 
graduating because he said he didn't want to serve in the 
Army. However, by 1940, the Army wanted him back, so 
ttey enlisted him in the then-nameless group of un- 
dercover agents which later became as the OSS (Office 
of Strategic Sa:^ices). 

PRIOR TO THAT, he lived in Mexico City for 12 years 
w(Hldng as a machinery dealer and was also manager of, 
a banana plantation in Guatemala. 

Hfr also managed to squeeze in time to serve as a 
civilian with the Jouit Chiefs of Staff in Istanbul for two 
years and as a trade conunissiraer with the U.S. 
Departmrat of Commerce in Mexico for several years. 

He and his family wimnd up in Virginia Beach when 
some old Beach friends of his wanted him to plan the 
engineering for 320,000 acres of Dismal Swamp they had 
just bmight and wanted to drain for sale as farmland. 

Hien WHRO-TV, ttie k)cal public television station, 
I him to teach economics on the air, «diich he did for 




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CALL 497-4851 

STOHL REALTY 

4820 Virginia Beach Blvd. at Aragwia Bhrd. 



HELPI HELPI HELPI HELPI HELPI 

RUG SALE 

We have bought the entire stock of returns from 
a major carpet distributor and are over stocked. 
Hufry for Best Selection. 

BIG SAVINGS ON ALL SIZES 

6' X 9' Q99 12' X 12' 9Q99 

«/ up ^ «/ up 

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up 



39 



99 

up 




Just a saTnpling of t>eautiful First Quality 
Broadloom many more to choose from. 

HORRY FOITBESTSEtECTTbN ^~ 

REE PAD with DELUXE HUG 

SOM Va. acach 
Vntf.aHMwC(ina 

4974734 

Mid 9 WJ^J^ty JitJlJiiiil 6«MN.IMittqrHwy. 
Sat lk'^P*^^Ki|«S' l^**' ** ^"**' '* 

867-^23 




seven ymrs. ^fter he reached retimnent age, he 
directed the statimi's ctnomuidty relatioi» department. 

HE BECAME INTERESTED in civic ««ric wlien a 
devek^er came tq> with a {dan to build apartments and 
row houses bdiind Trantwood ESementaiy School, near 
the Cioleman home. 

The Inlyanview Civic League in Mr. Ccdonan's area 
was thai behig organized and joined fmces to oppose tte 
devdoper's plans. Mr. Coleman johoed the civic league 
and was eventually elected {nresideat. He is now (»i the 
board ol directors of the civic league. He was named a 
delegate to the CCO from the civic leagw and eventually 
elected presidrat of ttie CCO. 

His election was a surprise, he said, and he is lookii^ 
f(M*ward to a lot of hard work following in tl^ footst^ <rf 
Sam Houston, the outsp(dcen CCO president he succeeds. 

AS PRESIDENT OF the CCO, Mr. Coleman refH-esents 
membo's from 59 civic lea^ies who elect delegates to the 
CCO. In themy, he reprraents the civic interests of aU the 



210,000 residentB of Virgbda Beach, not Just the diNc 
league members. 

"Hie CCO has developed into an organteation «4iich, 
fortamatefy, Uie city authorities Ustm to," BIr. Cdeman 
said. "W6 have a great reqMnsOUUty to the dtiiKory at a 
wholie, and we are ahrays aware fliat we must include in 
our {Myograms vliat will be (rf gntlest ben^t fiv aB the 
citizens." ' 

HE WOULD ALSO like to see the many civic leagues in 
the city cMsolidate in thdr own areas, bringing loigoes 
of 10 a* 15 members together with tlCe»x small teigues to 
form larger organizations all working toward one goal. 

Mr. Coleman is personally in favor of a city charter 
change to raise the city's bondta^ limits, he said, and file 
CCO is also in favor (rf the change within certain Umits. 

"The C(X) wants smro Und of assurance that the 
apinraisal tIL value (rf real estate (on ndiich braicHng limits 
are based) is not chained at ixliim. We ateo want to 
preserve the right ctf the peq;)le to vote on critical 
things," he said. 



THE CCO IS pleased also that the c*^[]*2^^^ 
I»rtiensive Zoning ttPdinance has been adi^led, he saic^ 

becMise the dvic leapitt now haw "sometfaii9 (m «1iic^ 

to base aU their plaining." J 

»fr. Coleman's COO predecessor forecast a year of 
hard work for the new presidait , ,. „^ ,i 

"It's ahirays a tough job for the president of the CCO, | 
Saitf'Houstmi said. "Just look ahead. We have a city fl| 
210,000, and afl of its public facilities, its school8| 
recreatton, sowage, are at capacity. ; 

"Hie ci^f council cries that they need mwe fuwls. t 
don't thhik ttiere's any questitm we need mcnre mon^« 
The cpesticm is how we will get it. | 

"Are you interested in tennis courts, a dvic center| 
new sciMMls and M^ways? What about the areas of to\M[| 
that have had no sewers for 25 years while the nem 
condiHniniums have Uiem? ? 

"It's a question of priorities. And this is what lieC 
atead fin- Arch Coleman," Mr. Houston said. - 

"I ttiink he can handle it with his bacl^round," he 
continued. "He's had a suc<;e^ul life." '• 



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4ii) Year No. 5 




V .^ 







'Lord a 
cy,' 
see p. Br I 




■ "ta'C^ 



City Of Virginia Beach, Va. 



Wednesday, January 30, 1974 



e Copyright 1974 . 
BMCh Pubtlihing Corp. 



15 Cents 





"Virginia Beach: An Emerging City," the city's 
first filmed annual report made its debut Monday 
night before about 100 persms in the Virginia Beach 
City Council Chambers. 

The22-minute film accents the importance of the 
tourism indietry in the city and touches upon city 
government, the signing of the water contract, new 
developments in schools and libraries and the 
building of a mountain of trash. The city has 
published^a program to accompany the film which 
includes a summary of city revenue sources and 
expenditures, a comparison of the cjty 
revenue sources arid expenditures, a comparison 
of the city's debt with other large Virginia cities and 
a list of 21 items and statistics to recall about the 




emerges 



year 1973. 

The fUU-color film, produced by Premier 
Productions, begins with a sunrise over the ocean 
and the first settlers in the Beach and capsules the 
city's growth and development over the past year. 
Tlie entire report is narrated by Nore Martin, 
known for his portrayal of Adam Thoroughgood. 

THIS IS THE city's first attempt at producing a 
filmed annual report. The goal is for every Beach 
resident to see tiie film sometime during the year. 
The idea for the filmed report was tal(en from a 
similar filmed feport produced in Corpus Christi, 
Tex. City Manager Roger Scott stated that statistics 
showed Uiat where 60 per cent <rf the people in 
Corpus Christi could remember something about 



their filmed report, only 30 per cent of persMis 
surveyed in the Beach could recall anything about 
last year's printed annual report. 

the film will now be available for public viewing. 
Special showings in the city council chambeR today 
and tomorrow are geared to get civic leadtfa 
interested in scheduling the film for their clubs. The 
film may be viewed at 10:30 a.m., 12:15 p.m., 1:16 
p.m. 3:30 p.m. and 8 p.m. in the chambers. After 
that time, civic clubs, school classes or oOj» 
interested groups may arrange a film showing h«e 
of charge. A member of the city staff will also be 
available upon request and answer questions 
following Uie report. The film and speaker may be 
scheduled by calling the city's Public Informatien 
Office at 427-4111. 



Leaving your cares behir^d 



Therf! is no question bassist Ivan 
Srnallev l(nows how to enjoy 
"getting away from it' all," by 
combining his love of music wiUi 
that'Oflhe outdoors. Mr. Smalley 
ii»ok advantage of a warm, sunny 



spring-like day to set up a make- 
shift music stand on the secluded 
hanks of Linkhorn Bay for a 
practice session with his bass 
fiddle. (Sun photo by Rod Mann) 



Beach project faces veto 

^1 



ByCILESINEX 
Sun Washington Bureau 

WASHINGTON - The U.S. 
Senate has voted to authorize 
nearly a million dollars to 
design a massiye Virginia 
Beach erosion control project, 
but some Capitol Hill observers 
say the White House may veto 
Qie measure. 

The reason fm a possible veto 
would have nothing to do with 
the Virginia Beach project, but 
rather with other controversial 
provisions in the biU oi which 



the Virginia project is only a 
part. 

The Water Resources 
Development Act, which 
authorizes the spending of 
$954,000 to plan extensive beach 
improvements for Virginia 
Beach, also authorizes an 
outdated low interest rate on 
borrowed money for ongoing 
projects in other regions. 
Accra-ding to a Republican staff 
member of the Senate Public 
Works Committee, the White 
House may also object to an 
increase in authorizations for 16 



Life term given in 
shooting, robbery 



Alphoise D. Ruiz, described 
by police as an itinerant from 
New York's Spanish-Harlem, 
was sentenced to life in prison 
Jan. 23 for the January 1973 
shooting and robbery of Emmitt 
Young. £. ,5 

The incpent occuired on tw 
night Mb. [Ruiz arrived' in 
Virginia BOich shortly after he 
was invited by Mr. Young to his 
Waves Motel room for dinner. 

During his trial last 
September, Mr. Ruiz, 25, pled 
guilty to shooting Mr^ Young, 
34, five times in the head witii a 
small caliber pistol, robbing 
him of. $185 and stealing his 
pick-up truck. ' 

CIRCUIT COURT Judge 
Philip L. Russo decreed a life 
sentence for the robbery, plus 
prison terms of 20 years for the 
shooting and five yearr for the 



truck theft The 20 and five 
years prisons terms will be 
served concurrently with the 
life sentence. Mr. Ruiz could be 
paroled in 15 years, f 

ST. Young lost 0^ eye ai^d 
tevdr^ dis»led as a 
result of the sbootiig. On the 
ni^ht of the incident he was 
bound and left alone in his motel 
room as Mr. Ruiz fled in his 
truck after the shooting. He 
managed to free himself, leave 
the motel and hail a passing 
police car at the intersection of 
23rd Street and Atlantic 
Avenue. 

Mr. Ruiz was apprehended a 
few weeKB later in Tampa, Fla., 
by police «dio recognized him 
and Mr. YsEing's truck from 
descriptions in a bulletin 
circulated by Virginia Beach 
police. 



ongoing river basin projects. 
None are in Virginia. 

THUS VIRGINIA BEACH 

could be an innocent victim for 
the second time of a legislative 
mixture of controversial and 
non-controversial provisions. If 
the president dislikes some of 
the provisions in a bill, they 
must all get the axe. It 
happened jpst that way a year 
and a half ago. 

In the meantime, however, 
design work may begin in about 
two months on the Virginia 
Beach scheme. 

The U.S. Corps of Engineers 
can accomplish this work by 
using "discretionary funds" 
while it awaits the hoped-for 
appropriation and White House 
approval. 

After the Senate vote on Jan. 
22, the bill must go before a 
House-Senate conference 
committee, whose members 
will iron out differences In the 
versions of the legislation 
passed in the two chambers. 
The bill passed with 78 senators 

THE RESULTING measure 
will be submitted to a further 
vote in the Senate and House in 
the form of an appropriation 
bill, probably net until summer. 
If it passes, it will go to the 
White House to be signed into 
law or vetoed. A presidential 
veto could be overriden by the 
Congress. 

The Virginia Beach project 
has no opposition in the White 
House or in Congress, according 
to the PublicWorks Committee 
staff memberr 

Only one other new project — 
in Colorado — would receive 



more design money tHarf the 
Virginia Beach project, 
according to the authorization 
made last week. Local 
participation would involve the 
city's acquiring ^ land, 
easements and rights • oi - way 
and providing half of the 
eventual consti-uction costs, or 
about $1.76 million. Virginia 
Beach would eventually be 
required to provide more than 
$4 million for hurricane and 
flood protection. 

Under the authorization the 
United States Army Corps of 
Engineers would provide a 100- 
foot-wide beach elevated to 10 
feet above sea level for six 
miles of shore, between Rudee 
Inlet and 89th Street. The 
elevated beach would be 
reinforced with sheet pile wall, 
stone riprap and concrete cap. 
Existing sand dunes in this area 
would be raised and 
strengthened as part of the 
project. 







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Closed 
council 

The Virginia Beach City 
Council met Monday for 40 ^ 
minutes In closed letilon, 
open to neither the public 
nor the press. The agenda 
listed the only Item for. 
dlicuislon a« a "legal" 
matter. In four meetings to 
far this year, the council 
has met for a total of two 
hours and 49 minutes 
behind closed Aoor%. 




T td prison 
in infant's death 

Judge Philip L. Russo has revdced the probation of a 
young mother convicted of involuntary manslaughter 
and decreed that she spend three years in prison. 

Nearly a year ago, Ms. Sharon M, Harris, 18, was 
convicted of smothering her three-month-old daughter 
with a pillow in their Karen Lane home in an attempt to 
make the infant stop crying and was placed on three 
years probation. 

Judge Russo said he revoked the probation because 
Ms. Harrus repeatedly violated conditions of her 
probation. 



MASS TRANSIT 



f s 



for the Beach 
ihere isn't any, 

but a new study 

|(iay remedy that 

I ^ — 



Stranded and 81 ^ 
\e leads crusade 



The public has taken jp the crusade for 
Ijublic transportation in Virginia £^ch. 
Leading that crusade is 81-year-old Tarol 
Hunt 

Since Uie beginning Of a Carolina 

ailways bus drivers' strike in early 

imber, Mrs. Hunt and other Citizens 

ive found themselves stranded at home 

use of a lack of publicf transportation. 

resident of the Mayflower Apartments, 

Hunt last week gathered a petition 

ith 350 signatures of apartment dwellers 

area businessmeai who also have been 

^^onvenienced by the strike. Sara 

Hughes, also a resident of the Mayflower 
Apartments will iM-esent that petition 
Mraiday to the Virginia Beach City 
: auncil. 

\** A ladt of public transportation in the 
#fty has caused many bysinessmen 
concern that their empires will not be 
le to get to work— and likewise, many 
iployes are cwicerned about losing their 
during the strike. While many persom 
ive tried to f<MTn car pools, others must 
to cabs and paying fares that (^n be 
much as $10 «>e way to downtown 
folk from tl» Beach Borou^. 
When warned at this week's nrteeting 
Wm tHc petition was craning, the city . 
dMncilmen seemed baffled as to what they 
couM do to spe^ n^(^atioie between thie 
union strikers and bus company cfficiab. 
They indicated they wMild favor a 
resduUon to Carolina Trailways officiak 
cxfressii^ the need for the return <rf bus 
service to the city. 



By LINDA MILLER 
Sun Staff Writer 

Many persons turn up their nose at the 
mention of mass transportation. They feel 
there could never be a transit system with 
the liucury and convenience of ttieir 
automobile. 

But, in the midst of a Carolina Trailways 
bus drivers' strike and an ever-growing 
gasoline shortage, area cities are 
preparing to undertake a comprehensive 
transportation study to deveolop a transit 
system that will meet the demands of the 
individual. The study will try to answer 
where the potential users of the system are 
located and where Uiey are goii^, as well 
as what their {HioriUes (such as time 
schedules or lower fares) are for any mass 
. transit system. 

The $480,000 study will be funded 
primarily by federal money through the 
Urban Mara Transit Authority (UMTA). 
and state money from the Virginia 
Department of Highways. It will provide a 
guide for the Southeastern Virginia 
Planning District (SVPDC) to ^tablish a 
workable regional transportaticm system 
with the aid of the Tidewater Tran- 
sportation District Commission. TTie study 
area will include Virginia Beadh, 
Chraapeake, Norfolk, Portsmouth and 
Suffolk. 

THE STAFFS ot the area cities have 
prepared the outline for the shidy, whk^ 
mu^ no^ go to the ex«:utive oHnmi^;^ of 
SVPDC and then to the Virginia DeparT- 
mmi ot Highways and UMTA fw final 
approval bef(H% ccmsultants Wilbur Smith 
and ^sociat^ can actually bi^ln the 
mechanics erf the study. The fiipl study 
proposal will indwie an imm^Uate im- 
IM^vCTnent plan for pressit transp(Mtati(m 
systems in tte citi^ and a five-y^r trai^t 
devek^nnent program for the r^on. 

As the outline reacib now (before possible 
"cfiai^l^ VDM •radtJMTAt, tou r s p ecifi c 
tran^mrtation af^roaches will be con- 
sidered in the Beach, these inchMie a 
Beach ^mx^ circulator system in ttie 
summer, a rapd b-ai^ system, a pamaal 
transit syston ami a cmnmute' ecpress 
ta« ^rrtem b^wem the Brach and l^tarfift. 



Beach Borough 
Circulator System 

From the end of May to September the 
Beach is bombarded by tourists: T'he study 
of the Beach Borwjgh is expected to detail 
alternatives for meeting tte summer 
demand on traffic in the resort area. Under 
study will be (he existing pedestrian, 
bicycle and motor vehicle circulator 
problems. Consultants will identify the 
origins and destinations of those travelers 
in the resort area. (Are they merely trying 
to get from one end of the resort strip to 
the other, or do they want to go to Norfolk 
Sc<^?) The study wiU also develop a time 
schedule for implementing any type of 
summer demand system— be it bus, 
monorail or some other modification to the 
area's traffic pattern. 

"The concept of a summer system is 
basically sound, "says Vice-mayor Reid 
Ervin, a representative to the Tidewater 
Tran^wrtion District Commission. "But, 
two privately owned transportation 
systems have tried that and so far have 
never been able to put it t(%ether. After 
further study of what's neected tt»ere, I 
wmild still favor seeing it tried." 

RapMTranstt 

A rapid transit system cmild take the 
form of a monorail or re-estaWishment (rf 
the train service (or some system utilizing 
the railroad tracks) along the old ScNithem 
Railway Co. right-of-way. A complete 
study will be dene <rf the rail c<HTidor 
betwe«] Vii^inia B^ch and Norfolk. The 
c(MTi(Jk>r inchxte the Virginia Beach- 
N<Hf(rik Toll R(Md, ttie Southern Railway 
Co. right-of-way and Virginia Beacb 
Boulevard. 

Studies of the corridor will evaluate the 
problems (rf the east-w^t traffic flow and 
are exfeebed to aiwwo- whether a rapid 
tran»t syston coi^ aesrve as a ivtncipal 
mode of travel between Nwfdk and Uie 
Beach. Aiso uneter the consid«-ation will be 
Wtrettief tlfc ben&tits trf ttie system- 
would justify the expene <rf develc^ng the 
rail cwridw. 

"It sounds line an eccitin g idea" says 
l^juncilman Dr. C^arerwe nErt!Mid;~1hr 
city's repres«jtative to the executive 
committee of SVPDC. "Possibly a 
mMWitiil would be b^ter Oan putting the 
traiiB tHNdc on the trueia amidnring ttie 
saf^y problem of the traim cro«rir^ all the 
ro^b in the city." 



Personal Transit 



Imagine daillng the phone and having a 
bus pick you up at your door or from the 
office. It's possible with a personal transit 
system— but whether it's possible in the 
Beach remains to be seen. 

There are several alternatives for a 
personal transit system (or demand 
responsive system). It could be a special 
commuter service from one section of the 
Beach to an industrial park or a Naval 
base. It could be an answer to the prd)lems 
with transportation tor the elderly or the 
handicapped And it could help solve part of 
the city's traffic congestion. 

One system already working in 
Rochester, N.Y., relays calls from a 
central dispatcher to b^es by computer. 
The bus is routed to pick up iMissengers that 
are going to the same general area from 
one part of town. The fare is $1 (no matter 
where you are going) and decreases if 
other members of the same family also are 
taking the bus. Rochester also has 
developed a personal transit system to 
provide daiiy bus service and to a local 
industrial plant. Customers in an area were 
solicited and routes devised to stop at an 
individual home to take him to and from 
woric. 

The prddlem in Vii^inia Beach may be 
the la^e land area of the city. And the 
problem with most personal transit 
systems is that they lose money. Tte study 
will show the possibilities of the personal 
transit system on a small scale as well as 
one to cover most <rf the cit^. But what it 
may come down to is whether the Beach 
residents wants the convenience of the 
demand-responsive systembadly ei)ough 
to finance the service. 



Bus Express 
To Norfolk 

With the number (rf persons who com- 
itnite daily befrw^ the Beach and Noriblk, 
it would seem that some sori of bus ex|Mess 
transit between the two citi^ would be 
feasable. 

IvCSUIUI inn 11 inc VApil^s Clipsrwitlrlti 

from Priw^ss Anne Plaza Siq^ing Ctait«- 
to the N(fffolk central bisin^ district aee 
incom^ete nnce the so^we was halted t^r 
Ole Carcttna Ttrthwisw bus driver's steike. 
But even tluit rnrrke was nM attracting aU 
(rf its poto^ttal riders. 



The entire study, which will take at least 
a year to complete, will be geared to find 
out what the public wants. Telephone 
surveys, direct mail quest iona ires and 
mwtihgs with different interested groups, 
will provide input for the study and 
hopefully answer questions like what type 
of transit service is needed, where is it 
needed, how much fare are people willing 
to pay and how much time might they be 
willing to give up. Whatever type of service 
is finally recommended, the system would 
be owned by the regional planning district 
and either operated by the region or l^sed 
to a private firm. Those too, are quesG^s 
the study is supposed to answer. 

BUT, THE Tidewater Transportation 
Disfrict Commission is not waiting for the 
completion of the study to get bus service 
for the Beach. They have already asked the 
General Assembly for $5.7 million to 
purchase Community Motor Bus (a charter 
service) and Norfolk's Tidewater Metro 
Transit. It is hoped, if those services can be 
purchased they will be expanded into 
Virginia Beach and Chesapeake some time 
this year. , 

Many legislators and various 
organizations have sp9ken in favor (rf 
devel(^ing mass transportation dnd tiding 
to find sonle other answer to highway 
congestion than more highway con- 
struction. But there is tlw question as to 
whether \he people of the area are 
ready to accept mass transit as a means 
of travel. 

"AS YOUNG as we "are (the city (rf 
Virginia Beach), I'm not sure we are ready 
for it at this time," says Dr. Holland. "Most 
peopte haven't lived here 10 years, atKl 
most (rf them aren't accustomed to usii^ 
{ublle transportation. Once the txb€b 
become nwre clogged and more (rf a 
pr^lem, it (mass transit) will become an 
accepted thii^. It's jmt now beginning to 
get hard to g^ aroutui, but not to the point 
that people are ready to give up their own 
automobile for fmblic^transportation." 

Mr. Ervin agr^ that "Virginia Beach 
isn't goii^ to be able to devetop a transit 

automobiles. " 

But, if {Hice increase and slKxIi^es (rf 
fuel continue, mass tran^wrtatkwi may 
bec(Mne more than the words in a study— it 
may be a pa-am's (mly means (rf Iran- 
sportati(Mi. 




Paga A-2-Tht 8un-W«ln«day, January 30, 1974 



They're not 
forgotten 



I 

Just one year ago Sunday, the Viet Naip 
cease fire was signed, and the families of 
POWs and MIAs were tdd that the 
servicemen would be returned or accounted 
for. But once the televised POW homecoming 
was over, hopes diminished for an accountii^ 
of the missing in action. 

Whai the peace treaty was signed, the 
Pentagon listed 1,315 men as MIA. Last Fri- 
day, the Defense Department still listed 1,138 
mm unaccounted for. 

They're not forgotten, so it might be well to 
remind President Nixon of his promise that 
"under no circumstances shall we abandcm 
our MIAs." 

For the famiUes of those servicemen still 
listed as missing in action, the war is over only 
for tl)ose who died in it. 



CiiysMe 

ByLhtdaimiw 

Putting the 'zap' 
in a moratorium 



2AP. PAUSE. GONG, OPERATION PLUM. If 

you hear such words being whispered around the 
city administration building, it's no big plot by the 
city officials nor any sort of super secret. They're 
all strange names that mean a 60-day moratorium 
on housing jn Virginia Beach. 

The ci^ staff has been working overtime to 
bring in an appropriate name for the moratorium — 
other than moratorium. So far, they've come up 
with names like ZAP (Zoning and Planning), 
PAUSE (Planning and Use System Evaluation), 
GONG (Growth or Noj Growth) and OPERATION 
PLUM (Planning Lai4d Use Methods). It's all an 
effort to get the staff psyched up for work meetings 
during the moratorium as they try to come up with 
growth information that the city council requested. 





WITH THE aniiouncement of the 60-day 
moratorium on residential housing applications, 
the Virginia Beach Planning Department was 
instructed to concentrate their efforts to comeup 
with a "plan for planning." No y/here could you'find 
a group better suited than the planning department 
to plan for a plan. 

OVErtFLOW CROWDS at pubUc hearings and 
Virginia Beach City Council meetings recently 
have left many citizens standing in the corridor 
outside the chambers wondering exactly what was 
happening in the meeting. But, no longer — the city 
is installing a public address system. The system 
will echo through the halls (and in the press room) 
to let everyone hear the comments of other citizens, 
lawyers and councilmen — even if the chambers 
are full. 

The wiring for the new system was completed 
last week. It was done through the present speaker 
system that exists to pipe music into the halls and 
various offices. (It seemed a simple task, since the 
speakers were already there, and one wonders why 
it wasn't done before.) 

Now, if someone would only sneak in and wire 
that same speaker system to the city manager's 
conference room where the city couikU holds its 
weekly closed s^sion, no one wmild wonder what 
was going on in there either. 

* 

MURRAY MALBON found out last week that a 
city council member's words may come back to 
haunt him. Poor Mr. Malbon, it seems if the press 
doesn't catch him, the public will. 

Garv Burcham, appearing at the council on 
behalf '^ residents in the Kings Grant area who 
opposed multi-family zoning in 1hat area, caught 
Mr. Malbon by a quote he made Dec. 9. 

"Your fellow councilman Murray Malbon 
seconfcd the motion for denying townhouses on the 
same site we are discussing today," Mr. Burcham 
i(Ad I he council. "And I quote, 'we have got to be 
raiided by the wishes (rf the people.' " 
^ Mr. Malbon blushed as Mayor Cromwell 
jokingly added at the end of Mr. Burcham's 
|K-esentati(Mi, "Y«i di<to't leave Mr. Malbon much 
choice, did you?" 

But, the peqfde's wishes were followed, and the 
nming was change to prevent the buDding of 
midti-family dweihng nmts in the ar^ wmi 
Malbon bowing again to the people's wiriiw. 



Wi 



OAVWRDCAR HCAL WITTOM IHMS 




SONONAUAOLOAMW l«ATTt«W 0. 6IBOI1 MIKSCj^WI 



(•MadW^ 



MACM n»UW*NC eOWWATION 



Passing cars 

offer quick, 

free showers 

Though the weaUier hat 
been nnseasoiuibly warm 
for January, the Beach has 
alio seen more thaa Its 
share of clondy, ratay days 
this month. Low-lying 
portions of many streets 
seem to have 'taraed into 
small rivers, and motorists 
find themselves spraying 
thek way across town. Pity 
the poor nedestrian or 
other passing drivers who 
get caught in the free 
shower. (Sun photo by Lou 
Roberts) 



' ■ 

Grime in office : probing public officials 



Hiy LAWRENCE VELVEL 
Special to The Sun 

The public opinion polls show 
that confidence in public of- 
ficials is soaring to new lows. 
This is4iardly surprising, since 
we are confronted daily with the 
misdeeds of officials ranging 
from the policeman on the beat 
to the chic^ lawbreaker in the 
White House. It almost seems 
that government officials are 
intent on proving once again the 
truth of a statement made by 
Chief Justice Hughes in 19S1: 
Since the early days of the 
country, he said, "the ad- 
ministration of government 
has become more complex, the 
opportunities for malfeasance 
and corruption have multiplied, 
crime has grown to most 
serious proportions, and there is 
the danger of its protection by 
unfaithful officials and of the 
impairment of the fundamental 
security of life and property by. 
criminal alliances and official 
neglect." 

The suspicion of official 
misconduct naturally creates a 
demand that the alleged per- 



Lawrenca Velvet teaches 
Constitutional Jaw tor tiie 
Catholic University Schcxd of 
Law in Washington, D.C. 



petrators be investigated and 
punished. The investigation can 
take various forms. L^islative 
bodies can investigate, as does 
the Watergate Committee. 
Grand Juries can investigate, as 
is customary in this nation. 
Admhiistrative mvestigations 
can be held by executive of- 
ficials to determine whether 
government employes or 
government contractors have 
engaged in corrupt conduct. But 
no matter the form of the in- 
vestigation, one may be iure 
that the people vho are being 
investigated will often claim the 
Fifth Amendment privilege 
against self incrimination when 
they are called upon to testify 
about their ^ssible miscon- 
duct. Such a claim was, indeed, 
involved in a recent New York 
case, Lefkowitz v. Turley, 
which the Supreme Court 
decided on Nov. 19, 1973. 



THERE ARE two parts to 
Fifth Amendment claims like 
the one in Lefkowitz. One part is 
the argument that the party 
being investigated cannot be 
forced to testify so long as the 
evidence h^ gives could be luped 
against him in a later crimmal 
[voceeding. With this argum4|^ 
the SuiH-eme Court has agree!, 
both in Leflrowitz and in prior 
cases. Regt^rdless of wliether 



When government^ it- 
self, becantes the law- 
breaker, then there is 
the danger that crim- 
inal conduct will be 
protected by unfaith- 
ful government offic- 
ials. 



give might be used as a basis for 
firing them from their govern- 
ment jobs or discharging them 
from their government con- 
tracts. And they also say that 
since they can't be forced to 
testify as to their possible 
criminal conduct, they cannot 
be fired from their jobs if they 
refuse to testify about such 
conduct. 



the investigatory proceeding is 
a civil or criminal one — 
regardless of whether the in- 
vestigation is being conducted 
by a grand jury, a city com- 
missioner, or what have you — 
the Court has said that a witness 
cannot be made to testify unless 
he is granted immunity from 
any later prosecution based on 
the evidoiie he jflves. This 
seems fair enough, since the 
privilege against self in- 
crimination would be {H-etty 
meaningless if people could be 



forced to give testimony «*ich 
could then be' used as a basis for 
convicting them. 

The other part of Fifth 
Amendment claims like those in 
Lefkowitz is slightly more 
complicated. In essence, people 
argue that, even if they are 
granted the necessary im- 
munity from . criminal 
prosecutim, they still cannot be 
forced to testify as to th«r 
possible criminal activity, since 
the evidence they are foroed to 



Forum 




+ 



Letters from 
our readers 



Local Watergate 



Sir: 

I recoitly attended the National 
Assn. of Home Builders meeting in 
HtHibttm, where we discussed the 
urgent need of providing hmising for 
all Americans and the realted 
prdalems of acconmtodating those 
needs to senile growth. Having 
returned, I fiiKl it disti-essing and 
tragic ttiat the majority of the 
Virginia Beach City Council saw fit — 
during our absence — to play politics 
with the lives and financial well-being 
of our citizens. 

We find, tmfortunately, that the 
same type of manipulation, un- 
deii^am! deals and all tte ac- 
compar^ic^ ugliness that surromded 
Wat»gate has b^ transferred mm 
to our local scene. AccwiUiig tnpress^ 
r^xHTts, city councilmen and otfa«s 
secr^y met in a restaurant to decide 
who should sit m our stqiposedly 
^efeseionaHy-^smptraed- Virginia 
Beach Planim^ CXsmmission — in 
effect, r^acii^ old machine politics 
with new and mtve-sinistor machine 
politics. We do MM bcJie ve, that in this 
day andl^, mnWeai^mc^taasj^ 
Vii^inia Be^h am be det^ved l^ 
pditical dtaly trida ^Nfied by Ok^ 
moatCMvims. Tho« couMlta^ and 
obor irtw are using 'im growa" to 
btttim ther pt^tit^l amfaitkMB are 
(ttw»ti^ sMatiaa btm VbeAr Wiure 
to properly frian and ^tivitfe Oe 
a^mlt Md atrvtoM to 



meet the needs of our expandii^ 
population. 

To use one of the largest industries 
in the city as the scapegoat fw the 
council's failure is to wreck havoc 
with the economy of our local 
government. The result is the loss of 
income to every business in the 
commimity and, furthermore, the loss 
of jobs for countless citizens. 
IiMvitably, this will lead to un- 
necessary higher taxes. It is past time 
for the responsible members of our 
community to step forward and put an 
end to this type of irresponsibility. 
Then and only then can sanity be 
restored to city government. 

Ted S. Schlossman 

President, 

Tidewaters BuUdo-s Assn. 



For charter change 



their tirue concerns. Many issues will 
be coming before aU committees of 
the Senate and the House of 
Delegates. I will be serving on 
Agriculture, General Laws, and 
Corporations, Insurance and Banking 
committees. If yoO have specific 
questions or viewpoints during the 
two months we are in session, please 
write to me as follows: Glean 
McClanan, House of Delegates, the 
Virginia General Assembly, Eight 
Street Office Building, Richmond, 
Vir^nia 23219. (Hi Saturdays and 
wedcends I shall be available at my 
office and home in Viiiginia Beach. 
Elected representotivies can only 
reftect the attituttes d their con- 
stituency insofar as they are informed 
of those opinions. I shall lo<^ toward 
to hearing from the citizmis of 
Virginia Beach again this year as I 
have in the past for their guidance 
and direction in matters of coiK^em to 
t^em. - 



THERE WAS a time, in 1967, 
when there appeared to be some 
danger that the Suiweme Court 
might ticceft these arguments. 
Such acceptance would have 
been dangerous to decent 
government (assuming that 
decent government is possible, 
whid) is a big assumption these 
days). For acceptance would 
have meant that investigators 
would have been unable to 
question public officials about 
possible criminal misccMiduct 
even though this misconduct 
involved gross dishonesty or is 
dangerous to life and safety — 
as is the case, for example, 
v^en the cops become the 
robbers. Evidaice of miscon- 
duct would have had to be ob- 
tained from sources other than 
the alleged miscreants, but 
siio^ evidence can sometimes 
b^very ditticuU to get. The 
miscreants would have con- 
tinued in Oieir job', whUe having 
to say nothing about their ac- 
ttons to investigators. 

'Is 

Fortunately, in 1968, and 
again in Lefkowitz, the 
Supreme Court has ruled 
againist these broad claims 
which would have totally im- 
munized officials from 
testifying about irassible 
misconduct. The Court has 
made clear that once public 
officials are givoi the requisite 
immunity from later criminal 
prosteution, they can be made 
to testify about their official 
conduct, can be discharged 
from their jobs on the basis of 
the evidence obtained from 
their testimony, and can also be 
discharged if they refuse to 
testify. 

Thus the Court has arrived at 
a good balance between the 
requiremaits of the privilege 
against self incrimination and 
the requh'ements of clean 
government. There are, 
however, some interesting 
questions which remain to be 



answered. The most exotic ones 
concern impeachnjent. If the 
President were caUed upon to 
give evidence to a House 
committee investigating 
whether there should be a bill of 
impeachment, or to the Senate 
during an impeachment trial, 
could he refuse to give this 
evidence unless be received 
immunity from any later 
prosecution based on it? "Hie 
rules discussed above would 
indicate that the answer to this 
question is yes. And the answer 
may be yes even thou^ the 
Constitution explicitly in- 
dicated that a ccmvictmn on a 
bUl of impeachment is no bar to 
a later crimfaial prosecution. 
After all, the fact that im- 
peachment proceedings are 
brought does not mean that thcT 
defendant toses all his rights. 



Sir: 

As a citizen of Virginia Beach for 
the last ten years, I feel compelled to 
state my opinion on the issue of 
chahgii^ the city charto' to increase 
the city's bonded indeUedness. 

We in Virginia ^ach must face 
the reality that we reside in a 
populous and growing, city; 
ttieref(»«, we must decide to plan our 
city's future in a systematic and 
orderly manner. The proposed 
charter change would, first, allow us 
to provide ne«)ed services; second, 
the charter change wmild place us in a 
better positim compart with other 
municipalities in ttie CmnmcHiwealtfa 
in re^cd to issuaxM^ oi bmuk. 

I siiKarely hope that we will ^low 
conRdence in mir etocted trfficials and 
mpport than im ttis ttnportant 
matto-. 

K. Edwin BrMPB 



Wanted: your views 



'ar: 

TlM Geoati A»emUy of Vii^nia 
will have oqimeiiced its first full 
w^ in seskn ttiis weA. It is of 
i^no^ impMtanoe that dtixem of 
Virginia Beiu^h take the tiiM to 1^ 
their altctod u'|j i * i pn ta H vw know 



Gleon McClanan. Member 

Virghiia House of Delegates 

from Virginia Beach 



'Black Monday' 



Sir: 

We should iK>t fcH^et that Jan. 22 
was the fir^ anniversary ci Black 
Monday, the day the U.S. Supreme 
Cmirt ^ued its (Vision legalizii^ 
alMrtion. 

How many untwm lives have been 
destroyed since that decision we do 
not kmvw. If the people cannot have 
compassitm for unborn infants, thai 
they shmild be made to see tibat they 
are the coming victims trf the anti-life 
moven^its. 

Renewed eifatts should be made to 
hris^ abmit a reversal of the decision 
aiid iff pass a ' C(»istttutioimi am^id- 
ment to protect the ri^ts of the un- 
born. 



wmmKrmuimmu 



ne Sun wekoma M letters pom io nod- 
en. Names wttl be withkeU on reiptest, but 
l^eoie mcbi<k your unu and tekphoM mtm- 
ber t^th your letter. Lettai ore mbject to 
editing to mmt new^i^er style end ^mce re- 
guirtmenit Write: Forum. I^im Betch &tn, 
IJS Rommmt Rd.. VwgMa B^ch, Va. 2S4S1 



How to subscribe 




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their personal copies of The Sun by 
mail. 

If you with The Sun to be mailed 
iveekly to your home or business, mail 
us the coupon and service will begin 
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Please Mail Tlw Sun To: 



is noqij^ 



BUT SUPPOSE the President 
received the necessary im- 
munity, yet still refused to give 
evidence. Would this refusal in 
its^ be caiffie for conviction on 
a bill of impeachment? Here the 
answer is probably no, even 
though the rules of Lefkowitz ^ 
and former cases would ih'^j^ 
dicate that tiie answer 
The reasrni the answer 
that the Constitution stipulatfl 
that an impeachment lies only 
for treason, bribery and other 
high crimes and. misdemeanors, 
and a mere Prudential refusal 
to give evidmce would not 
constitute any of these things. 
In order for the r^usal to rise to 
the level of an impeachable 
offense, the Congress or the 
courts would have to rule that 
the President's failure to give 
evidence constituted criminal 
contempt of Congr^. 

The existence of these 
foregoing questions involving 
impeachment shows that there 
is yet some way to go before we 
have a full picture of the 
ultimate balance which must be 
struck between the 
requirements of decent 
govemmait on the one hand 
and the privilege against self 
incrimination on the other. But 
Lefkowitz and its predecessors 
provide a common sense 
blueprint for reconcUing these 
competing interests. If such 
common sense continues to 
prevail, then we can have some 
confidence that a reasonable 
balance will be struck in future 
cases as well as in past ones. 



-| 



r* 



Ntfne 



( 

] Address 



City 



Stun 



Zip 



I 1Yr.$0() 6Moi.$4.5QO 3 Mos. $2.50 ( ) ! 



'A 



HASSLES 




Denton assumes 
command at local 
military college 



I IKI3UII— »«BUilM>U«iy, Jiinuaiy ju, *j<-* raye >->-j 



• •• 



How to have fun^ 
curing a cold 

Getting sick Is always a hassle, but catching a 
cold is one of those minor irritants that can really 
drive you crazy. Everyone has a "cure" for the 
common cold, even though modern science has yet 
to come up with an effective one. 

Most of us know there are very few things you can 
do for a cold. It's thesame old formula : Rest in bed, 
drink plenty of liquids and take aspirin to relieve 
the aches, pairts and fever. 

The bed-resting part is the hardest. How can you 
rest in bed when there's work to be done and 
everyone else in the office feels just as lousy? 

COLDS ARE caused by viruses, my doctor says. 
He is also fond of saying, with a chuckle, that 1*11 get 
well in seven days if I visit the doctor. He's a big 
help. 

However, when you're not sick enough to go to the 
doctOT, and not sick enough to stay home, but just 
sick enough to feel plain lousy, then you're the 
perfect target for all the helpful know-it-alls who 
are just dying for y6u to try their "cure" for your 
cold. ^ 

THE ONE l,ljike best is what I call the "sip-it" 
cure. This one, advcated by a Scotch drinker, calls 
for the afflicted person to sip Scotch, very slowly 
'and very straight, all day long. If you're not a 
Scotch drinker, any high-proof alcoholic beverage 
will do. " 

The key to the cure, says my Scotch-drinking 
friend, is to sip enough booze all day long to kill 
those nasty old cold germs. And you must drink the 
booze straight, he says, because diluted booze will 
not slay as many germs. 

If you sip slowly enough, the theory is that you 
won't get drunk but instead will stay nice and warm 
all day long while destroying those pesky little 
viruses. It sounds like a great cure, but I've never 
figuredtut what to do with the booze while I'm at 
work. 

Do I hide it in my bottom drawer and take 
surreptitious sips while no one is looking? Or do I 
put it in my coat pocket and make frequent secret 
trips to the coat rack? 

XNOTHER CURE is the "sweat-it-ouf" cure. 
This one also involves booze (all the favorite cures 
are based on alcohol consumption, it ^eems). First, 
you drink a very, very hot toddy just loadai with 
'booze and lemon. Then you get into bed with every 
; blanket you can find. Then you sweat all night, 
tossing and turning and forcing those ugly germs 
out through your pores. 

In the morning, you're supposed to wake up 
feeling fine, rid of all the cold germs and feeling 
refreshed. I don't know about most people, but a 
night spent tossing and turning and sweating would 
not leave me refreshed in the morning. 

Then there's the old-fashioned "sassafras tea and 
booze" cure. Again, you must drink the mixture 
very, very hot. Before you can make the tea, you 
must find some sassafras roots to brew it, and the 
last time I looked at the supermarket, they weren't 
exactly displayed in over-abundance. 

Supposedly, the sassafras tea does not cure the 
cold but instead clears up the congested head so you 
don't care that you're still sick because you can 
breathe again. 

You can try all the home cures and while none of 
ihem is likely to cure you, probably none of them 
will hurt you, either. And while the cold germs 
linger on, you can have a heck of a good time trying 
all the remedies and sipping all that booze. 



Navy Bear Adm. Jeremiah A. 
Doiton Jr. of Virginia Beach, 
the first ex-Prisonw Of War 
(POW) to reach American soil 
after repatriation from ihe 
North Vietnamese, has* 
assumed cominand of the 
Armed Forces Staff College in 
Norfolk. 

Adm. Denton returned home 
Feb. 14, 1973 to rejoin his family 
in Virginia Beach after spend- 
ing seven-and-a-half years as 
a POW. He began combat air 
operations over North Vietnam 




from the VSS Independence in 
June 1965. He was captured when 
his plane was shot down July 18, 
1965. He was the first to defdane 
when the initial group of ex- 
POWs arrived at Qark Air 
Force ^se in the Phillipines. 

A 1969 gr^uate of the Armed 
Forces Staff College, Adm. 
Denton is the school's 12th 
Commandant and the fourth 
Navy admiral to hold the post 
since the college opened in 
August 1946. He relieved Air 
Force Maj. Gen. James F. 
Kirkendall, who is retiring after 
serving as college commandant- 
for nearly three-and-a-half 
years. 

Adm. Denton, his wife, Jane, 
and their seven childroi are 
relocating from their Virgmia 
Beach residence into the Illinois 
House at Norfolk Naval Station 
which is the traditional home of 
commandants of the Armed 
Forces Staff College. 



DENTON 



NAMED TO WHO'S WHO 

Brian NeU Friedman, a senior 
at Princess Anne High School, 
has been selected to be included 
in the seventh annual edition of 
Who's Who Among American 
High School Students. 





""ffiiim/lln 



NEW 

advertising rates , 
Classified & retail display 

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NO CONTRACT NECESSARY 
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Circulation 18,000 to 25,000 weekly 
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ASK FOR ADVERTISING. 



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K 



AYLOR 
RENTAL 



3825 Bonney Rd. 
(Located Near Moore's 
BIdf . Supply) 

340-09ra 



EthanAllen 
Home fashion Sale. 



Save on elegant Elhan Allen living rooms and dming rooms 




Save 1 0% to 20' 

Attractive living roooii 
tome <A the many selections youll Tind on ale at our 
Ethan Alien Gallery. 

One of our expeiA^eed^imie pUmten «iU be 
^ad to show you evoytU^ and hdp you make die 
ri^t de«>iating decUons. 

Come to our Ethan Allen Gallery now, where 
everythii^i n beautifiil. E^yeci^ the prices. 

Ethan Allen Galleries. 
We can hdp you have the home you waat. 



Open Mondavi and Fridays To 9 PM. 



CRAWFORD HOUSE 

Norfolk . . . 472 N. MiUlary 1 1 'way . . . 420-6321 



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JuMmMMt^MJmtmiJULMJmm 



tB 



CONSOLIDATED REPORT OF CONDITION OF 

PEOPLE'S BANK OF VIRGINIA BEACH 

of Virginia Beach in the State of Virginia and 
Domestic Subsidiaries at the close of business on 
December 31, 1973. Made to The State Corporation 
Commission. _ 

ASSETS 

Cidi and due from banki .1 • » '''JlVIi!?? 

U. S. Treasury securities 897,948.77 

Obligations of other U.S. Government agencies and corporations none 

Obligations of States and political subdivisions ., 6,559,022.36 

Other securities • ••••— "*"•* 

TVading account securities ...........;.;..■.....:;...; "'"'* 

Federal funds sold and securities purchased under agreements to resell none 

Otherloans :.. • •■ 30,216,612.30 

Bank premises, furniture and fixtures, and other assess representing bank 

premises : 1,891,867.09 

Real estate owned other than bank premises • none 

Investments in subsidiaries not consolidated ,««4vh,- "o"" 

Customer's liability to this bank on acceptances outstanding 644,159.00 

Other assets ,... . 5?M?I:?.?. 

TOTAL ASSETS - $46,480,811.14 

LIABILITIES 

. $15,820,964.20 
15,768,890.60 

358,711.69 
.. 4,099,227.61 

none 



Demand deposits of individuals, partnerships, and corporations 

Time and savings deposits of individuals, partnerdiips, and corporations 

Deposits of United States Government 

Deposits of States and political subdivisions 

Deposits of foreign governments and official institutions 

Deposits of commercial banks.., ?— ■ 

Certified and officers' checks', etc 

TOTAL DEPOSITS $36,327,282.28 

(a) ToUl demand deposiU -16,669,759.97 

(b) Total time and savings deposits 19,667,522.31 

Federal funds purchased and securities sold under agreements to repurchase 

Other liabilities for borrowed money 

Mortgage indebtedness ■ •• 

Acceptances executed by or for account of this bank and outstanding 

Other liabilities , ■ ■ 



none 
279,488.18 



3,400,000.00 

none 

none 

644,159.00 
2,034,690.71 



TOTAL LIABILITIES f.^M9.f.i}.?}M. 



MINORITY INTEREST IN CONSOLIDATED SUBSIDIARIES 

RESERVES ON LOANS AND SECURITIES 

Reserve for bad debt losses on loans (set up pumiant to Internal 

Revenue Service rulings) 

Other reserves on loans ...., • — 

Reserves on securities 

TOTAL RESERVES ON LOANS AND SECURITIES 

CAPITAL ACCOUNTS 



none 



$ 257,417.13 
none 
none 

$ 257,417.13 



none 



Capital notes and debentures 

(qiecify interest rate and maturity of each issue outstanding) 
Equity capital, total OilUA^M^ 



none 



1.290,000.00 



Preferred stock-total par value 

(No. shares outstanding - none) 
Common stock-total par value 

(No. shares authorized 258.000) (No. shares outsUnding 258,000) 

Surplus - 1.387,090.00 

UndhrWed profits 140,172.02 

Res^ve for contingencies and other capital reswves y.?*, 

TOTAL CAPITAL ACCOUNTS f.JMlt^^M. 

TOTAL LIABILITIES' RESERVES' AND CAPITAL ACCOUNTO $45,480,811.14 

MEMORANDA 

Avenge of total d^Kisits for the 15 calendar days ending with call date $35,564,000.00 

Average of total loans for the 15 calendar days ending with call date 29.971,000.00 

Unearned dtecount on installment loans included in total capital accounts none 

I. Aiseph T. Kyofski. Comptroller, of the above- 
ittniRnnaik.iIo iolMinlysirevtint this repo^ of 
coiutition Is true and correct to the be^ of my 
knowl«ige and belief 

— ^ ^ -eomctWtt^" Jeeepli-T:^tyofskl 

3. ¥. Mtlbon 



STATE OF VIRGINIA, CITY OF 

VIRGINIA BEACH, s: 

Sworn to and sibscribed before me this 17th day of 

January. 1974, and I hweby certify that I am not an 

<^fHXt or director of this bank. 



W. P. Whitehurst 
E. W. Turnbull 



(SEAL) „ 

My mmnuanon apirs Fcbrwy li, 1976 



Susan Ray Fuadl 
NotiAy Public 



Mh^M 



Page A-4— The Sun— Wednesday, January 30, 1974 



Counciltnan Isdell makes public 
financial disclosure statement 




ISDELL 



Complying with a request 
from The Sun, Virginia Beach 
City Ck>uncilman Garland IsdeU 
last week supplied the 
newspaper with his financial 
disclosure statement. 

Mr. Isdell was appointed to 
the council to fill the Kempsville 
Borough council seat vacated 
after Donald Rhodes was 
elected to the Virginijl General 
Assembly. ^J"J% 

Mr. Isdell states tha\ his 
position as pi%sident and half- 
owner of General Construction 
Co. of Virginia Beach, 6613 
Indian River Road, is his only 
source of significant income 



^ater than $3,000. He holds 
$2,000 stock in People's Bank of 
Virginia Beach and a total of 
$700 in construction bonds on 
t^ local churches. Mr. Isdell 
lists his home, located with his 
construction firm at 6613 Indian 
River Road, as his only area 
real estate holding. 

Ilie Sun r^uMted voluntary 
financial disclosure statements 
for publication last summer 
from all city council members 
ani the city manager after a 
resolution that would have 
made the statements man- 
datory annually was defeated 
by the council. The city 
manager and all councilmen 
compiled with the request 
except for Mayor,' Robert 
CromweU, Councilmen Robert 
Callis and Councilman George 
Ferrell. 

Arson trial 
begins today 



GARDENERS 

DON'T BUY SHORTl 

"" "mVrrytIller" "" 

THE LONG POTENTIAL ) for Torok 
IN THE GARDEN 

A TRACTOR, CULTIVATOR, 

IHILLER, FARROWER, TILLER, AERATOR, 

AND BULLDOZER-ALL THIS, AND 

(12) MONTH GUARANTEE 

FOR THE PRICE OF A TILLER!! 

COME SEETHE FACTORY 
FIELD DAY DEMONSTRATIONl 
CALL 855-1 949 

I^ND€?eOATBS 

GARDEN & LAWN EQUIPMENT 

3505 VIRGINIA BEACH BLVO. - NORFOLK, VA. 

PHONE 855-1949 • 



Theodore Torok is scheduled 
to appear in Circuit Court today 
on arson charges in connection 
with theS^t. 4 fire at McGinnis 
Flints, M Atlantic Avenue 
nightspot. 

Mr. Torok, 30, was owner of 
the club at the time the fire 
caused an estimated 
$100,000 damages. 

A key prosecutioii witness in 
Torok's trial is expected to be 
Edwin A Michener, 28, a former 
club employe, who was con- 
victed Jan. 22 of starting the 
fire. 

An investigative statement 
read during Mr. Michener's 
trial allegedly quoted him with 
admitting to setting the fire at 
the request of Mr. Torok. Mr. 
Michener also reportedly stated 
he was promised $6,000 of the 
$75,000 insurance payment 
which Mr. Torok allegedly 
hoped to obtain as a result of the 
fire. 

A delay in sentencing Mr. 
Michener was requested at the 
conclusion of his trial to permit 
him to testify during Mr. 
Torok's hearing. 



foee/ 



by Rpd Hmii 




There's one subject that is 
irresistable when it comes to 
shooting pictures for any 
familv album — the baby in 
hath. Jennifer Johnson, 
(1auf(hter of Mr. and Mrs. 
Tom .fohnson, 3213 Laltecrest 
Road, is a good i example. 
Jennifer's quizzical look 
nrovided an interesting 



expression for this serious 
portrait — one that any mom 
and dad would be proqd of. 
\nd. the round, plastic 
laiindrv tub is just the right 
size for anv 1-year old. 
nroviding plenty of splashing 
room. Here, the round tub 
niso serves an excellent prop 
for the baby's portrait. 




After 500 
times, it's 
all old hat 



BgUdU/Usk 



After Sunset 



Campground to open 



Seashore State Park camp- 
grounds, as well as «U state 
operated campgrounds, will 
opwi for the 1974 season >|0n 
March 22 at 4 p.m. 

Reservations for Seashore's 
campgrounds and cabins may 



be made beginning Feb. 1 at any 
of the 44 TicketPpn, terminals in 
the state or by writing to tjie 
Virginia State Parks Reser- 
vation System, Ticketron, Box 
62284, Virginia Beach, Va. 
23462. 



High Spots 

at Nifht Spots 

in Tidewater 

An Early Poverty Decor gives 
this favorite night spot a 
friendly and comfortable 
atmosphere. THE SHACK , 
managed by Jimmy Sellers, 
Mike Cannon and Jack Bellis, is 
known by the locals as "THE 
PLACE IN VIRGINIA 
BEACH". The Shack features 
specials 4 nights a week. 
Monday night Winter steak 
special, Tuesday Ski Flicks, 
Thursday night is Ladies Night, 
Sunday Special, 5 for 1 from 3 
p.m. to 6 p.m. Stop by 218-17th 
St.! It promises to be a night 
filled with excellent food, 
beverage, and fun!, 

MR. ED'S PANCAKES- 
Centrally located between 
Atlantic Ave. and Rosemont 
Rd. is brand new on the 
Virginia Beach Scene. After 
an evening of entertainment to 
be sure to stop by Mr. Ed's, 
featuring HOME COOKED 
MEALS and DELICIOUS 
PANCAKES -24 HOURS A 
DAY!! 



This entire space consists of paid advertising 



LYNNHAVEN LOUNGE- 
There's something new at the 
Lynnhaven Lounge, at the Mini- 
Mall on South Lynnhaven Rd. 
Now, every Sunday from 5 to 8 
p.m., there's Blue Grass Music, 
for your listening pleasure! 
Owner Jack Turner invites you 
to come on down and stomp 
your feet while quenching your 
thirst. 




BLUE PETE'S-Features 
Blue Grass every Saturday 3 
p.m. to 6 p.m. Fresh seafood 
and fine entertainment is their 
specialty. 



^»M^^»M»*»»M»^M»^« 



Blue Grass Music Now On 
Sundays! 



THE STOWE AWAY: Features 
SKI NIGHT every Thurs<tey 
Night, with Ski Films beginflng 
at 9 P.M. The SPECIAL FOR 
SKI NIGHT IS 5 for 1. Also 
jfeaturing Luncheon Specials 7 
days a week. Come in the enjoy 
the good food, fun, and friendly 
atmosphere. 



5n Wednesday, Friday and 
Saturday nights, there's 
dancing to the Country and 
western sounds of the Country 
Ravens. This 5-pc. group is 
relatively new in the Tidewater 
area, but is getting to be very 
popular with dancing folks. The 
band plays from 9:30 to 12:30 
p.m., and really swings. 



The Lynnhaven Lounge is 
open from 10 a.m. to 1 a.m., 7 
days a week, and there's always 
a friendly crowd to share your 
leisure hmirs. Stop by and see 
for yourself, they're located at 
the Mini-Mall on South 
Lynnhaven Rd. Take Exit 5 off 
the Expressway. 



^:i^:i^v^^v^v^^^^^v^v^^v^^^^^^^^v^^ 



BIUE 
PtTES 

Back Bay 

Marina Restaurant 



BLUE GRASS 

ENTERTAINMENT 

EVERY 

SATURDAY 

3PAi.T0 6P.M. 




Navy Lt. Cmdr. Dennis E. Becker made aviation 
history during the recent deployment of Fighter 
Squadron VF-102 to the Mediterranean. Cmdr. 
Becker became the first pilot in history to make 500 
arrested landings aboard the aircraft carrier USS 
Independence. 

The feat was accomplished on Dec. 8 when VF-102 
was operating from the Independence during a 
seven-month deployment in NATO exercises. 

Mr. Becker, who is VF-102's maintenance officer, 
is a veteran of 11 years naval service— the last two 
years with VF-102. The squadron is now undergoing 
retraining at Naval Air Station (NAS) Oceana in 
preparation for its next extended deployment. 

MEN OF COiVlPANY "C". 4lh Amphibian 
Tractor Battalion, Fleet Marine Force, USMCR, 
are preparing for the annual summer training of 
M^krine Reserves; Company C, under the command 
of'Maj. Albert G. Tase Jr., will host an estimated 
1,800 to 2,000 reserves from^throughout the United 
States during the six-weeks training cycle at the 
Little Creek Naval Amphibious l|se. 

_^,^ ii< kkMktkAkk 

REAR \0!VI. JUDSON L. SIVIITH. USNR-R, 
Commander of the newly-established Naval 
Reserve Readiness Command, recently paid his 
first official visit to the Little Creek Naval and 
Marine Corps Reserve Centfer. 

Adm. Smith briefed Naval Reserve offfeers from 
Virginia and North Carolina on changes being 
made to itnprove readiness of reservists and the 
support they give the active fleet. 

He said, "We will live by only one standard- 
readiness. These programs bring a brand new 
dawn for the Naval Reserve and our Navy." 

Officials indicated that locally the changes are 
scheduled to involve creation of a Special Warfare 
Staff Unit within the Reserve Center to augment 
activities of underwater demolition teams. 



\ CONTINGENT of men and ships attached to 
Little Creek are in Roosevelt Roads, Puerto Rico, 
participating in the internatipnal exercise 
"Springboard." Surface ships, submarines, 
aircraft and amphibious units from six nations are, 
taking part in the operation. 

The amphibious units from Little Creek include 
the USS Fort ^Snelling. USS Fairfax County, USS 
Spartanburg sCounty. USS Saginaw, USS Spiegel 
Grove, USS Coronado, and detachments from UDT 
21 and Seal Team 2. An estimated 1,200 men, 
included assigned personnel and attached troops, 
are operating with tiiese units. 

The exercise offers training in amphibious 
warfare procedures. This is the 21sl annual 
exercise of this type, and it is scheduled to be 
reviewed by Naval observers from eight Caribbean 
and South American countries. 




ALL YOU CAN EAT 

Thurs. and Friday-Oysters $4.00 

Fried, Steamed, or on the Half Shell 

Saturday-Steamed Shrimp $4.25 

Sunday-Fish Special $3.00 

1365 N. MUDDY CREEK RD. 426-200& 

OPEN: SUNDAY- THURSDAY 11 A.M. TO MIDNIGHT 
FRIDAY AND SATURDAY 12 NOON TO 1 A.M. 



GLIDDEN 



^£^ 




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-v 



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475 S. LYNNHAVEN ROAD 
MINI-MALL 340-9547 



f///>. Sf/ ^ Pancakes 

1752 Virginia Beach Blvd. 

OPEN 24 HOURS A DAY 

I 

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425-5012 



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Every Tuesday N^t is SKI NIGHT At The ^ACK 
~: FmIw^ ski FLICKS, ' Be|HNNiif tA 9 





The 

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W GAl, 



• Full-t)Odied for gootf coverage 

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Be Sure To See Our 
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master charge 





Va. Beach Blvd. & Baltic Ave. 



1^ 



-FRI. 8 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. 
•URDAY 9 a.m. to 2:00 p.m. 



Phone: 428-2331 



^^mm 



^■T'^fw^msmmm 



'"•HUH 






Tht Sun-W«dn«idiy, January 30, 1974— Page A-5 



FOR SUN READERS ONLY 



IMusf b0 postmarkBd 
hmforo Fob. 2Bth, 1974 




Bojm 



Y-1 INL opoumr. "Walk with 0w anhnais, talk 
with ttw aiAnalt." Thars what the adorable little 
girl Is sbmbig to her lamb |7JI 

y-2 ■YIIHMLiR ON THE ROOT. A kmely vhriinist 
sits upon a cottai^ roof nd plajrs the haunting 
"SunSe, Sunset" |7ji 

Y-9 -THE CANBT MUT. The Candy Man tells Ms 
wares to a pretty tot who reaches for hit tray of 
floodltt. VM 



m 




Y-4 UNGOLN 1928 MODEL L RADIO. An authwtk: 
reproduction, complete to hood ornwnent and ac- 
cessories, of a ciassk; car prized by coUectors. It 
houses a built-in, solkl-state radto that's tuned bv 
the well-mounted spare wheels. Every car buff wllr 
welcome one as a gift, you'll like It as a conversa- 
tion piece. Battery Inchided. lOVi" long. . .tOiM 




OmoHlfaMmv dock 

Y-l MUHATWIE ELKTRIC "JBTEMOT CLOCK. 

All the benitmil workmanshHi of a great ciUnet 
maker is captured In miniature In this replica of a 
tradlttonal^grandfather" clock. Evtiy delafl is 
faithfully reproduced In scale ... the miniature 
books, metal candle^kHcs, pitcher and fem-tllled 
planter. Fine wood grain finish wood cabinet wKn * 
rkAly embossed ck)ck dial. Hangs or stands^one. 
6%* X 24" high. .^.^ . UMi 




Y4 IKTM. MOGMI JBRUnr ML PMure how 
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T-l NYIHAY STOVE 
UCraO LMT. Earif 
. M wrtcacoroa a aHva again 

httiaaadani raoHca af 



ailMee. Bw Mack 



, M in 

OHiHfiaiy or on a nlgbt- 
4M4. R 1^ off a toft, 
leaNwini NonL . .tS.tO 



Col's Mm»I 





M SEE THRU MOK HOLDER. Cirar plutic holder 
hat large size file storage compartment. Protecthre 
card hohtar in front kteps recipe card safe from 
splashes ft stains. Comes with 12 index plus sup 
of lined file cards 5% x 3'/i x 4% . . 



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Jr«lr«^ 




Y-l CERAMIC CAT 
TEA POT. Tabby 
Seems to be sitting up 
in a playhil pose, just 
begging to be fed; all 
you have to do to fill 
her Is lift oft her head. 
To pour, just lift her 
by her tail handle: 
She's charming on the 
tea tray and makes a 
lovable pet on the 
shelf. 8" high.. 14.99 



A-14 RENAIISANCE 
lET. Bright blossoms 
encircle a 3" candle. 
IkiMer is 5" high & 6". 
dia. flowers & candles 
coordinate with goM. 
green or red hoMert 
Set 17.99 



12 TtHfO SPANISH 
BUiTARS. They'll re- 
mind you ol soft 
breezes and romantic 
music when you hang 
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are black wrouoht iron 
with "golden" strings. 
17V2". Will enhance 
any wall decor — Won- 
derful discovery. 

pr. S6.B9 

A-13 E8PANA CANDLEHOLOER. 

Spanish niglits come alive 
when candielioht fllclcers In a 

graceful ceramic holder with a 
urnlshed antique pewter fin- 
ish. 5" high: holds a 3" pillar 
candle. Encased In lacy 
"wrought Iron". Candle in- 
cluded, 9" tall. . . S8J9 




1-4 CALENDAR TOWEL Bless this House Caiemfar- 
Colorful printed linen towel, pichires a charming scene 
and offert a fervwt prayer. A 1974 calendar complete 
with wooden dowel and hanging cord. 100% color 
fata linen hand screen (tinted 16 x 28 81.10 



K-1B NMHTIllE OROANOER. This handy two-tier 
wood valet stores a pen and pwcll In the ttw tn^, 
wirile the roomy tray keeps keys, change, bills and 
aceeatorietatthtrtady. mxev^" 88.99 





double 



// M // 



M-8 OMERIJILIIIUOmA TEA POTl. 

Fhw drina.- hand made and hand deco- 
rated. In a chok» of Aree cotorfol de- 
signs and shapes. 6-cup size. Read 
hMdIes. 
M-S8SJ9 



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enterprises 



R-1 CHERRTWDOO SALT AND P?P« MHl SET. The 
natural good looks of ott rubbed wood. QVi" h^. 

SatSOJI 



R-2 DELUXE WOOD H' 

lovely salad bar with a 



HitAOSET. Setup.a 
4 tutft glass UmA, 6 smaH 



t)owls, 2 cruets, fork, tdion. taMr and mill on a im" x 
11" tray ......SellWJS. 







R-3 'COLONIAL" 
STEAK KNIFE SET. A 
handsome grouping 
you'll serve at your best 
parties. 6 kmm laH ... 
a maple finish wood 
stand topped ftith a toa- 
d Uonal (mM tone eagle 
finial. ir high. 
Set 89.19 



R-2 

47.05 

mm 



MmTni. Add 

rati Mvw to 
._. Mtdwi waO 
Ij^ ..'tanging M 
iHlow- box", n 



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ffSJB 



CUT 
OUT 
AND 
TAPE 

TO 
FROilT 

OF 
ENVELOPE 



Nwn*. 



AddrMi , 



Stat* 



Zip. 



FIRST CLASS 
PERMIT NO. 2333 
Viininia Beach, Va. 



BUSINESS REPLY MAIL 

No Pottaga Stamp Nacaiaary If MaUad In Tha United StatM 



POSTAGE WILL BE PAID BY 



'1 



double "S" enterprises 

P.O. BOX 572 
, VIRGINIA BEACH, VA. 2^481 



CUT 
OUT 

■ AND 
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: TO 

- FRONT 

■ OF 

:envelope 



YOUR CHOICE OF ANY OF THESE EXCITING BONUS GIFTS 

FREEIIi 

With purchases as indlcatad . . . all you do It ff/ve us (he nama ol a 
Iriand you think would enjoy racalving our baauUM eatalogi Every 
i^m thown la Ilia latatt 1973 m^chandlte! 



FOR vouR rmc lONua. oivt nami ulowi 

Nam* «f^rl«ni< 



Addrata. 



0-7 Hiday Homc •«u-.o!««™LI'E?tf 

ja smiling Mickey, this w»tl«nB''«j!J^Jj?Jg* 
handy receptacles to keep all your supplies noM y»™ 
you want them ... A lot for the money! 23%" x 
15Vi». (Accessories not included) : . . .^*M 




city. 



.tiala. 



Tir 



ORDER BLANK 



tHIf MERCHANDItt TOl 

Namt , 



f laaaa Print or typa 



Addraaa<_ 
City 



.Apt. No.. 



.tiata. 



TIT 



* In Unltad Pareal tarvlea araat Siraal Nama * Numbar 
ara raquirad. U.P.8. Cannot dalivar to P.O. Boxaa. 



lyasote 



l-OMlFiAUICECNEr. 

Aew ttm you're 

ma ganis anu ennance m 
reputroon as a host To Ml 
the insulatad bucket wtth tee 
cnbet, Just Hft Ow top of the 
baH by the goifar ' 
Mounlad on a wood stand. 
it'N make a great bar top 

uVGiHlDOII WfNn ulv DIh IS 

Mrt in play. 12" Mgh. 



r Maaak ta mi tat w ■ M*ily, mmi laaafk it mm DatiKk aM 
•II tJM MKkwat you MM. »lm duajt and SiyJ Itiitur-ltto. maul kmiml w^ can Wl» le.IO tfdat. 

X-tll-riECE rOir*-TMl Xlt. Uls m neelllioM mliwr ci' u>4 lionn imtrgtiicy npilri.Cllir plaitic 
eaia •illi iitarM standvd and Hiillin tciaw 4riwrt, niil puncli iM scrtw ihrtidtr Wilt I1I.M wdai. 



HOW 
MINT? 



WITH $35.00 ORDER 



mat 



«■} mreiiiAi imtaiit lou haimcvu cam- 

ERA. light 111(1 smiM, lo lil in pocktl or puise. 
yet likes Kodik of iny 134 ciiiiiilgc tliil gifts 
you I? Iieaulilul color or blick init wtille prints 
or 20 slides Mmilsome Dlick peOOle finish case 
wilh white melil Inm Attached cirrying cord 
Eisy lo loid mi operile Fictoiy wlritnly Will 
SU ft wdtt 



AW UN mnm eee. 



[istm 



VtL^i 



1 1 






M2 MAONEflC "NVTS A OOLTS" CHESS SET. 

Actual scaled nuts bolts antj screws thai amaz- 
imriy resemble traditional chess pi^es, hoW to 
the magnetized metallic chess board. 7" s«jua^ 

90.99 




K'l DECOBATIVE 
HOISESHOE WINE 

RMX-WIrt him good 
lud( and happy tast- 
ing with this nov^ 
wood radc that hoMt 
tan bottlet tlw con- 
noisseur's way . . . 
on their sides, for 
easy turning and 
srteetim. Mvces a 
hamtome disptey m 
bar or 8h«f. a* h. X 

rxarw. ..$19.90 



:■* ceiaiNewAiE 4-riEci iah sit. 

Twn odi gowmtt <W»h«i. milth Coming- 
ware Fipn ftHitr lo o«tn to table 
withotit diinige. tnd wnhei m your 
dishnshti Veil |tl i 2-«iiirl loil dish 
and 1 IVi guirt biting dish eith dtc- 
orated eiilh tht lim^us Corningmit Sun- 
Rower Thtme Clasi wd pititic lidl*ai 
thewi Wltk ttl.H ariai 



II 



enterprises 




CATALOC 
NUMttR 



NAME or ITEM 

tnlei m ilphibelic order, lowesl number lirsi 
tntei personih/ed ilems litl Name or miliils 



■^- 



Onlf i> aarckttt ii 
ADO P09TA8C '*'** '"^"' <""' ""* 

1. On aidtn FOR ONE ITtM ONLY: EnclMa 50t paalatt. 



2. For EACH ADDITIONAL ITEM add M( pottagt. 

EXAMPLES: 2 ittma, poataga S«K; 3 itamt. poalagt tl.lO. 

Nolt: trftit charges co»ar Parcel Poll »"''"•'.?,_ °"'j, 

mmm^mfm' m There i» no ch.irge tor handling or wrapping BE SURE TO _ - 

KVK^ f INCLUDE POSTAGE; Preverrt delay m the thipment ol your order Sony no St,imps 
■■ r^WWT g, COO $ «ccepi«il 



raid 



TOTAL 



SALES 
TAX 



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TOTAL 
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WITH EACH S 10.00 PURCHASE 

(Vour choice of ontl 



"OIJ2^-ANAME" lONUS BONANZA 

Xt Cotitielic Trinket 'N' Carryall 
1 X? 10 Pieca Handy Tool Kit 



WITH EACH SJ5.00 PURCHASE ; X3 Inttant Load Imperial CatAera 

Add $1 00 lor shipping In addition to potliige charget on your order 



iN-ON-Tie-COO . . . tastM bettv urtien smtfUy served. Mng 0« hotconj 

the table on thi large plater, place tfte com in ttw hidhridM senais,! 

«ie meWwl Wtw on from the twtter nwltw ttat Is hettfl W U* "■"j^' 

lie. salt »id pmpw from ttw siMkers ttiat sK on tfwir attredhrs tray^j 

ttw hot, buttwed, salted com wHh a pah of com spears:— rt in 0W| 

goMen kemri iMem. ' 

Salt/pw» and tray W JO 

1 Set of 4 com AshM tt*! 

4 pairs of «»ra tpws tlJOl 

Corn Platter UMl 

i4 Butter Meltr w/Cairte t<*| 

Entire Series (p«ati^50t) H-t' 



WITH EACH SS0.d0 PURCHAlE X4 4 Piece Bake Set by Corning 

Add t2 00 (or thipping in .tddition to pottage charges on jrour otdvr 



WITH EACH $75.00 PURCHASE 



'1 X5 Man't Watch 
_;_! X6 Ladiet Watch 



Add i 1 00 lor shipping in additipn to pottage charges on your order. 



WITH EACH tl00.00 PURCHASE IJ X? TO Piece Corelle Dinn.-r W 

by Corning 
Add $3 00 tor shipping in addition lo pott.^ge charges on your ouN" 



COMBINE YOUH ORDER 

WITHAFRIEM0<HI 

RELATIVE TO GET 

THESE MARVEILOUS 

BONUS ITEIW. 

(One Shipment Required) 



ALL MERCHANDISE 

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TO YOUR COMPLETE 

SATISFACTION. 



•I 



1 



^ 



■^■M 




Page A-6-The Sun-Wedn«day, January 30, 1974 



Basketball preview 
on page A-8 



Preview 



District title 
at stake in Cox, 
Norview match 




Wrestling season enters its final week of the regular 
season. Beach teams nnust rate as heavy favorites for the 
upcoming tournament schedule. Local teams have 
registered an impressive 23-5-2 mark against outside 
rivals. Norview is theonly team to give the Beach trouble 
holding a 3-0-1 advantage. 

TONIGHT 

Norview at Cox 

This match will decide the Eastern Distrifct regular 
season title. The two undefeated titans of the wrestling 
picture collide head on in a confrontation that has been 
building for weeks. 

Theonly pratfall that has beset either team on the way 
to the match was Norview's early season tie with Kemps- 
ville. Cox barely escaped a KempsviUe upset bid 22-21. 

The Falcons will enter th« match with a perfect 10-0 
record and a string of 37 consecutive dual match tri- 
umphs. Coach Bill Gutermuth's charges have been led 
by the efforts of defending state champions Chris Conk- 
wright, Mike Newbem and Jim Gaudreau. The wrestlers 
have combined for a 39-0 record this season. 

Norview and Cox had impressive warm-ups in action 
last week. The Pilots outscored two opponents by 75 
points, while the Falcon ammassed an 89-20 margin in 
their two matches last week. 

The Pilots should extend Cox more than any other team 
this season, but the Falcons have a winning tradition. 
Coupled with being the host team, it should be enough for 
Cox to co ntinue the ir remarkable winning streak. 



First Colonial 
^" f atBayside 

Local clubs, who are coming off of exactly opposite 
performances, meet in an important battle. First 
Colonial, with a 5-5 record, is struggling to stay at .500. 
Bayside, 4-6, needs to take both their remaining dual 
matches to finish at the break-even level. 

First Colonial met Eastern District powers Norview and^ 
Cox in succession last week. The Patriots came put a' 
badly beaten second both times. 

Bayside broke out of a January slump registering their 
first wins in a month last wec^. The Marlins handled 
Maury and Booker T. Washington in breaking a five- 
match loss streak. 

Maury at Kellam 

Resurgent Kellam faces Eastern District tail-ender 
Maury in the night's only mismatch. The Knights are 6-4 
on the year, while Maury has gone winless in action thus 
far this season. 

Gene Bunn suffered his first 155-pound defeat last week 
since joining the learn in January. The junior has given 
the Knights a solid performer in the middle-weights. 
Charles Skipper (185-pound) has been superlative this 
season, while George Irby has filled the gap at 
heavyweight. 

Maury has finally found enough wrestlers to avoid 
losing a match by forfeits alone, but the quality is not 
strong enough to test the Knights. 

KEMPSVILLE AND Princess Anne are idle tonight. 
THURSDAY 



Lake Taylor at 
Princess Anne 

lliis will be tl^e final dual match of the season for 
Princess Anne. The Cavaliers have stumbled to a 
disappointing 5-4 record with the upper weights failing to 
hold early leads. 

Last week Princess Anne suffered a crushing defeat to 
city rival KempsviUe. Star grapplers Ken Nowlin and Jim 
Benjumea failed to register a win in either of their bouts. 
For Nowlin, it was his first defeat of the season. 

Lake Taylor has been one of the more successful Nor- 
fdk teams holding a respectable dual match mark. 
Timmy Vaughn {155-pound) upset Kellam 's Bunn last 
week. 

Although the season has not fulfilled its early ex- 
pectation, the Cavaliers should still have enough left to 
end the season on a winning note. 

FRIDAY 

Maury at 

KempsviUe 

The Chiefs have proven worthy challengers to district 
powers Norview and Cox. Maury has ijot challenged 
anyone. Friday, the script should remain the same. 
KempsviUe has to&much overaU strength for the Com- 
modores to contend with. 

SATURDAY 

Bayside at 
Norview 

Bayside needs a victory to realize a .500 season. Nor- 
view should be down no matter what the outcome of the 
Pilots big showdown with Cox. The Marlins are catching 
their opponent at the right time, but it wUl stiU be an uphifi 
struggle. 

Cox at MenchvHIe 

The Falcons should have little trouble in disposing of 
Peninsula rival Menchville. It wiU be Cox's final tune-up 
before defending their Eastern District tournament title. 

First Colonial 
^ atQ-amby 



First Cdmiial has a soft touch to close wt their s^son. 
Once powerful Granby has managed a scant one dual 
match victcry this season, that commg against lowly 
l4af^. Forfeits have be«i the story of the Oitnets 
downfaU. Granby conc«i«! half the bouts before the 
match b^ins. 

Kellan at 
•sekerT.WafklB^M ^ 

BoJm t WaMnglMi should provide some stifTcUn- 
p^ioa ftr Kd«m ka their final time-up for the district 
iommey. The Kpi^Ms sliould be aUe to close oiA Uieir 
mf ^irt^»»#. ^ 



Former pro karate champ Norris 
to open teaching complex here 



ByJOHNBANNON 
SporteEditAr 

Karate is a sport— and then 
some. 

This is the opinion of fwmer 
professional middle-weight 
karate champion Chuck Norris. 
"Karate not only builds the 
body, t)ut also the mind," 
according to Norris. 

Norris held the world 
professional karate title from 
1968 until his retirement last 
year. Prior to turning 




NORRIS 



professional in 1968, the 
Californian won every major 
amateur title in the United 
States at least once during the 
period 1965-68. 

"WHEN I started out in 
karate, being the best . in 
competition was my goal," 
relates Norris, "Now that I've 
accomplished that my goals 
have changed. I want to become 
more-involved in teaching." 

His interest in teaching the 
Oriental art is the reason why 
Norris left his California 
homestead to visit the 
Tidewater area, Norris, who 
has numerous karate schools cm 
the West Coast, chose this area 
for his first school on the East 
Coast. "The facility is going to 
be the most modern of its kind 
in the nation. U cost $150,000 to 
buUd," according to Norris. The 
opening is planned for Mar. 1. 

Norris began his karate 
training 15 years ago while 
stationed in Korea with the U.S. 
Army. An injury while studying 
Judo steered Norris toward 
karate. "I seperated my 
shoulder during a judo class, so 
to keep busy while the shoulder 
healed I took up karate." By the 
time he left Korea, Norris had 
earned a black belt. 



NORRIS RETURNED to the 

States and storied teaching 
karate on a part-time basis. 
Business flourished reaching its 
all-time high in recent years 
spurred on by the flood of 
movies and television shows 
featuring the martial arts. "The 
media publicity has been the 
major influence behind the 
increased interest." says 
Norris. 

He believes the movies are 
just a passing fad, but the public 
wUl maintain interest in karate. 
"Karate fills in a necessary gap 
in a person's personaUty. Every 
person has a certain amount of 
.insecurity. Karate fills in that 
gap," says Norris. 

He states his son as one 
example of confidence-building 
involved in karate. "My 11-year 
old boy excels in both baseball 
and soccer, and it's not jUst 
because karate has gotten him 
in good physical shape. It has 
also given him the confidence to 
know he can excel." 

NORRliS HAS dubbed his 
system 'the Chuck Norris 
system of self-defense.' "It's a 
typical example of the 
American analytical mind. I've 
taken the best from each art 
(karate, judo, kung-fu) and 



Mended them into wje system," 
states Norris. Kung-Fu, the 
major area involved in the 
current craze, comes under 
some sharp criticism from 
Norris. "The Chinese designed 
the system for fighting people of 
the same relative size. Since the 
Chinese are a fairiy small peo- 
ple, kung-fu isn't of much help, 
when you take on someone who 
is 6'4" and weighs 220 pounds." 
Norris did have praise for the 
jHuidity of motion in kung-fu and 
'said he had incorporated it into 
his system. 

Women are <me of the major 
reas(His for the skyrocketing, 
interest in the sport. "Two 
years ago only two per-cent oi 
*my students were women. Now 
the figure is more like 25 per- 
cent," says Norris. 

He hopes to transfer his 
major base of (^rations to the 
East Coast. Plans are for 18 
schools in this area and 
anywhere from 150-300 schools 
in the East. For*now Norris will 
settle for the showcase facility 
in the Janaf Center. 

"When I was in high school, I 
could never get up in front gf the 
class. Now I'm at ease in front ct 
any group. In karate the mental 
aspect is the least understood." 




BAYSIDE'S DAVE Cash (face) is pictured in 
115-pound matcH against Booker T. 
Washington Saturday. Cash broke out of mid- 



season slump with a second period pin. (Sun 
photo bv Rod Boudion) 



Beach schools continue rampage 
in Eastern Districtmat action _ 



Beach grapplers continued to 
raise havoc within the Eastern 
District. Local clubs rolled to an 
imposing 5-1 mark against 
Norfolk schools. First Colonial 
was the only Beach club 
involved in a losing effort. 

in -action Saturday night Cox 
routed First Colonial 45-11; 
KempsviUe defeated Princess 
Anne 37-12; Kellam stopped 
Lake Taylor 31-20; and Bayside 
dumped Booker T. Washington 
27-24. 

COX CONTINUED their 
rampage toward their third 
straight state title with their 
tenth consecutive dual match 
win without a l(»s this season. 
The victory extended Cox's 
unbeaten string to 37 straight. 
The Falcons tix* the first seven 
bouts of the night in roUing to, 
the rasy win. 

Cox's Peter Drew scored the 
matches biggest upset with an 
8-2 decision over previously 
undefeated Freeman Gregg in a 
138-pound cwitest. The Falcon's 
trio of state champs, Chris 
Conkwright, Mike Newbem and 
Jim Gaudreau, all scored pins 
in keeping their unbeaten 
reconfe intact. 

First Colonial's <Mi!y victories 
were registered in the 155-pound 
and heavyweight classes. 



KEMPSVILLE SURPRIS- 
INGLY dominated Princras 
Anne in the lighter weights 
to gain an easy victwy. 
It was «ily the second time this 
year the Cavaliers had suffer 
ed a lar^ nun)b@- of setbacks 
in the Iowa- brackets. 

Defending state champ Ken 
Nowlin suffered his first «- 
pound defeat a( the season. 
Chief Dana Jadcson registered 
one of the year's biggest ups^ 
fanning Nowlin at 2:43 ci the 
second period. Mark Storey 
finished the ravaging of; 
Princess Anne's ranks drawii^j 
with the hi^ly regarded Jim: 
Benjumea in a 132 pound boutJ 

PrincMs Anne is now 5-4 on 
tli^ear, wfaik KempsviUe m 7- 



1-2. The Chiefs have won five 
straight dual matches since 
their loss to Cox. 

KELLAM UPENDED a 
strong Lake Taylor squad with 
a late rush. The Knights won the 
final three bouts of the match 
inimproving their record to' 6-4. 

Charles Skippei {185-pound) 
and George Irby (Beavyweight) 
continued their consistent 
wrestling both roistering pins. 
Gene Bunn (155-pound) suffered 
his first defeat of the season 
falling to Titan Timmy Vaughn. 

Bayside registered their 
second straight win conquering 
Booker T. Washington. The 
Marlins continue their drive 
toward the .500 level improving 
their record to 4-6. 

Bayside's effort, in the close 
contest, was aided by two 



Booker forfeits in key matches. 
Marlin Dave Cash (145-pound) 
broke out of a recent slump with 
a second period pin. 

On Friday KempsviUe 
outclassed Norfolk Academy 37- 
10. The Chiefs sewed up the 
decision with pins in the final 
three bouts. Mark Remarsky 
continued his hot wrestling with*" 
another pin. 

Action on Jan. 23 found Cox 
bombing Booker T. Washington 
44-9; Princess Anne edging 
Kellam 31-21; Bayside routing 
Maury 34-15: and First Colonial 
falling to Norview 50-6. 

COX WON nine consecutive 

bouts in moving to the easy 

victory. Gaudreau scored the 

most impressive win with a 

' second period pin. 



Princess Anne won the first 
six bouts of the match, while 
Kellam took the final six bouts. 
The Cavaliers had a 3-1 
advantage in pins to account 
for the victory. 

Bayside broke a four-match 
losing streak with the win over 
Maury. The Commodores, 
cellar dweUers in the Eastern 
District wrestling standings, 

have yet (o win a match this 
season. 

Norview totally dominated 
First Colonial to remain 
undefeated on the year. 
Freeman Gregg won his 138- 
pound bout 12-2 for the Patriots 
only win of the match. The loss 
snapped a three-match Patriot 
winning streak. 



M ARLIN.I AYCoolman (facedown )is 
in a sticky situation in his 112-pouDd 
bout against Bo<rfter T. Washington. 
Coolman suffered a 9-2 tefeat. 



Bavside won the match, however, to 
up their recm-d to 4-6. (Sun ph(^o by 
Rod Boudion) 



SIDELINES 

By 



Bahnon 
Sports Editor 




Odds and ends 
in Beach sports 



Elton Gross is making a strong case for player of 
the year honors in the Eastern District. The 6'5'' 
senior scores points with opposing coaches 
everytime Bayside takes the floor. The addition of 
Cronell Braitwaithe to the Bayside backcourt could 
be the shot in the arm the struggling Marlins need. 
On the football front, Coach John Cocke is lonely 
* while Bayside's Bob Hicks has had a wealth (rf 
visitors. Kellam's Cooke is still saddled with an 
eight game schedule. Ck)llege recruiters have been 
bating down the door at Uie Bayside's coaches 
office. Roscoe Coles and Don Harold have been 
drawing the most attention from the talent hungry 
colleges. 

Norview and Cox have l)een building toward a 
dramatic wrestling showdown for much of the 
season. The only blemish on either teams' record 
is Norview's early season tie with KempsviUe. The 
awaited confrontation finally comes ttmight. 

' "Everyone gets up for Princess Anne", laments 
basketball Coach Leo AnUiony. The Cavaliers' 
streaks could be the major reason for the op- 
positions attitude. Only three Beach schools have 
ever beaten Princess Anne, and Norview has not 
beaten Uie Cavaliers in sue years. Anthony's 
charges are going to have to struggle to gain their 
sixth straight city title. First Colonial currently 
leads the chase with only one loss to mar their 
Beach record. 

Princess Anne's wrestling team needs a 24-point 
lead after the first six bouts to hold oh for a victpry. 
KempsviUe was having the same problem until 
Mark Rimarski recovered from an injury to give 
the Chiefs a solid heavyweight wrestler. 

Kempsville's girls' basketball team is 
estabUshing themselves as a power in the sports 
initial year. Since girls athletics are here to stay 
some consideration should be ^iven to more ap- 
propriate nicknames— instead of KempsvUle Chiefs 
maybe KempsviUe Squaws. KeUam could change 
their nickname from Knights to Fair Maidens. 1%e 
possibiU^es sejm endlras. 



I 



•t-%- 



"»!<><>**** * 




Wrestling and basketball seasons are winding 
down to a close which brings up the subject of 
tournaments. The Eastern District wrestling 
tournament wiU be held Feb. 8-9 foUowed by the 
Eastern Regional a week later. 

The Eastern District basketbaU tournament is 
scheduled for Feb. 19 through the 22nd. First 
Colonial and Princess Anne have just about assured 
themselves of berths in the eight-team tourney. 
Bayside, KempsviUe and Booker T. Washington 
should be in a three team fight for the final two 
spots in the field. . 

The new 30-scholarship limit the NCAA has 
placed on its members has had an effect on the high 
school footttall player. "I expected the new rule to 
cause the coUeges to sign up their players real 
quick, but its been exactly the opposite. Everyone is 
interested only in blue-chip prMpects^ says 
Bayside's Hicks. "The rule has really hurt the 
marginal players. Schools just aren't as wiUing to 
take a chance on a kid as they were befQre the 
scholarship cutdown. 

Cox has to rate as the favorite to retain their 
state wrestling title for the third consecutive year. 
The Falcons stiU have a long way to go fctefore 
closing in on Grianby's superlative mark of 22 state 
titles in 23 years. 



All- America honors 
for Marlin Harold 

The high school football 
season has been over for two 
months, but Bayside linebacker 
Don Harold is still busy 
collecting accolades for his 
gridiron performance during 
the 1973 season. 



The most recent honor came 
last wed( when the 6'2" 205- 
pound senior was one oi 25 
Virginia high school football 
players named to the Who's 
Who in National High School 
athletics AU-America team. 
Maury's Joe Luster was the 
only other Eastern District 
player picked for the honor 
squad. 

This current selection goes 
with Harold's previous honors 
of All-City, All-District, All- 
Regional and All-State. The 
Marhn linebacker has yet to 



_.j^ 

■%^ 



J* 





HAROLD 

sign a college scholarship offer 
and is one of the most sought 
after aUjletes in the Tidewater 
area. 



Beach roll er skaters 
take places in meet 



Members of the Virginia 
Beach Skating Club, competing 
against a)0 roller skaters from 
sue states. to(A four of the top 
spots in the recently held 
Stautan Invitational 
Championships. 

Randy Bell and Rick Grigg 
finished one-two in the 



'sophomore men's figures 
canpetition, Ursala Jones took 
lop honors in the esquire ladies' 
figures competition, while 
Sosan Martin placed third in 
beginners ladi^ figures. 

Virginta Beach was 
represented by six rollers 
skaters in the tournament. 



^^MM^MMMMMI 



^ 



T 



VMHMilSMM 



""ifP^^ 



THe Sun-Wedn«sday, January 30, 1974-fti9i A-7 



Basketball's week 



\ 



First Colonial improves tourney position 

Saturday 



KemptviUen 
Botktir T. WaaUngUm 67 

, ^empsville grabbed their 
nrst victory over a Norfolk 
scliool in four tries this season 
Saturday night at the ^forfoUc 
Arena with a 89^ win over 
Booker T. Washington. 

"We shot pretty wdl," is how 
Chief Coach Bill Cochrane 
summed up the effort. Cbchrane 
cited the rebounduig of Brltt 
Glisson as a key to the win. 
"Glisson just decided to 
rebound in the third quarter. He 
really dominated the boards in 
the quarter." 

Gl^n added 14 pointy to 
roimd out his all around effort. 
Forward Oliver Mayfield 
continued his hot scoring pace 
leading the Chiefs with 21 
points. Guard Billy Foster was 
Kempsville's other double 
figure sewer netting 17 points. 

Despite the third quarter 
burst, the Chi^s had to hold on 
for the win. Kempsville held a 
flyeiwint lead with one-minute 
remain^ in the contest. Hie 
Chiefs committed a tumo>;er 
and missed the front end of a 
one and one situation in the fmal 
minute of, play enabling the 
Bookers to pull within a basket. 



The late ral^ fdl just abiHt. 

"This is a hard team to 
figure," laments Cochrane, 
"One ni^t their on an^ the n«ct 
n^t th^ not." On an on night, 
the Chictfs improved their 
record to 7-4. Hie triumph also 
pushed the Chieb district mark 
to 2-3 projecting than back into 
the tournament picture. 




Friday 



• 4'AV« 



n'^t^ 



Lake Taylor 74 
CoxCS 

Cox played their best game of 
the season, but all they got for 
their trouble was loss number 13 
in a s^son of frustration. The 
outmanned Falcons tell to late 
charging Lake Taytor 7445 at 
Cox. 

"I'm really proud of the boys. 
They gave ISO per-cent and 
that's all you can askj'.' said 
Falcon CoUch, Phil Williams. 
Cox did play over thehr heads 
holding heavUy favored Lake 
Taylor even throughout the 
game. 

Cox, down by seven points at 
the half, rallied back into 
contention in the second half. 
The Falcons actually had the 
ball and a one-point advantage 
with just over two minutes left 
in the flnal quarter. 




JJ.TQ!^ GROSS, iSOl Bayside star center, 
skvs for rebound over Cavalier George 
Piirdin. The Marlins beat Princess Anne for 
the second time this season 8(NK. (Sun photo 
hv Rod Boudion) 



A costly turnover proved to be 
Cox's undoing. The Titans 
converted the mistake into the 
go-ahead basket. Cox failed to 
convert on their next fidd goal 
attempt and were forced to foul 
to regain possession. Accurate 
Titan free throwing ended the 
Falcons iqiset dreams. 

Forward Randy Robinson 
once agahi led Cox with 19 
points, but it was the play of 
colter Steve Kazansky that 
keyed the Falcons near upset. 
The senfcir, still recuperating 
from a bad anUe, hit on 7 of U 
shots from the floor and gave 
Robinson needed rebounding 
support. "Steve is beginning to 
move around a lot better. He 
{dayed a great game," praised 
WiUiams. 

Cox faced Booker T. 
Washington on the road 
Tuesday night. 

First Colonial 68 
Kenam67 

First Colonial continues to 
lead a charmed Eastern 
District life. For the fourth thne 
this season, the Patriots closed 
a cmitest with a rush to over- 
take a fading opponent. Kdlam 
was the victim of the latest 
First Colonial rally falling 68-e7. 
For the Knighto, it was Uieir 
tenth consecutive loss dropping 
their seasonal record to 1-12. 

Hie shooting of guard Speedy 
Gainer and a sticky full-court 
press led the Patriot comeback. 
Trailing by 12 with under four 
minutes left, the Patriot 
pressure defense started to take 
its toll forcing numerous Knight 
mistakes. 

Gailner hit a jumper with 29 
seconds left to regain the lead. 
Yet another turnover sealed 
Kellam's fate as the PatrioU 
siHxessfully killed the ckx:k. 
Hie win pushed First Cokmial's 
season's record to 8-3 and 4-2 in 
the dUstrict. 

The Patriots jumped to. an 
early lead, but Kellam tied 
matters at 34-34 at the half. 
After an even third quarter, 
Kellam started quickly in the 
final stanza and seemed 
d^tined to break, Uieir loss 
screak. *" » 

Kellam's Jim f>erktBB took 
game scoring honors with a 19^ 
point effort. Bert Lewis led the 
Patriots with 18 points, whUe 
Gainer added 16 to the cause. 

Tuesday night First Colonial 
travelled to Bayside. Kellam 
was at KempsviUe. 

Maury 95 Bayside 73 



Bayside continjoed their roller 
coaster ride through the' 
Eastern District season. 
Coming off a big victory over 
Princess Anne, the Marlins 
rolled downhill and were flat- 
tened by Maury 95-73. 

Bayside couldn't contain the 
Commodores hot shooting duo 
of Vic Jones and Karl ton Hilton. 
The pair combined for 57 points 
with Jones hitting for a game- 
high'32 points. Maury bursted to 
a 15-point first quarter lead, and 
the Marlins never recovered. 



Pivirtman Eltim Gross was 
the lone bright spot. Gross wm 
his personal dud with Maury 
star Hilton scoring 29 pohits. 

The Marlins' record dropped 
to 7-6 overall and a (Uup' 
pointing 2-4 in district com- 
petition. The loss pushes the 
Marlins back into a three-way 
race for the two remaining 
district tourney spots. 

Jan, 22 

Bayside 86 
Princess Anne 68 

It took Coach Conrad Parker 
six years to notdi his first 
victory over Princess Anne. It 
only took a month for him to 
rq>eat the performance. The 
Marlins upended the Cavaliois 
for the second time this season 
80-68 at Bayside. 

The MarUns broke the game 
open in the final four minutes of 
^ay. Leading by a scant four 
points, Bayside took control of 
the contest behind the play of 
EUton Gross. "Gross has to be 
one of the best players hi the 
district," praised opposing 
Coach Leo Anthony. 

The 6'S" senior scored 19 
pouits and grabbed 18 i^imds. 
"He just domhiates a game," 
said Anthony. Gross' teammate 
Jim Goffigan took scoring 
honors with a 24-point effort. 

Bayside stormed back from a 
three^int half time deHcit 
with strong rebounding in the 
third quarter. "We took over the 
backboards in the thurd quarter. 
Don Harold (eight rebounds) 
went to the boards better than 
he has all year," stated Parker. 

Booker T.VMdaglon 62 
First Citoiiial» 

First Colonial finally had a 



tSports Record* 



THISWECK 

TanlfM 

WRESTLINO— First Colonial •* 
Baysid*. Norvlew at Cox, AAairy at 
Kellam 

niariday 

WRESTLINO-LatabTaylor at Prlncwi 
Anne. 

FrMav 

WREITtlMG— Maury at KempsvllU 

■ ASKETBALL-Kempivtlle al 

Bayside; Cox at Kellam ; First Colonial at 

NorvieM; Matry at Princess Anne. 

Alliance Chrlitlan at Tidewater Chr1s#lar 

Saturday 

INDOOR TRACK— First Colonial at 
Bayside; Cox at Lake Taylor; Booker T. 
Washington at Kellam; Kempsville at 
Princew Anne. 

WRESTLINO-Bayside at Norvlew; 
Cox at Menchville; First Colonial at 
Granby; Krtlam at Booker T. Washington. 

Tuesday 

BASKBTBALt— Bayside at Cox; First 
Colonial at Princess Anne; Granby at 
Kellam; Kempsville at Norview; all 
wrestling matches start at 1:00 p.m. 
prcceedcd by lunior varsity match it «:». 
varsity basketball begins at •;00 p.m. with 
Iwior varsity contest at 4:30 except in 
games involving two Virginia Beach high 
schools when junior varsity begins at 4:30 
•olloiwed by giris varsity cwtest * »:15. 

LAST WEEK'S 
RESULTS 



WRESTLINO— Cox «, First Colonial 11; 
Kempsville 37, Princess Anne 12, Kellam 
31, Lake Taylor 30, Bayside J7, Booker T, 
* *fr^li^ton- Mi Kempsville 37, NortWk 
Acfcemy W; Cox 44, Booker T. 
Washlnflton ♦; Princess Bine V. Wltam 
31; Bayside 34, Ma«rv IS; Norview SO, 
First Colonial t. 

BOYS' VARSITY BASKETBALL- 

rid«wMer Christian 64 Ryan School 33 
Tidewater Christian 64 LIndale 40 
Princess Anne «». Norview 45. Kempsville 
«», Booker T Washington 67. Lake Taylor 
74 Cox 65; First Colonial M. Kellam 67, 
Mau-y »S, Bayside 73; flaysWe «. 
Prinfe« Anne «•; Booker T Washington 
a. First Colonial 60. Granby 13, Cox ^; 
Lala Taylor «, Kemps\ He »: Mai«-y «J. 
Kellam 60, 

eiRLS' VARSITY BASWTSAL4.- 

Flrsl ColOBial « Kellam » 
'■ -ide JO Princeas Anne If 

BOYS' JUNIOR VARSITY 

• AJKETBALL— Bayside 54, Princess 



Anne 47; Cox M, Granby 41; Maury U, 
Kellam 40; First Colonial M, Kellam 50; 
Maury 94, Bayside M; Princess Anne 53, 
Norview 27; Lake Taylor S», cox 44; 
Booker T. Washington H, Kempsville 44. 

First Colonial 14 Booker T. Washington SO 
Laka Taylor n Kempsville 53 

RECREATION BASKETBALL 

VOLLCYSALL 

Wamble Realty 4— Lazy Doxen 
European Health Spa 5-The Bugs 1 
Rlohtmier Construction 5— Nutro 1 

DUFFER 

Royals 40— Plaia Gunners 38 

Ches. Athletic Club 30— Wildcats 15 

Wolt Pack 43— Antiques 31 

Nick Soda Shop 42-Stowe Aways 31 

Ted's Piiia 34— Eagles M 

Arsgona Pembroke 31— Lynnhaven 

Lounge 36 

TEEN GIRLS 

All Stars 17— Marlins 11 

Saints 31— Rookies 35 

Squaws 2S— Stingers 6 

Ball ot Contusion 17— BasMtavns 13 

Pantherettes 23— Arrowettes 31 

Steelers »-Cav alettes 14 

Commodores 30— Angles 14 

INTERMEDIATE AT COX 

Mariners 33— Hawks M 

Bulldogs 33— Lakers 30 

Jets 37— Squlras 33 

Rams "A" 45— Pros 3S 

Iron Dukes 51— Rams "B" 30 

INTERMEDIATE AT KBMFSVILLE 

HIOH 

Wood Braves 51— Rams 23 

KG. Blue Devils SO-Ken«» Bravas 40 

Panthers 3»-Chlets II 

Monarks 41-Kemps Blue Devils 31 

Hawks 54— Pacers 34 

INTERMEDIATE AT PLAZA JR. 

OenrxMis S5— Court. Knights 33 

Monarchs 42— Falcons 36 

Bullets 44— Plaza Knights ie 

Cavtf iers 47— Lakers 42 

Celtics 40— Knicks 1i 

INTERMEDIATE PRINCESS ANNE 

S.P. Lions 34-Chl«ls 43 

Seals 5»— Saints 3t 

GO Trott*rs 42— Knicks 25 

Chargers so=^;akeri 35 

Hi Jackers 2*-T1wr. Lions 22 

INTERMEOIATS AT ONION 

KEMPSVILLE 

wood Snulres 44-Ducks 33 

Steelers 27-Plaia Squire* 1$ 

Eag^ 3«-Pla» Lakers 14 

Larks 42-C»»arg*rs 10 

Bucks 3i— Arrow Lalwrs 23 

JUNIORS AT BAYSIDE JR. 

Arrow Lakers 5»- Bulls**' 

Celtics $4- Squires 4» 

Tar Heels 10- D S Lakers 3* 

Red Devils 4»- Larks 34 

CavMlers m- Bucks 41 

Wildcats 54- Squires 34 

JUNIORS REVISED AMERICAN S 

NATIOIfAL 

Trojai^ 46- Hawks tf 

Oiiets M- B«CS~37 

Lakers SO- Tigers 43 



Cavaliers 45— Celtics 3» 

Knights 50— P»cers 21 

Lakers 50— Warriors 3» 

MIDGETS AT PEMBROKE MEADOWS 

Pacers 11— wiMcats 7 

Stars 2(-Blaiers 11 ' 

Bulls 24— Lakars 13 

Supanonlcs 44— Suns 4 

Bucks 24— Hawks 14 

MIDOETS AT NEWTOWN ELEM. 

Knights 34- Spartans 12 

Billets 34- Food'ARamas 14 

Lakers 34- Barons 7 

Royals 4«— Falcons 12 

Nutlets 25— Knicks IS 

MIDOETS AT POINT O-VIEW 

Lakars 18— Squires 13 

Larks 54— Spurs 17 

tM\tti 41— Cardinals 33 

Knicks 32— Warriors 14 

Cubs 43— Hawks 25 

MIDGETS AT KEMPS LANDING 

Yellow Jackets 17— Warriors 13 

Indians 30— Tigers 13 

GobWen 30— Rcdbirds 13 

Cougars 33— Packers M 

Lakers 24— Stars 8 

MIDOETS AT ALANTON 

Celtics 21— A^arlners 13 

Airedales 39— Bulldogs II 

Wildcats 32— Sorters 8 

Cooke "B" 34- Squires 18 

Rams 23— Cooke "A" 20 

MIDGETS AT KINGS GRANT 

Celtics 31— Bullets le 

Knights 3»— Tigers 31 

Indians 33— Kings 14 

Lions 17— Cougars 14 

Lakers 33-Warrlors » 

MIDGETS AT WINDSOR OAKS 

Bruins 1»-Rams 12 

Cardinals 20— Falcons 10 

Lakart 30-Oemons 1* 

BulMtl 27-Vlklngs M 

PRE-TEEN GIRLS 

Patriots 42- Jets 21 

GMba Trofterettes 14— Pros 7 

Squlrttlet »-GoWdiggars S 

Btaa Angali 11-Chlcks 7 

Patrleisl * M a rm aMt23 



WW II Wl lllfl 

BEACH 
ENGRAVING 
TROPHY CO. 

TiopUes. naqMS. Aw«te 

MaiMne^gnvtag 

Cnig A. Montgomoy, 

herids^ 

■ 4968 Hokiid Rd. 9aite C 

49M«41. 



foifftfi quarter rally fall shut. 
The Patirkrts had erased Booker 
T. Washington's eight-point 
lead and tied the setH'e at 60^. 
Hie BocJ^er's Walker Meddns 
sank two clutch free throws 
with 37 secMids left to accmint 
for the final 4040 margin. 

Speedy Gainer led the fourth 
quarter rally netthig a Patriot 
hi^ of 19 points. Bert Lewis 
added 17 points hi a losbig ef- 
fort. It was the first time this 
season that the Patriots had 
droiq>ed a ckwe cmtest. 

Granby 83 Cox ft 

Cok stayed with district 
leader Granby for nearly all of 
the flrst half. A late Iwrst 
enabled the Comets to pull to a 
40-34 intermission lead. 

The Falcons challenged 
briefly in the third quarter 
before being outgunned by their 
more talented opponent. Randy 
Robhison continued to lead the 
Falcons with 20 points. Once 
agahi it was not enough. 

Lake Taylor 80 
Kempsville 59 

The Chiefs battled Lake 
Taylor on even terms in the f h-st 
half which ended in a 35-35 tie. 
Kempsville faded badly in the 
second half managing only 24 
pohits. The Titans took ad- 
vantage of the CMef 's cold speQ 
to score an 804t0 win. 

Tommy Graves led the Lake 
Taylor effort with a 30-pohit 
performance. Guard Billy 
Foster led Kempsville with 14 
points. 

Maiiry82KeUam60 

Lowly Kellam stayed with 
district power Maury for a 
quarter before falUng 82-60. The 
Knights were upended by the 
high scoring Commodore trio of 
Vic Jones, Henry Colluis and 
Karlton Hilton. Maury's slick- 
shooting conthigent combined 
for 56 pohits hi a balanced 
scoring effort. 

Kni^t forward Jim Perkins 
led the Beach club with 20 
pohits. Gary Woodhouse and 
Brian Macon wo-e Kellam's 
oUier double figure scorers. 




\ 



»'■ 



PRINCESS ANNE forward George 
Piirdin (20) drives for one of his 
many third quarter baslcets. 
Norview's Dan Ware (53) and 



Cavalier Rick Banta look on. 
Princess Anne won 69-65 behind 
Purdin's 28 points. (Sun photo by 
Rod Mann) 



T 



Weekend's Boxes 



KtmptvillBW 

O FT T 

Gilliam 1 00 2 
Myfield 9 3-S 21 
etissn S 4-S- 14 
PoBftr «M» $-4 17 
GIChiYt 4 1-4 9 
Ashby 2 2-3 A 
Moaton 0-1 9 
27 15-24 «9 



•.T.Washington *7 
O PT T 



Deoltch 
Peoples 



8 10 22 



CBrto-. 7 
Warnn 5 
Meaklns 6 
Young 
Willmi 2 
Brckhst 1 



0-0 
0-it 
0-1 
0-0 
00 
00 
0-0 



3 
1* 
10 
12 

4 
2 



Cavaliers spill Norview 
with third quarter 




29 9-12 67 



Kempsville ia 

B.T.Washington 11 



19 16 18 
17 14 IB 



Ptirdin 

Paden 

Callan 

Bahta 

Zirino 

Daily 

Gruber 

Pate 

Tucker 



P. Anne 89 

O FT T 

9 10-11 28 

0-0 4 

10 



8-8 

3-3 
00 
0-0 
00 
2-2 
22 



Whsntn 

Hughes 

Young 

Ware 

McNsir 

Dawson 



Norview 6S 
G FT 
6 



1-3 
25 
23 
4-4 
00 
02 



28 9-17 



69 
67 



T 
13 
10 
12 
18 
10 
12 
65 



22 25-27 69 

Princess Anne - . . 12 14^ 2A !7 T«i , 

Norview » 10 17 18-65 



Lake Taylor 74 
C FT 

7 
6 
4 
1 
5 
2 

4 
29 16 22 74 



Graves 

Harpr 

Lewis 

Barden 

Trwil 

Pattrsn 

Jhnsn 

Baker 



T 

24 16 
10-12 22 
22 10 
22 
01 
00 
00 
01 



Cox 65 
O FT 

Rbnsn 8 
Rchrds 6 
Allen 1 
Hill 4 
Kaznsky 7 
Bourdn 



35 
2-4 
0-1 
68 
01 
00 



T 
19 
14 

2 
14 
14 





26 13-21 65 



LakeTaylor 22 23 12 17-74 



Cox 



.21 17 16 11—65 



Hilton 

Jones 

Collns 

Blount 

Madden 

Kisseii 

Grffn 

J.Gray 

WcCrory 

K.Gray 

Norris 1 



Maury 95 
O FT 

10 



56 
22 
00 
45 

00 
34 
11 
00 
00 
00 
00 



Bayside 
T © 

25 Golfign 3 

3» FItchr 2 

8 J.Osbrn 3 

6 Gross 12 

12 Harld 5 



3 
3 



2 
39 11 20 95 



Coles 1 
Foskey 1 
A.Osbrn 

Tyson 
Butler 
White 
27 



71 
FT 

59 
59 
0-0 
5-6 
22 
00 
01 
01 
00 
22 
00 



T 

11 
9 
6 

29 

12 
2 
2 



2 




19 30 73 



Bayside. 
Maury 



First Colonial 68 
■ 6 FT T 
5 



.13 19 21 20 — 73, 
28 23 23 21-95 



Splimn 

Bowman 

Butts 

Doyle 

Gainer 

Harris 

Lewis 

Turner 

Woodies 



00 
00 
00 
22 
46 
03 
02 
24 
00 



Wdhse 

Folsom 

Perkns 

BIckmn 

Macon 

Mills 



Kellam 67 
O FT 

2 



39 
56 
34 
3-4 



810 10 
12 11 



22 23 35 67 



By JOHN BANNON 
Sports Editor 



Second half comebacks are 

^.becoming a way of life for the 

Princess Anne basketball team. 

The Cavaliers regrouped at 
halftime and stormed back 
from a four-point deficit to take 
a 69-65 win over Norview Friday 
night at Princess Anne. It was 
the fifth straight year the 
Cavaliers had upended their 
Norfolk rival. The triumph was 
also the second over a Norfolk 
school for Coach Leo Anthony's 
charges this season. Princess 
Anne is now 4-3 in the Eastern 
District and IM overall. 

Hie Cavaliers took command 
of the contest in the openhig 
moments of the third quarter 
behuid the torrid scorhig efforU 
of forward George Purdhi. "nie 
star senior notched 15 of his 
game%igh 28 pohits during the 
third quarter rally. 

PILOT FORWARD Carlos 
Hughes hit a jumper to start the 
second-half to drop the 
Cavaliers behind 32-26. Princess 
Anne suddenly awoke from 
their offensive slumber. Guard 
Richard Tuckef- ignited the 
Cavaliers with a steal and a 
Imigth of the court drive for a 
basket. Princess Anne out- 
scored Norview 24-8 on the tear 
spurthig to a 50-40 lead. 

Purdhi keyed the oitfburst 
scoring 12 straight Princess 
Anne points. "We toldGeorge at 
the half to let the Norview 
players jump and then try to 
snake underneath them," said 
Anthony "George was just 
fantastic. He only forced one 
i^t all ni^t." 



Purdin, after missing his fh-st 
shot of the second half, put on a 
great offensive display. Hitting 
on a variety of twisting jump- 
ers,- the 6'4" forward con- 
naoted on his next four field goal 
attempts. He added a 7 for 7 free 
throVy effort to top off his 
accurate shooting quarter. 
"Respite Purdin's heroics, the 
Cavaliers would need more 
clutch perfbrmances to secure 
the victory. A late third quarter 
Norview rally halved the 
Cavalier margin. The two 
teams entered the fhial eight 
minutes of play with Princess 
Anne clingbig to a sMght 52-47 
margbi. 

NORVIEW CONTINUED to 

pressure the Princess Anne lead 
hi the final quarter. Conrad 
Whlsenton hit a basket from the 
top of the key, two Cavalier 
shots were rejected by the taller 
Pilots, and when Curtis Young 
sank two free throws, Norview 
was within one at 58-57. 

Norview closed to withhi one 
twice more in the final nfihiutes. 
The last lime at 64-63 on another 
hmg^ange Whisenton Jumper 
with 1:03 left. At this juncture, 
Anthony inserted reserve Rich 
Gruber to add bettto ball- 
handling to the line-up. The 
move backfired six seconds 
later when Grubef was slapped 
with a chargbig foul and a 
technical in quick succession. 

"Gruber likes to drive, but 
Coach (Skip Noble) had warned 
him aboiU the ti^t manHo-man 
defenseSfe-view was playing 
right be^ he went hi," said 
Anthony. When Rich drew the 
lechnical, I thought it was all 
over." 

Fate smiled on Princess 



Anne, however; the Pilots 
missed both the free throw and 
their next field goal attempt. 
The Cavaliers were perfect with 
five free throw attempts In the 
closing seconds to Insura the 
win. 

FREE THROWS played in ^ 
Important role in the game's 
eventual outcome. The 
Cavalierl hit a remarkable 29- 
27 from the foul line. "We had a 
bad night at the foul Ihie a week 
ago (19-37 against Kellam) and 
it almost cost us. Ever ihice 
then we've been shoothig 60*100 
foul shots in practice," related 
Anthony Norview was i 
mediocre 9-17 from the line. 



The Pilot road riiow had won 
seven straight times on op- 
ponents courts before the 
Cavaliers lacked on "a bad 
review on the Pilot's last 
iravellhig date ot the 



K^ 



Norview started the game 
threatenhig to blow Princess 
Anne out four times opening uo 
ten-point margins In the 
opening half. Dan Ware hit two 
free throws early In die second 
quarter to give the Pilots their 
widest advantage at 24-lS. 
Quick-closing Princess Anns 
pulled to wUhhi 30-26 by the 
half. 

Anthony had Ills team spread 
out In the second half to prevent 
Norview from saggfaig bi on 
Purdhi. "When George Is on, we 
can play with anybody," 
maintains Anthony. 

Purdin administered that 
lesson to Norview in the second 
half. 



L 



30 8 17 M 



First Colonial 
Kellam 



.22 12 16 18 — 68 
,15 19 17 16 — 67 




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Because the Yellow 
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Page A-8-The Sun— Wednesday, January 30, 1974 



Four local clubs on the brink of tourney elimination 



By JOHN BANNON 
Sports EfUtor 

The Eastern District basketball 
tourney pcture is beginning to develop 
more clearly. First Colonial and 
Princess Anne, with wins last week, 
have virtually assured themselves 
places in the eight-team tourney. 
Bayside and Kempsville managed only 
s(dits last week in district play and face 
a tough struggle in making the final 
eight. KeUam and Cox are both faced 
with the near impossible task of 
winning all their remaining contests to 
gain a post-jeason berth. 

The second school semester has 
startM bringing its normal influx of 
transfer students now eligible to 
compete. 

Bayside 



Bayside is one Beach team that 
should be bolstered by a newly eligible 
player. Coach "Conrad Parker has 
expectantly looked forward to the debut 
of guard Cornell Braitw^ithe. "He is a 
real fine shooter and has the ability to 
see the whole floor," praises Parker. 
The5' 10" guard is expected to step into 
the starting line-up immediately and 
hopefully shore-up a season-long 
weakness. 

The Marlins own a 7-6 mark overall 
and are 2-4 in district play. This week 
the Marlins face Kempsville at home 
Friday night and Cox on the road 
^oesday. Bayside must sweep their 
games in the city to insure a tourney 
berth. In previous meetings, Bayside 



lost to Kempsville and barely edged 
Cox. 

Bayside has developed the dlsturbii^ 
patteiD of winnning a -game and 
dropping the next in recent wedcs. The 
Marlins also have a disappointing 2-4 
road record as compared with a 5-2 
mark in their own gym. ^ . 

Eltwi Gross has been flfeoro 
cdnsistent aspect d Bayside's play in 
recent games. The senior has been 
consistently good and is currently 
leading the city scoring race averaging 
better than 25 points a game. 

Cox 

Cox's season has reached the 
desparation stage. The Falcons have 
lost six consecutive games and are 1-13 
on the year. Cox is 0^ in the district and 
face almost inevitable elimination from 
post-season competition. 

To add to Coach Phil Williams 
already growing miseries, he has lost 
the services of promising sophomore 
center Chris Reich for the duration of 
the season with a brdcen hand. Reich 
was just beginning to come on when he 
was sidelined with the untimely injury. 

Cox travels to Kellam Friday night 
and hosts Bayside Tuesday. The 
Falcons lost to both opponents in 
previous encounters this seasoa Great 
Bridge is the only team to fall to Cox 
this far. 

Cox has a chance in both games. The 
Falcons have a history of {daying well 
against Bayside and Kellam is 
currently sharing Cox's basement 
residence in the Eastern District. 
Despite the mounting losses, Cox has 
shown improvement in recent games. 




Last week the Falcons came close to 
pulling off the biggest upset cf the 
season leading Lake Taylor by one- 
point late in the game before losing. 

First Colonial 

First Colonial has left little doubt that 
they are for real. The Patriots have the 
bestdistrictrecord of any Beach club at 
4-2. Although a two-point loss 
eliminated Firet Colonial from title 
consideration, the Patriots, barrings a 
total collapse, should gain a favorable 
spot in the post-season tournament. 

First Colonial is on the road twice this 
wedt facing Norview Friday night and 
Princess Anne Tuesday." The Patriots 
lost an earlier meeting to the Cavaliers 
by a wide margin. The Beach clash 
should have a great effect on 
determining the eventual city 
champion. 

First Colonial has a shot at taking 
both games. The Patriots have proved 
equally adept both the running^ and 
disciplined style of plav. Comebacks 
have been a First Colonial trademark 
this season. The Patriots have trailed 



at half-time in four of their wins this 
seascm. 

Senior Bert Lewis is finally beginning 
to assert himself in the manner that was 
expected ct Mm. The 6' 4" forward has 
been a dominating scoring and 
rebounding fwce in recent" Patriot 
contests. 

The key to the Norview game should 
be how well First Colonial's guards fare 
against the tall and talented backcourt 
of Norview. 

Kellam 

Kellam is the other Beach school to 
have its roster bolstered by newly 
eligible players. Sterling Johnson, 
Steve Butts and Morris Owens are the 
new additicms to the Knight picture. 
"They have to help us. By giving us 
more depth, we should be more 
competitive," says Coach Willie Bray, 
"We're just hoping to make the 
tournament. We must win our last four 
games." It will be an uphill struggle for 
the Knights, who are currently mired in 
the midst of a 10-game losing streak. 
Kellam hosts Cox Friday and district 



leader Grants "Aiesday. 

The Knights have improved of late 
dropping close decisions in two of th«r 
last three games. In those two sdid 
Kellam efforts there was a marked 
defraisive improvement. The Knights 
held both opponents under the 70-pdnt 

Forward Jim Perkiis has been the" 
offensive star of late topping the Knight 
scoring list in «ich of the last three 
games. Despite Perkins efforts and the 
steady play of running mate Gary 
Woodbouse, the Knights area (Msnul 1- 
12 on the year. 

Kempsville 

Kempsville improved their district 
mark to 2-4 last week with a victory 
over Booker T. Washington to stay in 
tourney contention. The Chiefs still 
have a toi^ road ahead (daying all 
their remaining games away from 
home. 

This week's opponents are Bayside 
Friday and Norview Tuesday. 
Rebounding will be a key in both 
contests. Kempsville will have to hold 
their own on the backboards against 
their taller opposition. In an earlier 
meeting with Bayside, the Chiefs 
managed to hold their own in the 
rebounding race and pulled off a win. 

Guard Billy Foster and forward 
Oliver Mayfield have been the big of 
offensive guns for the Chiefe in recent 
games. Mayfield has blossomed in his 
senior year into a big scoring threat 
hitting fcH- over 20 points on numerous 
occasions. Center Britt Glisson has 
been the mystery in the Chief season. 
The6'5" senior has had an up and down 



y^or. Kempsville dq«nds on Glteon 
for Uie buk of the nboatiSing work. 
How he fares in the rebounding 
department usually spells the 
mterence for th^ Chiefs. ft 



Princess Anne 

Princess Anne put themselves in good 
tourney position with their upset of 
Norview last wedc. The Cavaliers own 
the best record of any Beach chib in 
games with Norfcdk schoote earning a 2- 
2 split. 

The Cavaliers are at hmne for ttie 
remainder of the Eastern District 
season. Maury and First Colonial 
providi'the op^Msition on Friday and 
Tuesday nights respectively. Princess 
Anne needs to repeat their winnii^ 
performance against the Patriots, if 
' they are to retain at least a part of the 
cTty championship for the sixth 
consecutive year. 

The Cavaliers face a stiff challenge in 

second place Maury, r^o team has been 
able to effectively collar the scoring 
output of Commodore stars Vic Jwies 
and Karltm Hilton. The defensive- 
minded Cavaliers will have to control 
ttie Commodore pair if they are to win. 
Princess Anne has been getting gre^t 
efforts out of their bench in recent 
games. Coadi Leo Anthony has been 
dividing playing time up almost equally 
between ei^t players. The one player, 
who has not been sharing playing time, 
is f(»nvard George Purdin. The senior 
has developed into the team leyder. 
Princess Anne will need super efforts 
out of Purdin and their reserves to keep 
pace with their opposition this week. 



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Middle age is a period of sec- 
ond emotional adolescence, 
and with it comes a c(]fnfusion 
of identity. 



«f 



By DR. FRANKLIN 

ROSS JONES 
Special to The Sun 

During middle age (or 
middlescence as I like to call 
it), roiighly those jjears between 
35 and 65, a persistant problem 
is one d identity. In the bode 
"Faces People Wear," the 
authors name the crisis of 
identity as one of the principal 
difficulties besetting our 
troubled society. To put it 
simply, many of us do not know 
who '^e are and are struggling 
with the task of finding 
ourselves. 

It is like being an adolescent. 
Dr. Erik H. Erikson, a Harvard 
psychiatrist, states that identity 
confusion is the principal 
developmental problem (tf the 
teen-ager. The confusion of 
adolescent identity relates to 
physical changes and the 
attending psychological shifts. 
In youUi, this quandary is seen in 
such questions as what role is to 
be played — that of leader, 
follower or experimenter. 
Whose basic identity do I take — 
mom, dad, teacher TV star of 
friend? 

The middlescent also has an 
identity problem. The middle 
years, suggests Dr. Erikson, is 
a period characterized by either 
activity or stagnation. Activity 
refers to the production of woiic, 
ideas and creativity — raising a 
garden, painting a picture, 
sewing and the like. Stagnation 
is the opposite situation where 
the person is merely going 
through the motions of 
functioning. 

EDMUND BERGLER, a 

psychologist, writes the "Revolt 
of the Middle Age Man" that 
this is a second emotional 
adolescence and with it comes a 
confusion of identity. For the 
,j^^{irst 40 years a man hks been 
"unrolling fresh scroll tha t bears 
tli«>«(Dry o£-«r)iat he is and his,, 
aspirations as a worker, father, 
husband, lover, doer — 
everything. All he has achieved 
or failed to achieve is there, 
even his most fantastic dreams 
like imagining being the 
president of his company, 
winning the Nobel Prize or 
being Marilyn Monroe's lover. 
The woman, too, considers 
being sought after by Burt 
Reynolds or being fabulously 
rich and the owner of a palatial 
mansion. 

Man reaches the mid-point (rf 
the story when some event in the 
tale forces him to see what and 
where he really is. At the same 
time he sees^ the scroll 
beginning to yellow and fade. 
For women too, dramatic 
changes in the physical and the 
"blahs" of life force an 
evaluation. 



(C 



In the middle yetirs, one 
frequently poses the question to 
himself of "what's the use." 
With all the years behind, it 
would seem that the person in 
mid-Stream would know who he 
is, but the subtle shifts of 
ground belie this. The 
individual is under the heaviest 
burden of responsibility, with 
increased physical and 
psychdogical distraction, and a 
decrease in strength and drive 
with the self-doubt that past 
values will sustain for the 
remaining years. What has my 
life been? Fish or foul? Just wlro 
am I? 



Ik. Jones is a professor of 
educationai foundations and 
special programs at Old 
Dominion University. He is a 
recipient of the certificate of 
recognition for distinguished 
research in education from 
the Virginia Educational Re- 
search Assn. Dr. Jones was 
dean of Old Dominion Uni- 
versity's School of Education 
torn 1964 to 1969. 



THE CRISIS OF identity is a 
compound of the necessity 
of serving a middle- 
man function cf relating 
and older generations —-one's 
parents and children — and at 
the same time forwarding one's 
own personal fulfUlment The 
claims of time and energy are 
unrelenting, and although men 
and women reach the peak at 
their influence upon society at 
this time, it is also true that 
society makes its maximum 
demands upon them. These 
iressures along with those of 
biologica 1 change, 
environmental impact and 
individual self-realization, 
make the task of easy transition 
through this stage one of 
considerable magnitude. For 
the younger middle-ager, the 
shift in sex roles with the 
increased reversal functioning 
in problematic. Fluctuating 
mwal standards and conduct 
provide little stabilizatioa 

In the western world, certain 
expectancies for the various 
periods of life exist. They have 
arisen partly out of the 
historical adherence to the 
Protestant ethic and the 
pragmatic philosophy of 
.America. These are under 
"Qttack and are being eroded. 
These expectancies, 
nevertheless, are called 
"Development Tasks" by 
Robert Havighurst, a social 
scientist at the University of 
Chicago. The tasks that follow 
are for those in-between years^ 
and serve as a guide for the 
middlescait in comparison and 
evaluation of his life at this 
time: 

1. Establishing a standard of 
living, 

2. Assisting teen-age children 
to become responsible a'nd 
adjusted persons, 

3. Developing adult leisure- 
time pursuits, 

4. Relating oneself to one's 
spouse as a person, 

5. Accepting and adjusting to 
the physical changes of middle 
age, 

6; Adjusting to the 
emanoBBtion ci children, and 

7. Aojusting to the aging of 
parents and kinspeople. 

THE EMPHASIS IS on the 

word "adjustment," unlike the 
task of the child and adolescent 
where the key works are formal 
learning, developing, and 
achieving. In the young adult, 
the task is preparing and 
beginning. The overlay of roles 
bott from the past and these 
anticipated in the future 
combine to add muddled waters 




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to life just when one shakingly 
ponders "what's in it for me." 

One should take heart if he is 
handling the "Development 
Tasks" reasonably well. To be 
sure, the individual in quest of 
meaning ct existence examines 
his life course. Are his values 
significant in providing the 
strength needed for ctmUnuing 
the course? His Ufe goals and 
career seem questionable in 
terms of the cost and he often 
feels his status relative to 
personal success in 
inconclusive or that he has 
failed. At this point he 
frequently redoubles his efforts 
or opts for creature or societal 
comforts that he can have. His 
contemporaries everywhere 
have the same crisis. Though 
the confusion is common for the 
middlescent,^ unlike youth he 
knows life is best when directed 
outVrard in care for something 
or sotheone. This recognition 
makes for a sure identity or can 
be the start of a new one. 

Middle age is a period which 
is generally the prime of life. 
Many psychologists are saying 
it may be the best age of all 
True, there are many crises 
confronting one during the 
middle age period. But this is 
the time of life at which 
curiosity, creativity, and 
comprehension can be givm 
freer play than ever bef (H-e, not 
encumbered by considerations 
of vocational training nor 
limited by the sense of 
inexperience which normally 
afflicts youth. Oi\$ has learned 
not to take himself too 
seriously, but to take what he 
does for others seriously. The 
gentle brush oi maturity will 
polor writer Walter Pitkin's 
work "Life begins at 
Forty" with the vibrancy and 
serenity of a beautiful fall day. 



offers night 
counseling 



First Colonial High School has 
started a new night guidance 
counseling service, aimed at 
parents who work during the 
day. 

The new program, held from 6 
to 9 "p.m. each Wednesday, is 
designed to help parents who 
need general information about 
the scho(d or its guidance 
program. 

Parents desiring specific 
information about their 
children will be referred to a 
daytime counselor who will 
contact the parent, according 
to B. "niomas Copley, First 
Colonial guidailce director. 

Students may also take 
advantage of the evening 
counseling hours which coincide 
with the hours of operation <ii 
the school library. 




DEAN'S LIST 

Tonia Delia Mason of Virginia 
Beach, a student at Campbell 
College, Buies Creek, N.C., has 
been named to the college's 
Dean's List for the fall 
semester. 





NEW PROGRAMS 

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Fidil 



Built in tlie late 1800*8. St. Jolin's Cliurch ot 
Deliverance may look as though it has been 
abandoned, but members of the regular 
congregation put life in the old building every 
Sunday. (Sun photo by Rod Mum) 




During a pray ef to <Hien the c